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(CNN)   Glowing fish baffles scientists. Dr. Sheldon Cooper seen slinking away from the scene   (cnn.com) divider line 10
    More: Cool, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, fluorescent protein, Bioluminescence, American Museum of Natural History, fish, fluorescent light, orange, terrestrial animal  
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1693 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jan 2014 at 11:07 AM (14 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



10 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-09 11:22:33 AM
Probably just swam too close to New Jersey.
 
2014-01-09 11:23:33 AM
I wish it read,
Glowing fish battle scientists!
 
2014-01-09 11:43:22 AM
Does it have three eyes?
 
2014-01-09 11:56:07 AM

Space Station Wagon: I wish it read,
Glowing fish battle scientists!


GODDAMMIT!  Stop giving what used to be the "Sci-Fi Channel" ideas.
 
2014-01-09 12:40:30 PM
24.media.tumblr.com

/Oblig
 
2014-01-09 01:12:55 PM
Www.glofish.com anyone? Really?
 
2014-01-09 01:22:43 PM
web.mit.edu
 
2014-01-09 08:13:38 PM
Fish are incredible.  Sea organisms in general, particularly those from tropical regions are astounding.  The colors on some of those fish are like technicolor drug induced hallucinations.

The ones that I'm most curious about are the fish that fluoresce in reddish hues.  It's my understanding that most sea creatures actually can't detect red light, so what purpose would it serve?
 
2014-01-10 09:37:57 AM

MrHappyRotter: Fish are incredible.  Sea organisms in general, particularly those from tropical regions are astounding.  The colors on some of those fish are like technicolor drug induced hallucinations.

The ones that I'm most curious about are the fish that fluoresce in reddish hues.  It's my understanding that most sea creatures actually can't detect red light, so what purpose would it serve?

 
2014-01-10 09:41:28 AM

MrHappyRotter: Fish are incredible.  Sea organisms in general, particularly those from tropical regions are astounding.  The colors on some of those fish are like technicolor drug induced hallucinations.

The ones that I'm most curious about are the fish that fluoresce in reddish hues.  It's my understanding that most sea creatures actually can't detect red light, so what purpose would it serve?


Damn laptop... sorry!

I might not be remembering this correctly but I remember a professor telling me that the deeper you go in water the more lower wavelength colors get filtered out.  Since red goes first maybe it is working as a camoflauging mechanism?
 
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