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(Slate)   My god, it's full of galaxies   (slate.com) divider line 80
    More: Interesting, galaxies, Death from the Skies, Spitzer Space Telescope, Milky Way Galaxy, Hubble, Bad Astronomy, light-years, redshifts  
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4252 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jan 2014 at 2:40 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-09 11:41:38 AM  
13.2 billion light years....neat.
 
2014-01-09 01:02:25 PM  
Ow, my significance!
 
2014-01-09 01:49:34 PM  
Whenever I look at pictures of the universe, I cannot but help think of my own short, mortal existence and lament that I will likely never know the vast secrets of the universe.
 
2014-01-09 02:05:21 PM  

Sybarite: Ow, my significance!


Let's see a galaxy write this. You are loved. Maybe.
 
2014-01-09 02:45:20 PM  
But we're stuck here, which kind of sucks.
 
2014-01-09 02:52:22 PM  

myhigherdrive.com

 
2014-01-09 02:53:10 PM  
"Bill-yuns & bill-yuns of 'em." -- Carl Sagan in Cosmos, prod 1978-89, aired 1980 on PBS stations (only recalled he said, GoodSearched rest!)
 
2014-01-09 02:57:00 PM  

laulaja: "Bill-yuns & bill-yuns of 'em." -- Carl Sagan in Cosmos, prod 1978-89, aired 1980 on PBS stations (only recalled he said, GoodSearched rest!)


From Cosmos and his frequent appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, Sagan became associated with the catchphrase "billions and billions". Sagan stated that he never actually used the phrase in the Cosmos series.[43] The closest that he ever came was in the book Cosmos, where he talked of "billions upon billions":[44]

A galaxy is composed of gas and dust and stars-billions upon billions of stars.
-Carl Sagan, Cosmos, page 3[45]
 
2014-01-09 03:06:48 PM  

laulaja: "Bill-yuns & bill-yuns of 'em." -- Carl Sagan in Cosmos, prod 1978-89, aired 1980 on PBS stations (only recalled he said, GoodSearched rest!)


What's the current estimate of the number of galaxies? I didn't see it mentioned in TFA.
 
2014-01-09 03:10:13 PM  
Christie is going to shut it down.
 
2014-01-09 03:14:06 PM  
But of course, we're the only life in the universe.
 
2014-01-09 03:19:02 PM  

mootmah: But of course, we're the only life in the universe.


Better believe it, God's not out whoring around.
 
2014-01-09 03:21:51 PM  

mootmah: But of course, we're the only life in the universe.


Nonsense. The bibble doesn't say that at all. It just says we're special because Jeebus...and short busses.
 
2014-01-09 03:24:44 PM  
If they are that close together, that young, and that bright? My guess is we're getting closer to looking at the spot where the big bang started. Would be interesting to do the same look somewhere else and see if you get the dots again, or if they are only in one direction in the sky.

Also, where are we in reference to where the big bang happened, verses the edge of the known universe? Do we know? We seem to act like we are on the outside edge looking in, but what's in front of us?

/astronomy is awesome. Real, live time travel. . .
 
2014-01-09 03:26:18 PM  

Stone Meadow: mootmah: But of course, we're the only life in the universe.

Nonsense. The bibble doesn't say that at all. It just says we're special because Jeebus...and short busses.


Never hold a "Christian" to what the bible says. Tends to fark up their arguments.
 
2014-01-09 03:30:08 PM  

Peki: If they are that close together, that young, and that bright? My guess is we're getting closer to looking at the spot where the big bang started. Would be interesting to do the same look somewhere else and see if you get the dots again, or if they are only in one direction in the sky.

Also, where are we in reference to where the big bang happened, verses the edge of the known universe? Do we know? We seem to act like we are on the outside edge looking in, but what's in front of us?

/astronomy is awesome. Real, live time travel. . .


The big bang started where you're standing.
There wasn't any space back then. It's all ballooned out since. The reason you see the CMBR everywhere you look is because the big bang happened everywhere you look.
 
2014-01-09 03:34:13 PM  
Here's what I don't get about all this - and this is not a critique, just a mystery.

FTA:
"And it turns out all four really are ridiculously far from Earth; GNDJ-625 is something like 13.2 billion light years away. In other words, we're seeing it when the Universe itself was only about 600 million years old."

OK. So we can see the light of GNDJ-625 at 13.2 BLY. Given that currently we're "ahead" of it in timespace, where is the light from GNDJ-625 from 10BLY ago or 8BLY ago. Shouldn't we see where it "is" (or better, "was later on")? Maybe we do as one of the many other spots of light in the image. I'm not sure we can be that certain that each item in the image is a distinct galaxy -- or at least, from among a collection of photos.

Hmmmm. I dunno.
 
2014-01-09 03:38:32 PM  

mootmah: Stone Meadow: mootmah: But of course, we're the only life in the universe.

Nonsense. The bibble doesn't say that at all. It just says we're special because Jeebus...and short busses.

Never hold a "Christian" to what the bible says. Tends to fark up their arguments.


Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)
 
2014-01-09 03:40:02 PM  

SordidEuphemism: Peki: If they are that close together, that young, and that bright? My guess is we're getting closer to looking at the spot where the big bang started. Would be interesting to do the same look somewhere else and see if you get the dots again, or if they are only in one direction in the sky.

Also, where are we in reference to where the big bang happened, verses the edge of the known universe? Do we know? We seem to act like we are on the outside edge looking in, but what's in front of us?

/astronomy is awesome. Real, live time travel. . .

The big bang started where you're standing.
There wasn't any space back then. It's all ballooned out since. The reason you see the CMBR everywhere you look is because the big bang happened everywhere you look.


What's amazing is that the level of complexity looking inward is nearly the same. Unreal.
 
2014-01-09 03:42:46 PM  

Jodeo: Here's what I don't get about all this - and this is not a critique, just a mystery.

FTA:
"And it turns out all four really are ridiculously far from Earth; GNDJ-625 is something like 13.2 billion light years away. In other words, we're seeing it when the Universe itself was only about 600 million years old."

OK. So we can see the light of GNDJ-625 at 13.2 BLY. Given that currently we're "ahead" of it in timespace, where is the light from GNDJ-625 from 10BLY ago or 8BLY ago. Shouldn't we see where it "is" (or better, "was later on")? Maybe we do as one of the many other spots of light in the image. I'm not sure we can be that certain that each item in the image is a distinct galaxy -- or at least, from among a collection of photos.

Hmmmm. I dunno.


We can't see that light because it hasn't gotten to us yet. We can't look into the future.  We have to wait for the last 13 billion years of that galaxy one day at a time.  Is that right?
 
2014-01-09 03:44:18 PM  

Stone Meadow: laulaja: "Bill-yuns & bill-yuns of 'em." -- Carl Sagan in Cosmos, prod 1978-89, aired 1980 on PBS stations (only recalled he said, GoodSearched rest!)

What's the current estimate of the number of galaxies? I didn't see it mentioned in TFA.


~~This is a difficult number to know for certain, since we can only see a fraction of the Universe, even with our most powerful instruments. The most current estimates guess that there are 100 to 200 billion galaxies in the Universe, each of which has hundreds of billions of stars. A recent German supercomputer simulation put that number even higher: 500 billion. In other words, there could be a galaxy out there for every star in the Milky Way.
Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/30305/how-many-galaxies-in-the-universe/ # ixzz2pw6Qwzkz
 
2014-01-09 03:45:32 PM  

Seat's Taken: Jodeo: Here's what I don't get about all this - and this is not a critique, just a mystery.

FTA:
"And it turns out all four really are ridiculously far from Earth; GNDJ-625 is something like 13.2 billion light years away. In other words, we're seeing it when the Universe itself was only about 600 million years old."

OK. So we can see the light of GNDJ-625 at 13.2 BLY. Given that currently we're "ahead" of it in timespace, where is the light from GNDJ-625 from 10BLY ago or 8BLY ago. Shouldn't we see where it "is" (or better, "was later on")? Maybe we do as one of the many other spots of light in the image. I'm not sure we can be that certain that each item in the image is a distinct galaxy -- or at least, from among a collection of photos.

Hmmmm. I dunno.

We can't see that light because it hasn't gotten to us yet. We can't look into the future.  We have to wait for the last 13 billion years of that galaxy one day at a time.  Is that right?


Correct.
 
2014-01-09 03:46:37 PM  

Seat's Taken: Jodeo: Here's what I don't get about all this - and this is not a critique, just a mystery.

FTA:
"And it turns out all four really are ridiculously far from Earth; GNDJ-625 is something like 13.2 billion light years away. In other words, we're seeing it when the Universe itself was only about 600 million years old."

OK. So we can see the light of GNDJ-625 at 13.2 BLY. Given that currently we're "ahead" of it in timespace, where is the light from GNDJ-625 from 10BLY ago or 8BLY ago. Shouldn't we see where it "is" (or better, "was later on")? Maybe we do as one of the many other spots of light in the image. I'm not sure we can be that certain that each item in the image is a distinct galaxy -- or at least, from among a collection of photos.

Hmmmm. I dunno.

We can't see that light because it hasn't gotten to us yet. We can't look into the future.  We have to wait for the last 13 billion years of that galaxy one day at a time.  Is that right?


That's right. Like a water hose. The water leaving the spigot today has to travel the length of the hose before it reaches us in 13 billion years. Or longer, as (and this is fun) because if that light is being redshifted to that degree, then that galaxy is most likely more than 13 billion years away now. Remember - speed of light is not a limit on the expansion rate of the universe, and everything gets carried along with it.
 
2014-01-09 03:50:27 PM  

SordidEuphemism: Seat's Taken: Jodeo: Here's what I don't get about all this - and this is not a critique, just a mystery.

FTA:
"And it turns out all four really are ridiculously far from Earth; GNDJ-625 is something like 13.2 billion light years away. In other words, we're seeing it when the Universe itself was only about 600 million years old."

OK. So we can see the light of GNDJ-625 at 13.2 BLY. Given that currently we're "ahead" of it in timespace, where is the light from GNDJ-625 from 10BLY ago or 8BLY ago. Shouldn't we see where it "is" (or better, "was later on")? Maybe we do as one of the many other spots of light in the image. I'm not sure we can be that certain that each item in the image is a distinct galaxy -- or at least, from among a collection of photos.

Hmmmm. I dunno.

We can't see that light because it hasn't gotten to us yet. We can't look into the future.  We have to wait for the last 13 billion years of that galaxy one day at a time.  Is that right?

That's right. Like a water hose. The water leaving the spigot today has to travel the length of the hose before it reaches us in 13 billion years. Or longer, as (and this is fun) because if that light is being redshifted to that degree, then that galaxy is most likely more than 13 billion years away now. Remember - speed of light is not a limit on the expansion rate of the universe, and everything gets carried along with it.


Can you explain how the expansion isn't limited by the speed of light, other than the fact that theoretically, two objects can depart each other at nearly double the SOL?
 
2014-01-09 03:50:56 PM  

StopLurkListen: Stone Meadow: laulaja: "Bill-yuns & bill-yuns of 'em." -- Carl Sagan in Cosmos, prod 1978-89, aired 1980 on PBS stations (only recalled he said, GoodSearched rest!)

What's the current estimate of the number of galaxies? I didn't see it mentioned in TFA.

~~This is a difficult number to know for certain, since we can only see a fraction of the Universe, even with our most powerful instruments. The most current estimates guess that there are 100 to 200 billion galaxies in the Universe, each of which has hundreds of billions of stars. A recent German supercomputer simulation put that number even higher: 500 billion. In other words, there could be a galaxy out there for every star in the Milky Way.
Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/30305/how-many-galaxies-in-the-universe/ # ixzz2pw6Qwzkz


Wow...pale blue dot, indeed!
 
2014-01-09 03:52:47 PM  

mootmah: Can you explain how the expansion isn't limited by the speed of light, other than the fact that theoretically, two objects can depart each other at nearly double the SOL?


The short answer(as I understand it) is that the speed of light is only an absolute limit inside the universe.
 
2014-01-09 03:53:14 PM  
Stone Meadow:
Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)

Gotta admit it's amusing to know folks who believe these words are inspired by The Supreme Being, who says "my thoughts are not your thoughts" etc., and yet they think they know exactly what everything means based on one or two superficial readings.
 
2014-01-09 03:53:59 PM  

Voiceofreason01: mootmah: Can you explain how the expansion isn't limited by the speed of light, other than the fact that theoretically, two objects can depart each other at nearly double the SOL?

The short answer(as I understand it) is that the speed of light is only an absolute limit inside the universe.


Where can I find the long answer?
 
2014-01-09 03:57:25 PM  

Stone Meadow: mootmah: Stone Meadow: mootmah: But of course, we're the only life in the universe.

Nonsense. The bibble doesn't say that at all. It just says we're special because Jeebus...and short busses.

Never hold a "Christian" to what the bible says. Tends to fark up their arguments.

Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)


As a former Catholic and current Deist....
.... yes.
 
2014-01-09 03:58:01 PM  
I love the Hubble so much. It's one of my favorite things about being alive and human.

But it freaks me out that we can't see beyond the tip of our own nose to know what's going on out there right now. All we know is what a fraction of the universe used to look like.

We'll never see them coming.
 
2014-01-09 03:59:01 PM  

Galactica Actual: I love the Hubble so much. It's one of my favorite things about being alive and human.

But it freaks me out that we can't see beyond the tip of our own nose to know what's going on out there right now. All we know is what a fraction of the universe used to look like.

We'll never see them coming.


What do you suppose the odds are of them choosing us?
 
2014-01-09 04:07:37 PM  

mootmah: What do you suppose the odds are of them choosing us?


In this economy? Not very likely.
 
2014-01-09 04:10:55 PM  

mootmah: Voiceofreason01: mootmah: Can you explain how the expansion isn't limited by the speed of light, other than the fact that theoretically, two objects can depart each other at nearly double the SOL?

The short answer(as I understand it) is that the speed of light is only an absolute limit inside the universe.

Where can I find the long answer?


I found this from here:

How can the Universe expand faster than the speed of light during inflation?
Some sources indicate that the big bang caused an expansion which traveled faster than the speed of light. How can this be?
You ask a good question, one whose answer lies in the subtle difference between expansion that is faster than the speed of light and the propagation of information that is faster than the speed of light. The latter is forbidden by fundamental physical laws, but the former is allowed; that is, as long as you are not transmitting any information (like a light pulse), you can make something happen at a speed that is faster than that of light. The expansion of the Universe is a "growth" of the spacetime itself; this spacetime may move faster than the speed of light relative to some other location, as long as the two locations can't communicate with each other (or, in terms of light rays, these two parts of the Universe can't see each other). According to the theory of inflation, the Universe grew by a factor of 10 to the sixtieth power in less than 10 to the negative thirty seconds, so the "edges" of the Universe were expanding away from each other faster than the speed of light; however, as long as those edges can't see each other (which is what we always assume), there is no physical law that forbids it.


I also found this from there too.
 
2014-01-09 04:11:10 PM  

mootmah: Voiceofreason01: mootmah: Can you explain how the expansion isn't limited by the speed of light, other than the fact that theoretically, two objects can depart each other at nearly double the SOL?

The short answer(as I understand it) is that the speed of light is only an absolute limit inside the universe.

Where can I find the long answer?


The long answer is going to be expressed in math that is way beyond me. There are probably people here who can give you a more complete answer in layman's terms. Occasionally Phil(he author of the article) will show up in these threads and he could give a better explanation. This article and i's references can help give you an idea.
 
2014-01-09 04:16:08 PM  

DECMATH: Stone Meadow:
Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)

Gotta admit it's amusing to know folks who believe these words are inspired by The Supreme Being, who says "my thoughts are not your thoughts" etc., and yet they think they know exactly what everything means based on one or two superficial readings.


Maybe so, but it seems to me that even a superficial reading would turn that up, but no...she insisted there was only One God (sort of a mashup of Yahweh and Jesus...or something). She was completely immune to the proposition that Yahweh and Israel are bound by a covenant under which Yahweh will protect Israel, and Israel in turn will not worship other gods (from wiki), and that under the OT rules, other tribes had other Gods that Jews had to be respectful of, but who took second fiddle to Yahweh.

She completely rejects that interpretation and claims that Jesus is the One Universal God for everybody, everywhere. Catholics are Idolterators. Muslims are pagans who follow a "made up" religion. Mormons, Jehovah Witnesses, Buddhists, Atheists, etc.? Pagans all, who will roast in hell's eternal flames. Cute, eh? ;^)
 
2014-01-09 04:18:54 PM  

mootmah: Voiceofreason01: mootmah: Can you explain how the expansion isn't limited by the speed of light, other than the fact that theoretically, two objects can depart each other at nearly double the SOL?

The short answer(as I understand it) is that the speed of light is only an absolute limit inside the universe.

Where can I find the long answer?


Time Dilation and Expanding Universe wikipedia articles are comprehensive and more accurate than most other sources. The "two points drawn on a balloon moving apart as the balloon is blown up" analogy also works for visualization.

Also, technically two objects moving apart from each other don't move apart from each other at 2c--from each object's frame of reference, the other is moving away at only c. See the Time Dilation reference above, as well as this article.

/Relativistic physics can really play games with our puny classical minds.
 
2014-01-09 04:29:18 PM  
It's a great big universe
And we're all really puny
Just tiny little specks
About the size of Mickey Rooney
It's a big universe
And we're not!
 
2014-01-09 04:32:01 PM  

WippitGuud: Stone Meadow: Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)

As a former Catholic and current Deist....
.... yes.


You're the first deist I've encountered who publically accepts this interpretation, though it was obvious to me from my first reading of the OT, which is full of references to other Gods. She also rejected my suggestion that if she was serious about her Yahweh-centric monotheism that she needed to convert to Judaism, because as it was she was a light-weight. Yeah, that went over well... ;^)
 
2014-01-09 04:33:16 PM  

mootmah: What do you suppose the odds are of them choosing us?


Choosing the earth for its remaining resources: 50-50.
Us: 1-999,999,999,999
 
2014-01-09 04:37:09 PM  

acohn: mootmah: What do you suppose the odds are of them choosing us?

Choosing the earth for its remaining resources: 50-50.
Us: 1-999,999,999,999


I thought we were the ideal spot to put a traffic light, or some shiat like that.
 
2014-01-09 04:42:33 PM  

Stone Meadow: acohn: mootmah: What do you suppose the odds are of them choosing us?

Choosing the earth for its remaining resources: 50-50.
Us: 1-999,999,999,999

I thought we were the ideal spot to put a traffic light, or some shiat like that.


Technically, we have a natural wonder going for us. We have an oddly large moon that just happens to be at the right angle and distance to create really spectacular eclipses.
 
2014-01-09 04:50:50 PM  

Half Right: mootmah: Voiceofreason01: mootmah: Can you explain how the expansion isn't limited by the speed of light, other than the fact that theoretically, two objects can depart each other at nearly double the SOL?

The short answer(as I understand it) is that the speed of light is only an absolute limit inside the universe.

Where can I find the long answer?

Time Dilation and Expanding Universe wikipedia articles are comprehensive and more accurate than most other sources. The "two points drawn on a balloon moving apart as the balloon is blown up" analogy also works for visualization.

Also, technically two objects moving apart from each other don't move apart from each other at 2c--from each object's frame of reference, the other is moving away at only c. See the Time Dilation reference above, as well as this article.

/Relativistic physics can really play games with our puny classical minds.


OW! My brain!
 
2014-01-09 04:56:23 PM  
Basically, the speed of light limit only applies to stuff moving through space. There's no limit to how fast space itself can expand. This is why a warp drive would allow us to travel faster than light - we'd simply be expanding space behind the vessel and shrinking space in front of the vessel FTL.
 
2014-01-09 05:30:55 PM  

Half Right: /Relativistic physics can really play games with our puny classical minds.


See, my brain exploded just trying to understand the articles.

On the time dilation article, my thought was, "So is that one of the reasons why active people live longer? They're literally aging slower?" However, that's probably the best motivation I've had so far to start exercising, so there's a plus at least.

Space expansion: Yeah, I don't think I have a rat's chance in hell of understanding that. I'm such a liner thinker. It's changing distance without moving! *pop goes my head*

I can barely handle Klein bottles as far as geometry goes. I get that the universe is like a balloon that's expanding, but is it hollow? What's in the middle, all the dark matter? All the galaxies on the surface of the balloon or everything mixed together? It sounds almost like science thinks that the galaxies all came exploding from the Big Bang fully formed, like Athena from Zeus' head, without a thought about what the universe may have looked like that many years ago, all scrunched (I'm not talking about at the moment of the Big Bang or before, but immediately right after, which is roughly where they are pegging these objects).

Also: Is it possible in astronomy to see an afterimage of the same object, both images existing in our night sky? For example, a galaxy is moving towards us, and the light is 13 billion years old. Since space can expand faster than light, would it be possible to see another image of the same galaxy that's only 10 billion years old? Maybe another at 5? Would scientists be able to tell?

/so many questions, not enough money for classes
 
2014-01-09 05:46:41 PM  
Can we just rename the Hubble the Total Perspective Vortex already?
 
2014-01-09 05:52:19 PM  

Stone Meadow: mootmah: Stone Meadow: mootmah: But of course, we're the only life in the universe.

Nonsense. The bibble doesn't say that at all. It just says we're special because Jeebus...and short busses.

Never hold a "Christian" to what the bible says. Tends to fark up their arguments.

Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)


I grew up in the Mormon church. The whole point of getting to the Celestial Kingdom is that you will be able to become a God yourself and create a populated world such this that we live on.

Also, according to this story today, the universe is infinite:

http://www.isciencetimes.com/articles/6651/20140109/universe-measure d- perfect-accuracy-infinite-flat-eternal.htm
 
2014-01-09 05:55:02 PM  

Stone Meadow: DECMATH: Stone Meadow:
Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)

Gotta admit it's amusing to know folks who believe these words are inspired by The Supreme Being, who says "my thoughts are not your thoughts" etc., and yet they think they know exactly what everything means based on one or two superficial readings.

Maybe so, but it seems to me that even a superficial reading would turn that up, but no...she insisted there was only One God (sort of a mashup of Yahweh and Jesus...or something). She was completely immune to the proposition that Yahweh and Israel are bound by a covenant under which Yahweh will protect Israel, and Israel in turn will not worship other gods (from wiki), and that under the OT rules, other tribes had other Gods that Jews had to be respectful of, but who took second fiddle to Yahweh.

She completely rejects that interpretation and claims that Jesus is the One Universal God for everybody, everywhere. Catholics are Idolterators. Muslims are pagans who follow a "made up" religion. Mormons, Jehovah Witnesses, Buddhists, Atheists, etc.? Pagans all, who will roast in hell's eternal flames. Cute, eh? ;^)


She sounds like an old-timey Church of Christ lady. I can remember being about 4 or 5 when she vividly described how I was going to burn in the everlasting flames of hell because my mother took me to the Mormon church. Nice stuff, huh?
 
2014-01-09 05:55:50 PM  
Sorry. The "she" I was referring to was my maternal grandmother.
 
2014-01-09 05:57:35 PM  

happydude45: Stone Meadow: mootmah: Stone Meadow: mootmah: But of course, we're the only life in the universe.

Nonsense. The bibble doesn't say that at all. It just says we're special because Jeebus...and short busses.

Never hold a "Christian" to what the bible says. Tends to fark up their arguments.

Yeah,,,LOL. I once pointed out to a fundie cousin, whom I don't particularly care for, that one of the commandments says, "You shall have no other gods before me", which implied that there were other Gods. She about blew a gasket. :)

I grew up in the Mormon church. The whole point of getting to the Celestial Kingdom is that you will be able to become a God yourself and create a populated world such this that we live on.

Also, according to this story today, the universe is infinite:

http://www.isciencetimes.com/articles/6651/20140109/universe-measure d- perfect-accuracy-infinite-flat-eternal.htm


"Near Perfect" precision allows an error of about a billion light years according to TFA
 
2014-01-09 05:57:57 PM  

Galactica Actual: But it freaks me out that we can't see beyond the tip of our own nose to know what's going on out there right now. All we know is what a fraction of the universe used to look like.


And as time goes by, distant objects will continue to move farther and farther away.  Eventually, they are going to move away from us at a rate faster than light can travel.

Billions of years from now, when you look outside of our galaxy, all you will see will be darkness.
 
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