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(WREX Rockford)   A third of Illinois homes are "deeply underwater" which means you can probably go skating from the second story window at the moment   (wrex.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, complaints, RealtyTrac, Illinois  
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1324 clicks; posted to Business » on 09 Jan 2014 at 12:57 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-09 01:06:02 PM  
I thought most homes in the area had sump pumps.
 
2014-01-09 01:11:24 PM  

Nadie_AZ: I thought most homes in the area had sump pumps.


While looking for a house in New York, I automatically disqualified any house that contained a sump pump.

If the foundation isn't good enough to keep water out, you're looking at very expensive fixes down the road.
 
2014-01-09 01:20:01 PM  
Our home is about 100 years old and when they dug the basement they took care not to go below the water table.
We have no sump pump, never had flooding.

Next door a developer demo'ed an old house, put up two townhouses and dug down deep to put in 9ft basements.
Put in sump pumps too.
Revolving door of owners also includes mysterious bags of trash and broken up piles of drywall and carpeting every Spring.
One of the For Sale pics for one unit showed the basement which was completely empty except for a treadmill and an old TV on a milk crate.  So much for the rec room or home theater!

/this is now a sump pump thread
 
2014-01-09 01:23:10 PM  
In other news 1/3 of homes in Illinois are luxury 2 flat condos in Chicago that sold to the 1% for $1/2 million and up.
 
2014-01-09 01:31:55 PM  
50% equity is "equity rich"? Really? Sheesh.
 
2014-01-09 01:56:47 PM  

FormlessOne: 50% equity is "equity rich"? Really? Sheesh.


This is America.  If I want to buy a house I can't afford with money I don't have and then refinance it over and over again, THAT'S MY RIGHT.  Also, it's the bank's fault, WHAR JOBS, and boy I'd love to be able to save money but I CAN'T AFFORD TO
 
2014-01-09 03:30:53 PM  

FormlessOne: 50% equity is "equity rich"? Really? Sheesh.


I'M RICH, BIATCHES!

//While it lasts.
///About to get a new 2nd for home repair and improvement.
 
2014-01-09 04:25:18 PM  

Johnson: Next door a developer demo'ed an old house, put up two townhouses and dug down deep to put in 9ft basements.


If you can make a swimming pool hold water, I'm curious why a basement can't be made to keep out water (other than because people are cheap).
 
2014-01-09 04:48:47 PM  

Dinjiin: Johnson: Next door a developer demo'ed an old house, put up two townhouses and dug down deep to put in 9ft basements.

If you can make a swimming pool hold water, I'm curious why a basement can't be made to keep out water (other than because people are cheap).


It can be waterproof to an extent. The foundation can be waterproofed well with multiple layers, but you still need a drainage system and sump pump. Water pressure on a 12 foot wall can get pretty high and water will find a way in. Watch Holmes on Homes.
 
2014-01-09 05:29:20 PM  

Dinjiin: Johnson: Next door a developer demo'ed an old house, put up two townhouses and dug down deep to put in 9ft basements.

If you can make a swimming pool hold water, I'm curious why a basement can't be made to keep out water (other than because people are cheap).


Because a basement wall and floor has one side that is surrounded by dirt. Dirt by it's very nature will shift gradual over time do to water and weather. This puts enormous pressure on a wall which has one side that has no load bearing against it. Eventually the wall will crack or even bow in allowing water to seep into the basement.

Not to mention that most plumbing is placed underground, in the case of a house with a basement that means it is under the freaking house, so if sewers get backed up, say from excess water, guess where that sewage is going to end up. Now houses with out basements occasionally have that problem too, but basements are just trouble magnets waiting to happen. Particularly in places with high water tables.
 
2014-01-09 05:38:14 PM  

Slaves2Darkness: Because a basement wall and floor has one side that is surrounded by dirt. Dirt by it's very nature will shift gradual over time do to water and weather. This puts enormous pressure on a wall which has one side that has no load bearing against it. Eventually the wall will crack or even bow in allowing water to seep into the basement.


I always though it was bad practice to backfill around the basement foundation with dirt.  Instead, you're supposed to use well draining rock in combination with a perforated drain pipe that runs off to a dry well.
 
2014-01-09 05:56:02 PM  
If you have a basement, and you live in a place that gets heavy rains, your basement will leak eventually. That's just how it is.

I find it hilarious that people get SO bent out of shape about this fact. Yes, you probably *could* build a leak-proof basement, if you wanted to. It would likely add another $30k to the cost of the house, which is why nobody does it.
 
2014-01-09 06:06:46 PM  

Dinjiin: If you can make a swimming pool hold water, I'm curious why a basement can't be made to keep out water (other than because people are cheap).


Your first clause is presuming quite a lot.  A large home/hotel sized pool exfiltrates hundreds of gallons of water into the surrounding soil every day (it's not all just evaporation).
 
2014-01-09 06:55:11 PM  
No surprise it's a report from a Rockford station. I'm sure that one third of the one third of Illinois homes that are underwater are in Rockford.
 
2014-01-09 07:13:42 PM  

germ78: No surprise it's a report from a Rockford station. I'm sure that one third of the one third of Illinois homes that are underwater are in Rockford.


No shiat. Rockford and the surrounding area is a farking toilet.
 
2014-01-09 07:24:11 PM  
Live in Illinois and paid the old manse off last year, so that must mean I'm super real estate rich and all 1%'ty.  I must be taxed moar, for the chillens. TAX ME MOAR!
 
2014-01-09 08:43:59 PM  

Dinjiin: Slaves2Darkness: Because a basement wall and floor has one side that is surrounded by dirt. Dirt by it's very nature will shift gradual over time do to water and weather. This puts enormous pressure on a wall which has one side that has no load bearing against it. Eventually the wall will crack or even bow in allowing water to seep into the basement.

I always though it was bad practice to backfill around the basement foundation with dirt.  Instead, you're supposed to use well draining rock in combination with a perforated drain pipe that runs off to a dry well.


That's what we did with my parents house. Around the entire house. No more flooding problems.

/They live on a hill, so not so much a water table issue as it was drainage.
 
2014-01-09 09:11:10 PM  
We live on fractured granite. No sump, one miniscule emergency drain. We have an up-pump for the utility sink.

shiat, they had to blast to be able to put the basement in.

A few years ago, there was significant flooding in the area, and our home insurance company took it upon themselves to attach a flood rider to our policy. "Oh," said they, "but we thought you'd want it after all the trouble everyone had." They are now our ex-insurance company, because they basically failed at geology.
 
2014-01-09 09:38:59 PM  
I'm underwater because all these other people couldn't afford their homes. Within two blocks of my house, there are three or four abandoned houses and at least two straight-up bank owned.

/We're not as underwater as some of these folks
//Bought much lower than the market rate at the time.
///Property assessment just went down another 13k, so I got that going for me.
////Slashies will never go down in value.
 
2014-01-10 10:32:27 AM  

Dinjiin: Slaves2Darkness: Because a basement wall and floor has one side that is surrounded by dirt. Dirt by it's very nature will shift gradual over time do to water and weather. This puts enormous pressure on a wall which has one side that has no load bearing against it. Eventually the wall will crack or even bow in allowing water to seep into the basement.

I always though it was bad practice to backfill around the basement foundation with dirt.  Instead, you're supposed to use well draining rock in combination with a perforated drain pipe that runs off to a dry well.


That's a version of a French drain.  In lots of cases they work great, but they are in no way a cure all.  You can run them under the basement too, but that won't stop water from raising up.  Remember, the main purpose of a basement is not to keep water out, but to keep the building up.

And if water gets into your concrete and starts freezing/thawing... the water will eventually win.  Actually, water always wins in the long run (see: Grand Canyon).
 
2014-01-10 10:33:45 AM  

Needlessly Complicated: germ78: No surprise it's a report from a Rockford station. I'm sure that one third of the one third of Illinois homes that are underwater are in Rockford.

No shiat. Rockford and the surrounding area is a farking toilet.


Hey now, I grew up in that surrounding area.

I mean, you are right, but still.
 
2014-01-10 01:26:24 PM  

bacongood: That's a version of a French drain. In lots of cases they work great, but they are in no way a cure all. You can run them under the basement too, but that won't stop water from raising up. Remember, the main purpose of a basement is not to keep water out, but to keep the building up.


As long as you're not building a couple of feet above the water table, I would think that a good foundation drain and proper routing of downspout water away from the house would be sufficient.
 
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