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(KUTV Utah)   If your eccentric cousin worked the front desk of the In-Vitro Clinic where clients drop off their sperm, your family reunions may have an ever-growing story for years to cum   (kutv.com) divider line 79
    More: Strange, Family Re-Union, electroshock therapy, cousins, University of Utah  
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11892 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jan 2014 at 3:59 PM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



79 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-09 02:03:07 PM  
He's got the whole world in his hands!
 
2014-01-09 04:02:52 PM  
Midvale?

Obviously not a school for the gifted.
 
2014-01-09 04:05:16 PM  
That's ...that's pretty messed up, dude. That's the most devious cuckoldry I've ever heard of. Not even the wife knew.
 
2014-01-09 04:07:41 PM  
Say what you will about the eccentric cousin, he's got a lot of spunk.
 
2014-01-09 04:09:17 PM  
Patty Duke surrenders!
 
2014-01-09 04:11:14 PM  
Or.. She had sex with the guy.

How did she determine who's DNA it was?

WTF
 
2014-01-09 04:14:51 PM  

Stoj: Or.. She had sex with the guy.

How did she determine who's DNA it was?

WTF


Apparently the DNA test was her idea from the start. It seems unlikely she would do that if there were a shred of doubt in her mind about who the father was.
 
2014-01-09 04:14:55 PM  
Gotcha!
 
2014-01-09 04:18:28 PM  
That story hurt my head.  What the wut?
 
2014-01-09 04:18:49 PM  

MFAWG: Stoj: Or.. She had sex with the guy.

How did she determine who's DNA it was?

WTF

Apparently the DNA test was her idea from the start. It seems unlikely she would do that if there were a shred of doubt in her mind about who the father was.


I can think of several good reasons a person would bring this all to light.

1)lawsuit
2) lawsuit
Etc.

They thought it'd be fun to DNA test themselves?

"Family Night! Who's up for a game of UNO?"

"Hey let's test our DNA instead!"

"Great idea - get out the kits!"
 
2014-01-09 04:21:26 PM  
So, in darwinian terms, does this mean the sperm clinic guy wins?  He was able to spread his seed around quite a bit.
 
2014-01-09 04:21:27 PM  
"Eccentric", as in the kind of person who kidnaps a co-ed for 3 weeks conducting "love experiments" involving shock therapy to make them fall in love with him...

/there's always one in the family
 
2014-01-09 04:21:41 PM  

Stoj: MFAWG: Stoj: Or.. She had sex with the guy.

How did she determine who's DNA it was?

WTF

Apparently the DNA test was her idea from the start. It seems unlikely she would do that if there were a shred of doubt in her mind about who the father was.

I can think of several good reasons a person would bring this all to light.

1)lawsuit
2) lawsuit
Etc.

They thought it'd be fun to DNA test themselves?

"Family Night! Who's up for a game of UNO?"

"Hey let's test our DNA instead!"

"Great idea - get out the kits!"


So she intentionally had the cousin impregnate her 20 years ago so she could sue as soon as testing became affordable?

That's plausible, I guess.
 
2014-01-09 04:22:06 PM  
Quite honestly, I'd love it if there were a lot of kids out there sharing my DNA.

/that sounds a little creepy, don't it?
 
2014-01-09 04:22:17 PM  
holy shiat... that is a big crime...   I know they love their current daughter, but they where robbed of their "real" one...  so to speak.    must be a lot of conflicting emotions...
 
2014-01-09 04:24:06 PM  
I submitted this with a less confusing fark-ready headline: "Utah kidnapper is woman's father due to semen switch"

Cum to think of it, I don't think there is a language on this planet that could properly describe wtf happened.
 
2014-01-09 04:26:38 PM  
Ah, I had no idea this stuff existed.  Whatever - I still think this is all BS.

From another article:

Using another genetic networking site, AncestryDNA, the family found "Cheryl," who was related to Ashley but not to Paula. Cheryl responded to a message from Paula to offer some information: Her deceased cousin, Tom Lippert, had lived in Salt Lake City and been a sperm donor.

When Paula and Jeff saw Tom's picture, they recognized him: He had been a worker at their fertility clinic at Reproductive Medical Technologies, a clinic they thought was affiliated with the University of Utah. Tom's mother reportedly took a genetic test that confirmed Tom was Ashley's biological father.
 
2014-01-09 04:27:21 PM  
that dude is sick.  guarantee he did this to a lot of couples.

shoot him.   Sorry dude, you don't get to screw with people like that and live.
 
2014-01-09 04:28:52 PM  

MFAWG: So she intentionally had the cousin impregnate her 20 years ago so she could sue as soon as testing became affordable?


What I was striving for was, mom wasn't having any luck with dad's sperm, got to know the guy at the clinic, yadda yadda yadda, 21 years later the daughter needs surgery or something, mom is starting to think she'll be discovered, decides to concoct crazy scheme, etc.

I have an active imagination though.
 
2014-01-09 04:31:19 PM  

orezona: "Eccentric", as in the kind of person who kidnaps a co-ed for 3 weeks conducting "love experiments" involving shock therapy to make them fall in love with him...

/there's always one in the family


I was shocked he only spent 2 years in prison for that. Seems a bit light.
 
2014-01-09 04:32:09 PM  

WhyKnot: that dude is sick.  guarantee he did this to a lot of couples.

shoot him.   Sorry dude, you don't get to screw with people like that and live.


nevermind...reaper already got him....good.
 
2014-01-09 04:32:26 PM  
Cousin?  Was this dude actually "Paula"'s cousin, or did "Cheryl" just have some information about her (and only her) cousin?  Confusing article is confusing.
 
2014-01-09 04:32:30 PM  
They discovered, that prior to coming to work for the clinic, Lippert had served two years in prison for a high profile kidnapping, where he is accused of snatching up a college co-ed and holding her for three weeks and conducting "love experiments", that included locking her in a black box and using electroshock therapy on her to make her "fall in love with him."

Holy cr@p!  How was that only a two year sentence.

/ when I hear the term "eccentric" I typically think lots of cats and strange clothing
 
2014-01-09 04:33:59 PM  
And in Utah?  You want to talk about people obsessed with genealogy....
 
2014-01-09 04:34:12 PM  
I imagine these sperm banks just throwing the little cup's contents into a huge vat and when they need to swimmers they use a scoop out 3/4's of a cup.
 
2014-01-09 04:36:30 PM  

Atomic Spunk: Quite honestly, I'd love it if there were a lot of kids out there sharing my DNA.

/that sounds a little creepy, don't it?


Even creepier that I have you farkied as "Nipple Play". For the life of me I cannot remember why.
 
2014-01-09 04:36:47 PM  
Read where one sperm donor was later located and forced to pay child support.
 
2014-01-09 04:38:57 PM  

Buttknuckle: That story hurt my head.  What the wut?


Apparently the new thing is to find the most poorly-written version of a story and submit it to Fark.
 
2014-01-09 04:41:07 PM  
Article about the abduction thing.

This dude must have been fun at parties.

He didn't spend a lot of time in jail because, well, read the article.
 
2014-01-09 04:43:05 PM  

Stoj: MFAWG: So she intentionally had the cousin impregnate her 20 years ago so she could sue as soon as testing became affordable?

What I was striving for was, mom wasn't having any luck with dad's sperm, got to know the guy at the clinic, yadda yadda yadda, 21 years later the daughter needs surgery or something, mom is starting to think she'll be discovered, decides to concoct crazy scheme, etc.

I have an active imagination though.


Honestly, as far as the testing goes, my family has bounced the idea around a bit, but only because there's some stories about ancestors we'd like to get verified (Native American and African-American ancestry, supposedly). So it may just be they were curious and had it done. Then, whoops! Dad isn't bio dad!

Also, haven't scientists been finding that something like 25% of us have some sort of first- or second-degree incest relationship somewhere? It doesn't seem to be as rare as we'd all like to think it is. . .

/I'll google the citation in a few
//and I agree. How did that guy only get two years for what he did?
 
2014-01-09 04:45:07 PM  
Except for the daughter, none of the family members were related to this worker (he was not their cousin).

The article says that they contacted kidnapper/bio-dad's cousin, presumably because kidnapper/bio-dad had died years ago, making it impossible to contact him.
 
2014-01-09 04:52:34 PM  
Peki: 

Honestly, as far as the testing goes, my family has bounced the idea around a bit, but only because there's some stories about ancestors we'd like to get verified (Native American and African-American ancestry, supposedly). So it may just be they were curious and had it done. Then, whoops! Dad isn't bio dad!

Also, haven't scientists been finding that something like 25% of us have some sort of first- or second-degree incest relationship somewhere? It doesn't seem to be as rare as we'd all like to think it is. . .

/I'll google the citation in a few


I think it's like 25% of people who have congenital disabilities, somewhat lower for the rest of the population iirc. but eh, yeah, It's pretty interesting.

/we figured out our Native American heritage the old-fashioned way, by tracing marriage and birth records
//apparently I'm 1/16th Iroquoian
 
2014-01-09 04:55:19 PM  
Double reverse Darwined FTW!
 
2014-01-09 04:55:45 PM  

Stoj: Article about the abduction thing.

This dude must have been fun at parties.

He didn't spend a lot of time in jail because, well, read the article.


Wow ... this guy's life has WTF all over it.
 
2014-01-09 04:58:44 PM  

www.cuatro.com


"Amateur."

/Dr. Cecil Jacobson. He substituted his own sperm for God knows how many donors. I think people believe he fathered 75 children illegally
/This is the second time I've posted this guy's pic in the last three days. I think I'll just add it to my profile
 
2014-01-09 04:58:58 PM  
Man there are a lot of sluts in Utah.
 
2014-01-09 05:00:08 PM  
 
2014-01-09 05:02:37 PM  
I'm more amazed at how you can drop off sperm cells. It must have involved a really tiny forceps and a hell of a microscope.
 
2014-01-09 05:04:03 PM  
I just had the worst business plan: Baby Roulette

You get many couples who want babies. They go through all the procedures they normally would, but all at once. In the end, all the viable eggs are mixed up with the sperm samples randomly and you get one of them with no guarantees.

It would never sell, but it might make a good short horror story or something.
 
2014-01-09 05:05:57 PM  
Real life ripped off The Dominion of Wiley McFadden.

/Canlit obsurity!
//Finally get to put that English minor to use!
 
2014-01-09 05:09:53 PM  
Actually, key parties amount to the same thing.
 
2014-01-09 05:11:16 PM  
I think if I were the mother, reviewing the DNA testing, I would have taken that information to my grave.

Let the father and daughter spend their lives believing they are biologically related, destroy the results, swallow your emotions.

It's not like the father found out and he's questioning whether the wife nailed someone else to get pregnant.  The mother KNOWS this was a fertility clinic issue.

Lock it down.

idk, is it just me?
 
2014-01-09 05:13:21 PM  

doglover: I just had the worst business plan: Baby Roulette

You get many couples who want babies. They go through all the procedures they normally would, but all at once. In the end, all the viable eggs are mixed up with the sperm samples randomly and you get one of them with no guarantees.

It would never sell, but it might make a good short horror story or something.


Could end racism ... everybody would be brown within a few generations.  Plenty of other things to fight about of course.  Sounds like the start of a dystopian fiction plot.
 
2014-01-09 05:25:19 PM  

Atomic Spunk: Quite honestly, I'd love it if there were a lot of kids out there sharing my DNA.

/that sounds a little creepy, don't it?


Only if they take turns gargling it.
 
2014-01-09 05:34:20 PM  
How does he get a BACK at a clinic after he's been in prison for kidnapping and performing "love experiments" on someone.  you're think that would exclude him from working with other human beings.
 
2014-01-09 05:34:33 PM  

WhyKnot: WhyKnot: that dude is sick.  guarantee he did this to a lot of couples.

shoot him.   Sorry dude, you don't get to screw with people like that and live.

nevermind...reaper already got him....good.


But was a legitimate reap?
 
2014-01-09 05:40:10 PM  

orezona: /there's always one in the family


My reading of the article is that the "eccentric" employee was not any relation to the mother receiving IVF.  The mother used the results of the DNA test to locate a cousin of the genetic father of her child (presumably someone who had also used the DNA testing service) and that woman verified that she had a cousin who had worked at the clinic.
 
2014-01-09 05:41:11 PM  

platedlizard: Peki: 

Honestly, as far as the testing goes, my family has bounced the idea around a bit, but only because there's some stories about ancestors we'd like to get verified (Native American and African-American ancestry, supposedly). So it may just be they were curious and had it done. Then, whoops! Dad isn't bio dad!

Also, haven't scientists been finding that something like 25% of us have some sort of first- or second-degree incest relationship somewhere? It doesn't seem to be as rare as we'd all like to think it is. . .

/I'll google the citation in a few

I think it's like 25% of people who have congenital disabilities, somewhat lower for the rest of the population iirc. but eh, yeah, It's pretty interesting.

/we figured out our Native American heritage the old-fashioned way, by tracing marriage and birth records
//apparently I'm 1/16th Iroquoian


My family is Mormon; we've got records back to the ~300AD (which is how we know about the ancestors). Still, there could always be surprises, as marriage doesn't always guarantee genetic relationship--my grandfather was adopted, for example, and I have no idea if any work has been done to actually fill out his biological family's ancestry, or if we only have the adopted father's records. We also only recently found out the real story about how our Irish ancestor got here: stowed away on a ship after killing an English soldier with a shillelagh, and got thrown overboard when discovered. The story we were told was that he shipwrecked off the coast of Nova Scotia and bravely swam to shore. . . Oh he swam all right, but not because of a shipwreck!

/I think I ran the math and I'm like .004% African-American, and 1/64? Shoshone. But again, assuming accurate records. . .
 
2014-01-09 05:44:38 PM  

AFKobel: I think if I were the mother, reviewing the DNA testing, I would have taken that information to my grave.

Let the father and daughter spend their lives believing they are biologically related, destroy the results, swallow your emotions.

It's not like the father found out and he's questioning whether the wife nailed someone else to get pregnant.  The mother KNOWS this was a fertility clinic issue.

Lock it down.

idk, is it just me?


Except this part: "Paula, Jeff and Ashley thought it would be fun to do DNA testing" is patent bullshiat.

More like: "Paula and Jeff started to experience stress and discomfort when Ashley looked nothing like Jeff, or when they found out Jeff was positively infertile, and couldn't have actually impregnated Paula through the artificial insemination procedure they had used, and Jeff became convinced Paula cheated on him."

Gads, I can't believe I just typed out that Springeresque explanation.
 
2014-01-09 05:50:15 PM  
Editing is dead. This article is a hot mess.

In 1992 Ashley, now 21, was born, but with the recent revelations.

THAT IS NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE! And the only way that you could possibly interpret it as a complete sentence then has it make no sense whatsoever. Now let's continue:

Paula, using the genealogy she had acquired, tracked down a cousin of Ashley's biological father, who told her that, Thomas R. Lippert, her cousin, had worked at the very clinic where Paula had been inseminated.

First off, "her" is used too much and makes it confusing. For those who still don't get it (and I understand; I didn't at first), this is what it means:

Paula, using the genealogy she had acquired, tracked down a cousin of Ashley's biological father, who told her [Paula] that, [<--invalid comma (not related to pronouns; it just bugs me)] Thomas R. Lippert, her [the tracked-down cousin, whose name was "Cheryl", by the way] cousin, had worked at the very clinic where Paula had been inseminated.

And what the hell is "the genealogy she had acquired"? It sounds like at this point she knew who the biological father was (and therefore who his cousins were), but then:

Lippert's mother agreed to give a DNA sample and the result confirmed that Lippert was indeed Ashley's father.

Okay, I suppose it was just for confirmation, but how did she even begin to suspect that Lippert was the father in the first place?
 
2014-01-09 05:55:10 PM  
Cases like these are why in Oz we have a "five-women rule" (not that it stops the in-house loonies like our non-cousin friend here or Dr Jacobson) which, if you lose the documentation on a "consignment" can lead to million-dollar hilarity.
 
2014-01-09 05:55:14 PM  

nosferatublue: More like: "Paula and Jeff started to experience stress and discomfort when Ashley looked nothing like Jeff, or when they found out Jeff was positively infertile, and couldn't have actually impregnated Paula through the artificial insemination procedure they had used, and Jeff became convinced Paula cheated on him."


Another possibility: Ashely turned up with a medical/genetic condition that couldn't be explained by Jeff being her biological father.

Less Springer-esque for you.
 
2014-01-09 05:55:27 PM  

Atomic Spunk: Quite honestly, I'd love it if there were a lot of kids out there sharing my DNA.

/that sounds a little creepy, don't it?


Given your Fark handle, yes. Yes it is creepy.
 
2014-01-09 05:57:19 PM  

flondrix: My reading of the article is that the "eccentric" employee was not any relation to the mother receiving IVF.  The mother used the results of the DNA test to locate a cousin of the genetic father of her child (presumably someone who had also used the DNA testing service) and that woman verified that she had a cousin who had worked at the clinic.


Yeah that's it. Also, she commented on how the weird cousin who worked at the clinic kept pics of lots of kids he "helped" be fertilized-- assuming he switched his sperm with several prospective fathers. That's some twisted shiat there. I think I saw that episode of Law and Order SVU
 
2014-01-09 06:18:40 PM  

MFAWG: Stoj: Or.. She had sex with the guy.

How did she determine who's DNA it was?

WTF

Apparently the DNA test was her idea from the start. It seems unlikely she would do that if there were a shred of doubt in her mind about who the father was.


This happened in Utah, so the family might be Mormon.  Mormons care a lot about their ancestors, I think their genealogical database is the largest in the world.  They seriously may have gotten genetic testing just for the fun of it or out of curiosity, not because they suspected their daughter had a different biological father.

So how did they figure out who her biological father was if it was just some random guy?  They searched that huge genealogical database and found someone he was related to.

The Fark headline is wrong though.  The sperm belonged to the "eccentric cousin."  There was no person "dropping his sperm off with his cousin."  The crazy kidnapping asshole just swapped his sperm with that of this woman's husband.
 
2014-01-09 06:19:36 PM  

Peki: platedlizard: Peki: 

Honestly, as far as the testing goes, my family has bounced the idea around a bit, but only because there's some stories about ancestors we'd like to get verified (Native American and African-American ancestry, supposedly). So it may just be they were curious and had it done. Then, whoops! Dad isn't bio dad!

Also, haven't scientists been finding that something like 25% of us have some sort of first- or second-degree incest relationship somewhere? It doesn't seem to be as rare as we'd all like to think it is. . .

/I'll google the citation in a few

I think it's like 25% of people who have congenital disabilities, somewhat lower for the rest of the population iirc. but eh, yeah, It's pretty interesting.

/we figured out our Native American heritage the old-fashioned way, by tracing marriage and birth records
//apparently I'm 1/16th Iroquoian

My family is Mormon; we've got records back to the ~300AD (which is how we know about the ancestors). Still, there could always be surprises, as marriage doesn't always guarantee genetic relationship--my grandfather was adopted, for example, and I have no idea if any work has been done to actually fill out his biological family's ancestry, or if we only have the adopted father's records. We also only recently found out the real story about how our Irish ancestor got here: stowed away on a ship after killing an English soldier with a shillelagh, and got thrown overboard when discovered. The story we were told was that he shipwrecked off the coast of Nova Scotia and bravely swam to shore. . . Oh he swam all right, but not because of a shipwreck!

/I think I ran the math and I'm like .004% African-American, and 1/64? Shoshone. But again, assuming accurate records. . .


The test I ran on my Y chromosome was traced to two groups at the most recent split. The result was kind of funny when you translate the one group.

The Kurgans and the Gorals.

Gorale means 'highlander'. ;)
 
2014-01-09 06:41:41 PM  
This tread idiocracy approved..
 
2014-01-09 06:44:54 PM  

Pawprint: Editing is dead. This article is a hot mess.

In 1992 Ashley, now 21, was born, but with the recent revelations.

THAT IS NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE! And the only way that you could possibly interpret it as a complete sentence then has it make no sense whatsoever.


How can you say that. iI's a bunch of words, followed by that dot thing. Ipso facto, a sentence. QED.
 
2014-01-09 06:52:33 PM  

Snarfangel: Pawprint: Editing is dead. This article is a hot mess.

In 1992 Ashley, now 21, was born, but with the recent revelations.

THAT IS NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE! And the only way that you could possibly interpret it as a complete sentence then has it make no sense whatsoever.

How can you say that. iI's a bunch of words, followed by that dot thing. Ipso facto, a sentence. QED.


Obviously, when she popped out she had a secret envelope with the test results, but the family chose not to open it because they wanted to be surprised!

This isn't even the first story like this I've read.  There was a guy who ran a clinic a few years back who fathered dozens of kids.  Creepy behavior like this, sadly, in pure Darwinian terms, works.  There is an evolutionary arms race going on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6k01DIVDJlY

Duck penis.  WTF.
 
2014-01-09 07:09:45 PM  

Stoj: Article about the abduction thing.

This dude must have been fun at parties.

He didn't spend a lot of time in jail because, well, read the article.


Holy crap... Purdue? How did I never hear about this while there?

Dude watched "Behind the Green Door" a few too many times...
 
2014-01-09 07:15:53 PM  

Stoj: Article about the abduction thing.

This dude must have been fun at parties.

He didn't spend a lot of time in jail because, well, read the article.


What the Actual F•ck!?!

That's some weird shiat.

That story, coupled with this one would make a great book or TV show or something. I don't know... I need a nap.
 
2014-01-09 07:23:50 PM  
img.fark.net

I don't know why this story reminded me of this funny juxtaposition.
 
2014-01-09 07:31:28 PM  
To avoid an embarrassing face-to-face, you need to use the sperm bank's ATM
s23.postimg.org
 
2014-01-09 07:42:07 PM  

TheCableGuy: Midvale?

Obviously not a school for the gifted.


You owe me a .... farkit I hated that keyboard anyways hehehehehe laughing my head off
 
2014-01-09 07:43:37 PM  

WhyKnot: WhyKnot: that dude is sick.  guarantee he did this to a lot of couples.

shoot him.   Sorry dude, you don't get to screw with people like that and live.

nevermind...reaper already got him....good.


We all die, friend, but not all of us father over a hundred babies.
 
2014-01-09 07:54:24 PM  
Might this qualify as rape?
 
2014-01-09 08:09:17 PM  
Sounds like this guy was just, you know, small potatoes.
 
2014-01-09 08:09:47 PM  

Russ1642: Might this qualify as rape?


Maybe if you want to define rape as a violation of bodily integrity. Maybe this would be a subset? Like second-degree rape?

/oof, I really don't want to go down the "legitimate rape-rape" lines, but it could apply here. . .
 
2014-01-09 08:21:02 PM  

powhound: I submitted this with a less confusing fark-ready headline: "Utah kidnapper is woman's father due to semen switch"

Cum to think of it, I don't think there is a language on this planet that could properly describe wtf happened.


How about "What an unforgivable wanker"?
 
2014-01-09 08:22:03 PM  

Peki: My family is Mormon; we've got records back to the ~300AD (which is how we know about the ancestors).


Can you post any of your evidence? Genuinely interested.

/I think I ran the math and I'm like .004% African-American, and 1/64? Shoshone. But again, assuming accurate records. . .

Go back far enough, and we're all Africans.

And descendants of Charlemagne.

We all come from a pretty small initial population, and we are all related to each other at some point in history. It's just stupid human tribalism that makes us create races and nations and so on.
 
2014-01-09 08:31:10 PM  

iron de havilland: Can you post any of your evidence? Genuinely interested.


If I had it, I would. But the family is going through my great-grandmother's records now and entering them into the Mormon database; I'm just not sure who has the original records. We do have documentation to trace it through Charlemagne (ah, I see you mentioned that further down your post that pretty much everyone can) and I think we can go back to around the 300s from there. Some of our lines only go back so far as the Bolshevik revolution, when our family fled the Ukraine--most of the records were destroyed in the revolution, so we may have lost all of that information unless we decide to travel and visit graveyards (assuming those weren't and haven't been destroyed).
 
2014-01-09 09:18:23 PM  

Peki: iron de havilland: Can you post any of your evidence? Genuinely interested.

If I had it, I would. But the family is going through my great-grandmother's records now and entering them into the Mormon database; I'm just not sure who has the original records. We do have documentation to trace it through Charlemagne (ah, I see you mentioned that further down your post that pretty much everyone can) and I think we can go back to around the 300s from there. Some of our lines only go back so far as the Bolshevik revolution, when our family fled the Ukraine--most of the records were destroyed in the revolution, so we may have lost all of that information unless we decide to travel and visit graveyards (assuming those weren't and haven't been destroyed).


Or, in other words: "no, as I have found no evidence".

The American ancestral obsession fascinates me. I mean, I know my parents, I knew my grandmothers - both by grandfathers died before I was born. I've heard stories about how GGM was a bit of a coont.

But why should I care about my ancestry before that? If the ancestor has no direct influence on my life, what does it matter?
 
2014-01-09 09:36:05 PM  

iron de havilland: Or, in other words: "no, as I have found no evidence".


Yeah, okay, if you want to go that route. The LDS church is pretty well respected for their genealogy work, even if their religion is crap. When I get the "evidence" (you may be waiting about 30 years for my mother to die off), I'll come back here and give it to you.

iron de havilland: But why should I care about my ancestry before that? If the ancestor has no direct influence on my life, what does it matter?


For the Mormons: To ensure your relatives can be accepted into heaven (or a form of it at least). Keep in mind you're talking about a religion that believes in posthumous baptisms.

From an American standpoint? My guess is it has to do with the racial context. If I think I'm white, and I find out I'm 1/4 black, and I'm in the KKK. . .

/no, it doesn't always change a person's mind, but it can certainly help gain perspective, and Americans badly need it. Europeans and Canadians? Maybe not so much.
 
2014-01-09 09:53:27 PM  

Peki: iron de havilland: Or, in other words: "no, as I have found no evidence".

Yeah, okay, if you want to go that route. The LDS church is pretty well respected for their genealogy work, even if their religion is crap. When I get the "evidence" (you may be waiting about 30 years for my mother to die off), I'll come back here and give it to you.


Your original claim was:

My family is Mormon; we've got records back to the ~300AD (which is how we know about the ancestors).

I know the LDS folk are well in to genealogy. But, if you're claiming some kind of link to that era, you really should be able to back it up.

iron de havilland: But why should I care about my ancestry before that? If the ancestor has no direct influence on my life, what does it matter?

For the Mormons: To ensure your relatives can be accepted into heaven (or a form of it at least). Keep in mind you're talking about a religion that believes in posthumous baptisms.


Personally, that doesn't affect me. If baptising me into the LDS gives them a stiffy, they should go for it.

I can kind of understand how people of religion might have an issue with this, however.

From an American standpoint? My guess is it has to do with the racial context. If I think I'm white, and I find out I'm 1/4 black, and I'm in the KKK. . .

/no, it doesn't always change a person's mind, but it can certainly help gain perspective, and Americans badly need it. Europeans and Canadians? Maybe not so much.


I'd disagree about the "Europeans and Canadians" aspect of your comment. Bigots exist all around the world.

Why that should be is the question.
 
2014-01-09 10:39:04 PM  

iron de havilland: I know the LDS folk are well in to genealogy. But, if you're claiming some kind of link to that era, you really should be able to back it up.


That would require establishing a relationship with my mother. I'm not going to do that just because you want evidence. Between my great-grandmother's basement full of records and the Mormon church being a legitimate resource, I'm comfortable making the claim.

iron de havilland: I'd disagree about the "Europeans and Canadians" aspect of your comment. Bigots exist all around the world.


Eh. I'm not familiar enough with European or Canadian history to know if they had a codified one-drop rule like the US did.
 
2014-01-09 10:44:46 PM  

iron de havilland: The American ancestral obsession fascinates me. I mean, I know my parents, I knew my grandmothers - both by grandfathers died before I was born. I've heard stories about how GGM was a bit of a coont.
But why should I care about my ancestry before that? If the ancestor has no direct influence on my life, what does it matter?


I don't have much interest in my ancestry either. Lots of people seem to be obsessed with it though. As far as I can tell, most Americans are mostly "mongrel." We came from......Europe.
 
2014-01-09 11:23:38 PM  
iron de havilland: 
The American ancestral obsession fascinates me. I mean, I know my parents, I knew my grandmothers - both by grandfathers died before I was born. I've heard stories about how GGM was a bit of a coont.

But why should I care about my ancestry before that? If the ancestor has no direct influence on my life, what does it matter?



Most of us have only heard stories about ancestors from other countries but have no idea where we came from, why we look a certain way, why our families have certain traditions other families do not, and so on. We're not a homogenous culture by any means and so knowing that information helps to give us a greater sense of identity.
 
2014-01-10 12:06:56 AM  

theorellior: Sounds like this guy was just, you know, small potatoes.


X-files FTW.
 
2014-01-10 02:45:12 AM  

Peki: iron de havilland: Or, in other words: "no, as I have found no evidence".

Yeah, okay, if you want to go that route. The LDS church is pretty well respected for their genealogy work, even if their religion is crap. When I get the "evidence" (you may be waiting about 30 years for my mother to die off), I'll come back here and give it to you.

iron de havilland: But why should I care about my ancestry before that? If the ancestor has no direct influence on my life, what does it matter?

For the Mormons: To ensure your relatives can be accepted into heaven (or a form of it at least). Keep in mind you're talking about a religion that believes in posthumous baptisms.

From an American standpoint? My guess is it has to do with the racial context. If I think I'm white, and I find out I'm 1/4 black, and I'm in the KKK. . .

/no, it doesn't always change a person's mind, but it can certainly help gain perspective, and Americans badly need it. Europeans and Canadians? Maybe not so much.


Or, y'know, some of us might just be genuinely curious about how our families got to where they are now, what with that big ocean in the way.
 
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