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(MSN)   "You sold my house for $288 in HOA fees?" "Well, maybe if you bothered to open one of the 30 notices we'd sent you or read the contract you signed when you bought the house, you wouldn't have this problem"   (news.msn.com) divider line 301
    More: Followup, HOA, homeowners associations, debt settlement, Community Associations Institute, fees  
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16787 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jan 2014 at 9:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-08 10:28:02 PM  

cuzsis: drumhellar: cuzsis: Also, how the fark can they legally take a home worth $120,000 for $288?

Seems like they owe her $119,712...

They don't keep all the money - just the fine + the cost of forcing a foreclosure. Of course, if she had a mortgage to pay, the rest of the money would go to the bank to pay the mortgage. Since the house is usually sold at auction for a lot less than it's worth, the former owner is on the hook for the remainder. In her case, it's $30,000.

Agreeing to sell the house for less than it was worth is their problem/stupidity. It doesn't change what the house was worth as an asset to both the bank the homeowner. And that was made by a professional assessment by the county and/or bank when she bought the house. This means they essentially "stole" money from her. And it was a hell of a lot more than $288.

Perhaps she can sell their houses now?

 It would be like if someone took your car, sold it for $12 and gave you the $12 as "payment" for the car. Pretty sure you'd throw their ass in jail for felonious theft, yes?

 /I'm not saying the home owner isn't stupid, she definitely is, but in this case the HOA is the greater of the two....by a lot.


Try not paying your car payment and see what happens.
 
2014-01-08 10:28:04 PM  

you are a puppet: cuzsis: HindiDiscoMonster: cuzsis: you are a puppet: ReapTheChaos: I don't give a shiat what a contract says, an HOA should not be able to foreclose on any home for any reason. They can take the person to court and garnish their wages if necessary, but taking their home is simply farked up.

Agreed. Place a farking lien on it you shiatbags

This.

 Also, how the fark can they legally take a home worth $120,000 for $288?

 Seems like they owe her $119,712...

/she should sue

they are going to do that to the wrong person sometime and we're going to read about a mass murder of all HOA board members.

/no great loss.... should be an interesting thread though.

Well as long as the murderer sends "plenty of notice" I think most people will be fine with it. 

/at least that's the vibe I get from some people on here.

Sometimes people don't see the point in differentiating between what is legal and what is just. But yeah, this thread has Milgram experiment written all over it.


Indeed.

/which is creepy as fark honestly.
 
2014-01-08 10:29:04 PM  

Derwood: LOL at a bunch of apartment dwellers lashing out at HOA's. You pay hundreds a month to follow rules and don't even have any equity to show for it


Heh, that was just sad
 
2014-01-08 10:30:00 PM  
I swear to god I will pistol whip the next person who says "HOA's"
 
2014-01-08 10:30:04 PM  
I have two houses in a HOA area, I am getting a kick out of these replies to burn HOA!!! Actually if she didn't ignore her letters and calls, she would of paid the $300 and all would of been well.
 
2014-01-08 10:31:29 PM  

Headso: HOAs are for those that look at all the laws and rules in America and boldly say "No, that's not enough, I need more people to have authority over me"


Only dumbasses and wannabe nazis buy into HOAs so I have no sympathy for them or their dumbass fascist ways
 
2014-01-08 10:33:04 PM  

cuzsis: you are a puppet: ReapTheChaos: I don't give a shiat what a contract says, an HOA should not be able to foreclose on any home for any reason. They can take the person to court and garnish their wages if necessary, but taking their home is simply farked up.

Agreed. Place a farking lien on it you shiatbags

This.

 Also, how the fark can they legally take a home worth $120,000 for $288?

 Seems like they owe her $119,712...

/she should sue


The article didn't say, but this is what I'm going to assume happened: The HOA foreclosed and sold the home at auction. At auction, it could have gone for 20,000 or it could have gone for 100,000... it doesn't say. The owner probably got the remainder after the HOA fees were taken out, but if she had a mortgage, it probably didn't cover it. At the end of the day, I doubt she is $120,000 in the hole. I bet she is more between $20,000 and $60,000 in the hole.
 
2014-01-08 10:33:22 PM  

Nightjars: She failed to pay your bills or bother to open your mail after moving into a neighborhood with an HOA.  There are so many steps along the way that she could caused this to never occur, no matter how unjust that such a thing is possible for an HOA to do - I am certainly in the camp who feels that the worst they should be able to do is sue you for the amount owed, plus legal fees, and put a lien on your property (or a wage garnishment, or whatever other legal options that they may have to collect.)


i guess the question is, what options did they have? is the HOA's only legal recourse to foreclose? i'm not sure they would have the power to garnish wages, and putting a lien doesn't solve the problem (paying for the plow guy/road repairs/park/pool whatever.)
 
2014-01-08 10:33:28 PM  

eatin' fetus: /primal scream
//AAAUUUUUUUGGGGGHHHHH


And I can't believe that you can't recognize a tpyo when you see one.

/yikes, I did it agian
//adn again
//I'll stop now.
 
2014-01-08 10:33:55 PM  

Fast Talkin Fanny: Don't like HOAs? Don't move to a neighborhood that has one.


Fair enough...

/ I'm too "rural" to be a good fit in one, anyways
 
2014-01-08 10:35:37 PM  

drumhellar: They don't keep all the money - just the fine + the cost of forcing a foreclosure. Of course, if she had a mortgage to pay, the rest of the money would go to the bank to pay the mortgage. Since the house is usually sold at auction for a lot less than it's worth, the former owner is on the hook for the remainder. In her case, it's $30,000.


Oh, see, I got bored when they started going over the history of HOAs. Glad to see my guess what right.
 
2014-01-08 10:35:43 PM  
No one on the HOA could have called her? My condo management company sends me two letters a year; one announcing the annual meetting and one telling me the results of the annual meeting. Those I open immediately. Any other ones I open & read right at the mailbox. It ain't hard.
 
2014-01-08 10:37:37 PM  

Misconduc: I have two houses in a HOA area, I am getting a kick out of these replies to burn HOA!!! Actually if she didn't ignore her letters and calls, she would of paid the $300 and all would of been well.


If you just let your pimp rape you, he won't have to choke a biatch.
 
2014-01-08 10:37:50 PM  

Sudlow: No one on the HOA could have called her?


She couldn't have opened her pounds and pounds of mail?
 
2014-01-08 10:38:42 PM  

HAMMERTOE: What exactly happens if you refuse to sign the contract they offer?


The contract is basically a rider attached to the title on the property. If you don't sign the contract, then you haven't signed the title, and the sale doesn't exist.

jaytkay: Enjoy, dumbass. You signed the contract.

99.99% of people on Earth live without an HOA.


Incorrect. The article claims that 63 million Americans do. Assuming 7 billion people on Earth, that's about 0.9% of the planet, assuming no one else in the world does.

Anyhow, I could make the claim that anyone who rents is an even bigger dumbass. Since they have a landlord, they have even less control over where they live (and thus their life in general) than someone in an HOA does. Of course, that being said, when I look for an actual house to buy, I'm going to prefer non-HOA communities. That just wasn't feasible in my price range when I bought my current place.
 
2014-01-08 10:39:41 PM  

eatin' fetus: I swear to god I will pistol whip the next person who says "HOA's"


elder-geek.com
 
2014-01-08 10:39:56 PM  
www.byelii.com
 
2014-01-08 10:40:10 PM  
HOA or not this seems illegal. It's like selling you a can of Coke and the "contract" says if you don't pay the $0.50 within 3 days your home is now owned by Coca-Cola.  Uh, no...
 
2014-01-08 10:40:24 PM  

Misconduc: I have two houses in a HOA area, I am getting a kick out of these replies to burn HOA!!! Actually if she didn't ignore her letters and calls, she would of paid the $300 and all would of been well.


Would it of? Would it really of?
 
2014-01-08 10:40:53 PM  

MNMarkPW: cuzsis: drumhellar: cuzsis: Also, how the fark can they legally take a home worth $120,000 for $288?

Seems like they owe her $119,712...

They don't keep all the money - just the fine + the cost of forcing a foreclosure. Of course, if she had a mortgage to pay, the rest of the money would go to the bank to pay the mortgage. Since the house is usually sold at auction for a lot less than it's worth, the former owner is on the hook for the remainder. In her case, it's $30,000.

Agreeing to sell the house for less than it was worth is their problem/stupidity. It doesn't change what the house was worth as an asset to both the bank the homeowner. And that was made by a professional assessment by the county and/or bank when she bought the house. This means they essentially "stole" money from her. And it was a hell of a lot more than $288.

Perhaps she can sell their houses now?

 It would be like if someone took your car, sold it for $12 and gave you the $12 as "payment" for the car. Pretty sure you'd throw their ass in jail for felonious theft, yes?

 /I'm not saying the home owner isn't stupid, she definitely is, but in this case the HOA is the greater of the two....by a lot.

Try not paying your car payment and see what happens.


That's different. As the person collecting is the one who owned the property originally. Just like a bank foreclosing on the home that you agreed to pay for. Technically it's their property until you pay off the note.

 It's when a non-owner attempts to take the property and sell it for less than it's worth that you can argue for theft.
 
2014-01-08 10:41:00 PM  
HOAs have to be the most useless organizations ever. They only benefit the banks by making sure housing prices don't fall.
 
2014-01-08 10:41:28 PM  

Mugato: Derwood: LOL at a bunch of apartment dwellers lashing out at HOA's. You pay hundreds a month to follow rules and don't even have any equity to show for it

Heh, that was just sad


I live in an HOA, and it's no big deal. It just cracks me up how every HOA thread turns into mouth-frothing from a bunch of people who don't live in them

/I know, I know, Welcome to Fark
 
2014-01-08 10:41:40 PM  

worlddan: eatin' fetus: /primal scream
//AAAUUUUUUUGGGGGHHHHH

And I can't believe that you can't recognize a tpyo when you see one.

/yikes, I did it agian
//adn again
//I'll stop now.


A typo? No, it's severe retard syndrome.

Used to be able to ignore the apostrophe thing. Thought it would resolve itself over time. False.

Used to not even notice. Now if I'm reading some comment, and some internet tard uses an apostrophe wrong, it causes physical pain. It makes me angry. It stops me dead in my track's.
 
2014-01-08 10:42:14 PM  

EffervescingElephant: Maybe one of you Farkers with a GED in law can help me with this one - my girlfriend has a similar situation, the HOA is in the process of placing a lien on her property because of some missed payments...

She is recently divorced and moved into one of her rental properties, she notified the HOA that she was moving in there, and asked them in writing to send all correspondence to the new address, that she going through a divorce and didnt want any mail going to an ex-husband.

She missed a few payments and they tacked a notice on the door with the lien notice and the attorney representing them...the back payments are only a few hundred bucks, but the attorneys want over 3,500 in fees.

They sent all correspondence/notices to her old address, even after being told not to...is there anything she can do to fight it?


She had the postal service forward her mail?
 
2014-01-08 10:43:05 PM  

FrancoFile: EffervescingElephant: FrancoFile: EffervescingElephant: Maybe one of you Farkers with a GED in law can help me with this one - my girlfriend has a similar situation, the HOA is in the process of placing a lien on her property because of some missed payments...

She is recently divorced and moved into one of her rental properties, she notified the HOA that she was moving in there, and asked them in writing to send all correspondence to the new address, that she going through a divorce and didnt want any mail going to an ex-husband.

She missed a few payments and they tacked a notice on the door with the lien notice and the attorney representing them...the back payments are only a few hundred bucks, but the attorneys want over 3,500 in fees.

They sent all correspondence/notices to her old address, even after being told not to...is there anything she can do to fight it?

Did she send that notice registered mail?  If so, then she's got a leg to stand on.

She went to the HOA office gave them a notice in person - she paid the fees for several months with checks with the right address, and once the attorneys got involved they sent everything to the right address

She could have paid the back fees...they weren't that much, she didn't know it was being turned over to attorneys, now she has almost 4 grand in fees for less than 500 bucks in back payments

She has a divorce attorney, yes?  He ought to be able to handle this.  Mgmt company screwed up and a lawyer-to-lawyer talk should get them to back down.


Would be my advice, only don't let the divorce attorney deal with it unless he/she also knows about property laws (they are different animals). It could be that getting her own attorney involved will convince the attorneys to back down--I guarantee the management company has not given them the whole story (unless they are bottom-sucking lampreys themselves). Unless your girlfriend is being a deadbeat, there's no way a $500 collection should equal $4000 in legal fees.

Make sure she has all her correspondence to and from the HOA, including the request not to send any more mail to her old address (I hope it was in writing), and any contact between her and them once she retains counsel should only be made by her lawyer. I am not an attorney, and I am not her attorney, so I'm not giving legal advice, but her best bet is to offer to pay the back fees only AFTER the attorney contacts their attorney. Don't get roped into promises before it's all legal-like.
 
2014-01-08 10:44:11 PM  

cuzsis: MNMarkPW: cuzsis: drumhellar: cuzsis: Also, how the fark can they legally take a home worth $120,000 for $288?

Seems like they owe her $119,712...

They don't keep all the money - just the fine + the cost of forcing a foreclosure. Of course, if she had a mortgage to pay, the rest of the money would go to the bank to pay the mortgage. Since the house is usually sold at auction for a lot less than it's worth, the former owner is on the hook for the remainder. In her case, it's $30,000.

Agreeing to sell the house for less than it was worth is their problem/stupidity. It doesn't change what the house was worth as an asset to both the bank the homeowner. And that was made by a professional assessment by the county and/or bank when she bought the house. This means they essentially "stole" money from her. And it was a hell of a lot more than $288.

Perhaps she can sell their houses now?

 It would be like if someone took your car, sold it for $12 and gave you the $12 as "payment" for the car. Pretty sure you'd throw their ass in jail for felonious theft, yes?

 /I'm not saying the home owner isn't stupid, she definitely is, but in this case the HOA is the greater of the two....by a lot.

Try not paying your car payment and see what happens.

That's different. As the person collecting is the one who owned the property originally. Just like a bank foreclosing on the home that you agreed to pay for. Technically it's their property until you pay off the note.

 It's when a non-owner attempts to take the property and sell it for less than it's worth that you can argue for theft.


It's not at all different. You sign a contract for each saying that, in the event of delinquency, you grant authority for the creditor to repossess your property.

This took 6 years of her ignoring notices of the lien and delinquent payment before she lost her house. These type of things don't just happen on a whim to unsuspecting people.
 
2014-01-08 10:44:51 PM  

Derwood: Mugato: Derwood: LOL at a bunch of apartment dwellers lashing out at HOA's. You pay hundreds a month to follow rules and don't even have any equity to show for it

Heh, that was just sad

I live in an HOA, and it's no big deal. It just cracks me up how every HOA thread turns into mouth-frothing from a bunch of people who don't live in them

/I know, I know, Welcome to Fark


No, it's just sad that you have to call everyone who doesn't like HOA's "apartment dwellers" and lord over them your awesome real estate choices.

/condo dweller
// wouldn't live in an HOA if it was free
 
2014-01-08 10:45:10 PM  

SurfaceTension: HOAs have to be the most useless organizations ever. They only benefit the banks by making sure housing prices don't fall.


By that logic, they do protect values to the benefit of the owner...
 
2014-01-08 10:46:46 PM  
Why do I read these HOA stories.   Now I want to go find these people and slap them silly..
 
2014-01-08 10:46:55 PM  

SurfaceTension: HOAs have to be the most useless organizations ever. They only benefit the banks by making sure housing prices don't fall.


Doesn't that benefit also extend to the homeowner?
 
2014-01-08 10:47:31 PM  

EffervescingElephant: Maybe one of you Farkers with a GED in law can help me with this one - my girlfriend has a similar situation, the HOA is in the process of placing a lien on her property because of some missed payments...

She is recently divorced and moved into one of her rental properties, she notified the HOA that she was moving in there, and asked them in writing to send all correspondence to the new address, that she going through a divorce and didnt want any mail going to an ex-husband.

She missed a few payments and they tacked a notice on the door with the lien notice and the attorney representing them...the back payments are only a few hundred bucks, but the attorneys want over 3,500 in fees.

They sent all correspondence/notices to her old address, even after being told not to...is there anything she can do to fight it?


Should have used registered mail?
 
2014-01-08 10:49:47 PM  

alice_600: More I hear about HOAs the more I like my property in a small town with 15 acres.


Wow. 15 acres? That's a really small town!
 
2014-01-08 10:51:08 PM  
A friend of mine is on the board of a 300 unit condo association. Some of the homeowners haven't paid in years and owe 4- and 5-figure sums. That money is needed to pay for the upkeep and amenities of the property. What do you anti-HOA types propose they do, let everyone else pay their share and just let the deadbeats slide forever?
 
2014-01-08 10:51:11 PM  

Mugato: Derwood: Mugato: Derwood: LOL at a bunch of apartment dwellers lashing out at HOA's. You pay hundreds a month to follow rules and don't even have any equity to show for it

Heh, that was just sad

I live in an HOA, and it's no big deal. It just cracks me up how every HOA thread turns into mouth-frothing from a bunch of people who don't live in them

/I know, I know, Welcome to Fark

No, it's just sad that you have to call everyone who doesn't like HOA's "apartment dwellers" and lord over them your awesome real estate choices.

/condo dweller
// wouldn't live in an HOA if it was free


>:(
 
2014-01-08 10:51:44 PM  

jst3p: SurfaceTension: HOAs have to be the most useless organizations ever. They only benefit the banks by making sure housing prices don't fall.

Doesn't that benefit also extend to the homeowner?


Well that's their sole argument for their rules, their precious property values, which they extend to mean that they'r affected by the grass being a centimeter too high or the color of your house not suiting them.

/not exaggerating, saw an old bag with a ruler coming around to everyone's lawn in my dad's neighborhood
 
TWX
2014-01-08 10:51:57 PM  
HOAs can be disbanded.

HOAs can be disbanded.

Admittedly this is not an easy process, requires at least half of the property owners to agree (and could require an even higher percentage) and could cause municipal taxes to increase if the city ends up taking over public spaces.

We looked at a house in a sixteen property development, still partially unsold. We were almost ready to offer on it, but then we decided to read the entire HOA rules, and found 48 pages of restrictions, and that's not even getting into possible extra rules. There was a 'disband the HOA' clause, but it required something like over 60% of owners to agree, and since the unsold plots still were owned by the developer and counted as a vote each (and likely against) it looked unlikely that the HOA could be terminated in any practical sense. We decided to not offer on it.

We found another house, less than a quarter-mile away, admittedly 30 years older, but bigger, with the detached workshop built with the house when it was new, with no HOA, and only eight pages of CC&Rs, with simple rules that are city-enforced, not HOA enforced, and are simple and fairly reasonable. Things like HVAC components are not to be roof-installed. One is not allowed to operate an automobile repair business at home. That sort. The only one that I am less happy with is a prohibition on non-TV antennas, but given the problems in the late seventies with the CB craze this isn't a surprise. It does mean I have to be more creative with my ham radio gear, but I have some ideas that will work. Either way, basically someone has to report a problem to the correct department at the city in order for the city to then follow up and possibly send a warning, and the only warning I'm aware of was for someone that did install HVAC on the roof, and the city allowed them to install a concealing wall to hide it from being visible instead of requiring it to be removed, so the situation is not really unreasonable.
 
2014-01-08 10:57:39 PM  
FtA: The condo in question is having to levy a $70,000 special assessment against each resident to restore the building.

Boak, who lost about $30,000 on the value of her house because of the foreclosure, said she didn't want to lose any more on a lawyer sinking ship.

She came out ahead... and maybe a bit wiser.
the buyer may soon regret his investment, 70 k per unit could easily mushroom into 120 k per unit when they discover all the mushrooms in the attics.

If you're in a HOA that can levy for any repairs... Bail out!
 
2014-01-08 10:58:42 PM  

Mugato: jst3p: SurfaceTension: HOAs have to be the most useless organizations ever. They only benefit the banks by making sure housing prices don't fall.

Doesn't that benefit also extend to the homeowner?

Well that's their sole argument for their rules, their precious property values, which they extend to mean that they'r affected by the grass being a centimeter too high or the color of your house not suiting them.

/not exaggerating, saw an old bag with a ruler coming around to everyone's lawn in my dad's neighborhood



HOAs are like a gay marriage. Don't like one don't be in one, but mine works for me.
 
2014-01-08 11:00:52 PM  

Mugato: The length of your grass affects my property values!!!


I like when defenders of HOAs show up here and pretend that if they don't submit to draconian measures that their neighbors will paint their house purple and put cars permanently up on blocks.

I belong to an HOA and they have never hasseled me over anything other than taking a while to fix my wall after a storm broke it when I was out of town. I can't imagine belonging to one where everything is controlled for property values.
 
2014-01-08 11:01:49 PM  

LemSkroob: The action path of recourse shouldn't be foreclosure. Thats like a cop pulling someone over for speeding and then shooting them in the face as soon as they walk up to the car.


I think that's standard practice in Detroit...
 
2014-01-08 11:03:12 PM  
Somebody signed an agreement without reading it? There may be consequences (no matter how shiatty)? Go figure.

"Shana, they bought their tickets. They knew what they were getting into. I say, let 'em crash."


cdn.hark.com

/ hotter than heck
// loves UCC Cases
/// reads all EULAs
//// not really
// slashies
 
2014-01-08 11:03:27 PM  

LemSkroob: The action path of recourse shouldn't be foreclosure. Thats like a cop pulling someone over for speeding and then shooting them in the face as soon as they walk up to the car.


The house is the security for the lein, which was incurred because she ignored every notice and never paid. She also must have ignored the legal notices of the foreclosure and sale. She had it in her power to put a stop to this at many points and didn't. After 6 years and scores of notices, I don't blame the HOA for getting fed up.
 
2014-01-08 11:03:51 PM  

Derwood: I live in an HOA, and it's no big deal. It just cracks me up how every HOA thread turns into mouth-frothing from a bunch of people who don't live in them



I've never lived in an HOA, and I intentionally bought remote farmland to eliminate the possibility of living in one).

When a developer moved in next door, I ignored their multiple requests, which eventually turned into legal threats, to force me to join their HOA.

And recently, the HOA land was re-surveyed in such a way that it included several acres of my property, during which time they poisoned my well and tried to have my house condemned. They did fix the deed after I took them to court, but they wrote the new deed in such a way that most of my property is now under HOA rule, complete with $250/month dues, which my lawyer says I have to continue paying until the judge orders them to remove that clause form the deed (and it's unlikely I'll get a refund).

But please, tell me how blissful my life will be now that my home has been forcibly taken over by a HOA. From my point of view, I'm getting all the usual BS and none of the benefits.
 
2014-01-08 11:04:24 PM  

bronyaur1: If you buy into a place that has a HOA, you deserve absolutely everything you get.


It's kind of hard to avoid sometimes. If you live in the SF Bay Area, and you aren't a multi-millionaire who can afford a house with land, you're going to have to buy a condo or townhouse, and that means an HOA which owns the common areas.

The good news is that, generally speaking, California is more consumer-friendly than some other states, so I would hope the law only allows the HOA to put a lien on your deed rather than sell out from under you.
 
2014-01-08 11:05:17 PM  

Gyrfalcon: FrancoFile: EffervescingElephant: FrancoFile: EffervescingElephant: Maybe one of you Farkers with a GED in law can help me with this one - my girlfriend has a similar situation, the HOA is in the process of placing a lien on her property because of some missed payments...

She is recently divorced and moved into one of her rental properties, she notified the HOA that she was moving in there, and asked them in writing to send all correspondence to the new address, that she going through a divorce and didnt want any mail going to an ex-husband.

She missed a few payments and they tacked a notice on the door with the lien notice and the attorney representing them...the back payments are only a few hundred bucks, but the attorneys want over 3,500 in fees.

They sent all correspondence/notices to her old address, even after being told not to...is there anything she can do to fight it?

Did she send that notice registered mail?  If so, then she's got a leg to stand on.

She went to the HOA office gave them a notice in person - she paid the fees for several months with checks with the right address, and once the attorneys got involved they sent everything to the right address

She could have paid the back fees...they weren't that much, she didn't know it was being turned over to attorneys, now she has almost 4 grand in fees for less than 500 bucks in back payments

She has a divorce attorney, yes?  He ought to be able to handle this.  Mgmt company screwed up and a lawyer-to-lawyer talk should get them to back down.

Would be my advice, only don't let the divorce attorney deal with it unless he/she also knows about property laws (they are different animals). It could be that getting her own attorney involved will convince the attorneys to back down--I guarantee the management company has not given them the whole story (unless they are bottom-sucking lampreys themselves). Unless your girlfriend is being a deadbeat, there's no way a $500 collection should equal $4000 in legal ...


I think I'm going to call someone tomorrow...thanks. Last month the atty fees were like 2700.00...she called today to get a payout amount and they told her it would be 3700.00 - She is not being a deadbeat. She was just trying to difer any un-needed payments during a short period of unemployment. Then a lien was nailed up on her door. The association president lives next door, and the rest of the board lives down stairs, she sees them every day. Had she known it was dire, she could have and would have borrowed the money to pay it.
 
2014-01-08 11:05:40 PM  
I like my HOA.  When banks foreclosed on houses, the HOA is the one that kept the banks from letting those go to shiat.  They were ruthless on bankowned properties that otherwise would have been disasters.  It only took a drive through non-HOA communities showed the difference.

/we also vote out the retard types that try to create stupid rules.  The HOA does a few things: make owners keep up their front yards, including bank owned houses.  Maintain the community parks.  Make sure everyone pays dues, including bank owned.  That's it.  Occasionally we get the member that wants ridiculous parking enforcement or stupidity but they are voted out.  Non-HOA areas got bank-owned properties that had no maintenance, dead or weed lawns and swamp pools.
 
2014-01-08 11:06:15 PM  

jst3p: HOAs are like a gay marriage. Don't like one don't be in one, but mine works for me.


Well I'm not in one. But I don't think my dad knew the level of meddling would be involved. And this is a guy who keeps his property immaculate and "up to code". There's just a Stepford Wives/ that neighbor next door from the Bewitched family thing that wasn't necessarily in the contract he signed. But he already has that wife of his keeping him on a leash so he's used to it.
 
2014-01-08 11:06:21 PM  

jst3p: Mugato: jst3p: SurfaceTension: HOAs have to be the most useless organizations ever. They only benefit the banks by making sure housing prices don't fall.

Doesn't that benefit also extend to the homeowner?

Well that's their sole argument for their rules, their precious property values, which they extend to mean that they'r affected by the grass being a centimeter too high or the color of your house not suiting them.

/not exaggerating, saw an old bag with a ruler coming around to everyone's lawn in my dad's neighborhood


HOAs are like a gay marriage. Don't like one don't be in one, but mine works for me.


No choice around here. Every development in the last 30 years has an HOA.

And yes, I live in one.
 
Ant
2014-01-08 11:08:42 PM  

toadist: "For six years, Ingrid Boak, who travels a lot for work as a racehorse trainer, ignored mail from her homeowner association. "

Wow, she isn't just a dumbass.    She is a super dumbass.


It still doesn't warrant having her home taken.
 
2014-01-08 11:09:03 PM  

TOSViolation: If your neighbors can give you a compelling, logical reason for why you shouldn't do something on your property, the appropriate response is not, "To[sic] bad."


That's the problem... there is no "compelling, logical reason" unless that reason involves the potential destruction of other peoples' property. "Don't set your house on fire because the one next door might burn down" is a good example. "Don't let your grass get dry in a farking drought because we don't like the way it looks" is not.  If you're not paying my mortgage, and you're not a city, town state or federal official that I have given permission and power to over such matters, you can just jump up your own ass and suffocate.

I work hard for my money.
That money is used to pay my mortgage.
"My neighbors" are in no way involved with that transaction.
Therefore, they have no say in what I do with what I bought.
That is all.
 
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