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(NPR)   Finally, we have an apple that will never brown, thanks to a genetically modified strain courtesy of a Canadian company   (npr.org) divider line 160
    More: Hero, companies of Canada, GMO, Canadians, United States Department of Agriculture, courtesy, Fuji, genetic engineering, Granny Smith  
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5000 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jan 2014 at 10:28 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-09 02:02:37 AM
Soooo......if a Canadian company genetically modofies food, they get the hero tag?
 
2014-01-09 02:10:56 AM

Poowaddins: Even Honeycrisps aren't what they were just a few years ago. When they first came out, they scented my entire house, from just a dozen in a bowl on my kitchen counter. You couldn't help but eat one, every time you walked by. They were on the smaller side, but they were crispy, and juicy, and flavorful.

Now, they're double the size that they used to be, are often mealy textured, and don't taste any different than a Braeburn/Gala, for double the price.

/sigh


I agree, they were much better several years ago. Although from your post I can't tell if you're trying to pin the decline on GMO tinkering, or just making a statement. I assumed the lackluster flavour was due to a flood of poorly produced apples from farmers trying to get into the crazy market that honeycrisps made (they were like 2-3 times more expensive than any other apples when they were first on the scene).

The actual cultivation of food has a ton to do with flavour, but people always try to pass that off to GMOs/pesticides/etc. I've had terrible organic produce before, mostly because it came the other side of the continent. Not nearly as good as the conventionally farmed stuff I can get locally.
 
2014-01-09 02:33:24 AM
Okay but how much will it cost to have the helper monkey put the pieces in your mouth for you because you're such a lazy fark you can't even cut up your own apple.
 
2014-01-09 02:36:09 AM
How about generically modifying an apple to actually taste like a farking apple?
 
2014-01-09 02:36:17 AM

some_beer_drinker: here is a short list of things Canadians invented or improved. your welcome.



So basically nothing important.
 
2014-01-09 02:42:11 AM

NDP2: Canton: cptjeff: Canton: Too bad the modified apple had to be a Granny Smith of all things...

I don't mind Granny Smith. Certainly a better choice than a Red "Delicious". Mealy textured and flavorless- about the only thing those are good for is when they're used to imitate other fruit in instant oatmeal.

\Yes, ladies and gentlemen, peaches those ain't.

Eh. Depends on where they're grown. I've had some decent ones locally, but then, Michigan has much smaller, sweeter apples than the flavorless things they ship in from Washington. For all I know they're two different strains. They sure don't look like the same apple.

Granny Smith is okay, but too mild. I like more flavor. Sweet, tart, whatever. As long as it's fresh, crisp and local, it's probably a good bet. Ginger Gold in season, for example, is heaven in apple form. I'm sure of it.

/Picky about my apples

Have you tried a  Northern Spy?  It's not considered an "eating" apple but I like it's sweet-tart blend.  Unfortunately, they're extremely tough to find.  Where I live (Eastern Washington) you never find them in supermarkets and I've only been able to get them at a couple local orchards that specialize in unique and hard-to-find apples.

Another sweet-tart apple I like is the Winesap.  It used to be quite common in stores but now it's as tough to find as Northern Spies.


Oh yeah. They're reasonably easy to find here in Michigan, I think. I find them too soft for eating. My dad tends to bake with them, and make them into sauce. They're great that way.

McIntosh apples are delicious for eating if you want a good little apple that's on the tart side, though! I've never tried a Winesap, alas. If I ever find them in the autumn, though...
 
2014-01-09 03:13:03 AM

Old enough to know better: How about generically modifying an apple to actually taste like a farking apple?


Hey now, lets keep this discussion in the realm of real possibilities and not take it to a science fiction level where fruit is suppose to taste like fruit
 
2014-01-09 03:14:04 AM

doglover: The Southern Dandy: Won't go brown, but will still rot.  I'd rather have an apple that browned so I could know it was rotten.

Brown has nothing to do with rot. Some Apples brown in seconds in oxygenated air. Still good hours laters.


Sure, but if you see an apple that still green and it's actually rotten, and then take a bite.  Yuck!  Whereas, if it were brown...even though it still might be good, you'd sniff it first before you took a bite, because the visual cue of browness would tell you it ain't brand new.  A visual cue of not brown says "brand new", even though it ain't.
 
2014-01-09 03:36:55 AM
This is not an improvement.
 
2014-01-09 03:47:49 AM

shanrick: The cost savings "can be huge," he says. "Right now, to make fresh-cut apple slices and put them in the bag, 35 or 40 percent of the cost is the antioxident treatment. So you could make a fresh-cut apple slice 30 percent cheaper."

So why will they cost four times as much?


They probably won't.  GMO agricultural products are typically significantly cheaper than trying to grow the same products in the obsolete and/or most retarded way mathematically possible, because intentionally doing retarded farking bullshiat like foregoing fertilizer and so on is mostly a retard thing to do by virtue of severe failure of cost-effectiveness.

Probably they'll wind up like modified tomatoes or corn, something on the order of 20% cheaper typically.
 
2014-01-09 05:01:48 AM
OMG GMOs
 
2014-01-09 05:13:21 AM
Gross. No thank you.
 
2014-01-09 05:14:48 AM

fustanella: OMG GMOs


ZOMG GMOZ?
 
2014-01-09 05:32:56 AM

meat0918: sheep snorter: Executives: We can make shiatloads of money on this non-browning apple!!
People: fark you and all your greed by ruining the 'natural' food chain.
Executives: A small militia of private police(provided by blackwater corps) are on the way to your home, citizen. Please lie down and take it up the ass, as we own your food.

/Zero need for this product.
//Those who need it buy Apple products and don't know jackshiat about life, the universe and everything.

It's not made for us, it's made for the guys that produce already cut apples so they don't have to treat it with chemicals

And here's the kicker, you don't really need to worry about cross pollination with this one, since all or almost all orchards are all clones of a specific variety already anyways.

Even your organic ones are clones.

That, and the typical GMO complaints don't apply.

It's all apple genes.

It's not Monsanto.

It'll be ready labeled as "Arctic" apples.


Although the existing varieties of apples are all clones (made by grafting scion wood), it doesn't mean that future ones will be.  Remember, the most popular apple varieties today, were all created by cross pollination in the last 50 years.  I have a new Russett on my farm that is the result of accidental pollination and it is one of the best apples we have.  You seem to be operating under the belief that there will be no new apple varieties that people will want, and that there are not people right now working on cross pollinating to get new and unusual apples.  I can tell you, that's not at all true.
 
2014-01-09 05:46:30 AM

The Southern Dandy: Whereas, if it were brown...even though it still might be good, you'd sniff it first before you took a bite, because the visual cue of browness would tell you it ain't brand new.  A visual cue of not brown says "brand new", even though it ain't.


That's a silly argument, as the target market of this apple is a replacement for chemically-treated sliced apples that are already prevented from browning, so there'd be no change in the conditions of browning seen by consumers.

Beyond that, if you can't smell (and/or see and/or feel) that an apple slice is rotten before you get it in your mouth -- regardless of the color -- it's either not very rotten or you're not paying attention.
 
2014-01-09 06:05:39 AM

some_beer_drinker: here is a short list of things Canadians invented or improved. your welcome.


Insulin, Treatment for Diabetes [1921, Frederick Banting, Charles Best]
Telephone [1876, Alexander Graham Bell]
Light Bulb [1874, Henry Woodward, Mathew Evans]
Five Pin Bowling [1908, Thomas F. Ryan]
Wonderbra [1964, Louise Poirier]
Pacemaker [1950, John Hopps, Wilfred Bigelow, John Callaghan]
Robertson Screw, 1908 [Peter Robertson]
Zipper [1913, Gideon Sundback]
Electric Wheelchair [1952, George Klein]
Poutine [1957, Fernand Lachance]
Cobalt-60 "Bomb" Cancer Treatment [1951, Harold Johns]
Java Programming Language [1994, James Arthur Gosling]
Bloody Caesar [1969, Walter Chell]
Canadarm [1975, Spar Aerospace/NRC]
Standard time [1878, Sir Sandford Fleming]
Electron Microscope [1939, James Hillier, Albert Prebus]
Ski-Doo [1922, Armand Bombardier]
BlackBerry [1999, Mike Lazaridis]
Radio Voice Transmission [1900, Reginald Fessenden]
Birchbark Canoe [First Peoples]
Basketball [1892, James Naismith]
Retractable Beer Carton Handle [1957, Steve Pasjack]
UV Degradable Plastics [1971, James Guillet]
Instant Replay [1955, CBC's Hockey Night in Canada]
Goalie Mask [1959, Jacques Plante]
Marquis Wheat [1908, Sir Charles Saunders]
Pablum [1930, Alan Brown, Theodore Drake, Frederick Tisdall]
Lacrosse [First Peoples]
Electric Oven [1892, Thomas Ahearn]
Steam Fog Horn [1853, Robert Foulis]
Walkie-Talkie [1942, Donald L. Hings]
Alkaline Long-Lasting Battery [1959, Lewis Urry]
Paint roller [1940, Norman Breakey]
Electronic Music Synthesizer [1945, Hugh Le Caine]
WeeVac 6 [1990, Wendy Murphy]
Green Garbage Bag [1950, Harry Wasylyk, Larry Hansen, Frank Plomp]
Snowblower [1925, Arthur Sicard]
Self-propelled Combine Harvester [1937, Thomas Carroll]
Instant Mashed Potatoes [1962, Edward Asselbergs]
Explosives Vapour Detector [1985, Lorne Elias]
Marine Screw Propeller [1833, John Patch]
Plexiglas [1931, William Chalmers]
Key Frame Animation [1969, Nestor Burtnyk, Marcelli Wein]
CPR Mannequin: "ACTAR 911" [1989, Dianne Croteau, Richard Brault]
G-Suit [1941, Wilbur Rounding Franks]
Ardox Spiral Nail [1954, Allan Dove]
Automatic Lubricating Cup [1872, Elijah McCoy]
Crash-Position Indicator-CPI [1957, Harry Stevinson]
Caulking Gun [1894, Theodore Witte]
Separable Baggage Check [1882, John Mitchell Lyons


But the Cleveland Steamer could never be in that list no matter about Lake Erie.
 
2014-01-09 07:23:34 AM
People who buy precut apples deserve everything they get.
 
2014-01-09 08:12:15 AM
Because God forbid you have to eat a non-sliced apple.  A whole apple with your teeth, tearing into it like a caveman.
 
2014-01-09 08:14:10 AM

blipponaut: Are people such wimps that they won't eat an apple that has browned slightly after being cut?


I'd say this is partly due to the demand for fresh fruit and vegetables in small portions that they sell at convenience stores and college campuses. Since they typically use clear plastic packaging, the brown apples would not draw customers.
 
2014-01-09 08:15:34 AM

jakomo002: Because God forbid you have to eat a non-sliced apple.  A whole apple with your teeth, tearing into it like a caveman.



Sometimes sliced apples are kind of cute:
www.zoompuzzles.com
 
2014-01-09 08:17:53 AM

Mister Peejay: The Southern Dandy: Won't go brown, but will still rot.  I'd rather have an apple that browned so I could know it was rotten.



/not sure if bad.jpg


*shakes tiny fist*
 
2014-01-09 08:54:20 AM
Did you know the Courtland apple is  one of the apples that are most resistant to browning ?
 
2014-01-09 08:57:08 AM
fusillade762 [TotalFark]
2014-01-08 07:55:11 PM


How hard is it to buy a whole apple and cut it yourself? Damn, people are lazy.

www.seriouseats.com
At 3x the price.

i.walmartimages.com
At 5x the price*
*Though some bags come with free animal parts.
 
2014-01-09 08:59:02 AM

AcneVulgaris: You know what?  Just buy a farking apple for farksakes, and bite chunks off with your farking teeth.

I have seen the future, and it is pussified.


The future is now fyi
 
2014-01-09 09:01:28 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: GoldSpider: Genetic engineering is scary because I don't understand it. Therefore these apples should be banned.

Pretty much sums up the anti-GMO argument

/and in this case, it's just reiterations of its own genes


Sounds oddly similar to the pro GMO argument.

GMO is good because science. As a random office worker I am science expert so I decide I want to make you eat this stuff for your own good.
 
2014-01-09 09:21:59 AM
Yet when extra copies of the gene are added, the apple reacts by shutting down all of them, stopping production of the enzyme and preventing the browning reaction.

Ah, the President Madagascar gene...
 
2014-01-09 09:23:06 AM

ciberido: fusillade762: How hard is it to buy a whole apple and cut it yourself? Damn, people are lazy.

For someone with no health issues, I tend to agree with you, but there are people with physical conditions such as arthritis who find pre-cut fruits and vegetables extremely convenient.


You, stop talking!  Everyone's situation is exactly like mine.  Therefore, everyone who doesn't make the same choices as me is wrong!
 
2014-01-09 09:46:50 AM

ReapTheChaos: Apples will keep for months in the fridge and you shouldn't be slicing them until you're about to eat them anyway so I honestly don't see a point to this.


Preparing school/daycare lunches, I suppose. I cut up a honeycrisp for the kid this morning (she's 2, wouldn't know what to do with a whole apple). It'd be nice to be able to do the prep work the night before, since some mornings are a bit of a rush.

/I mean, it took all of a minute to slice up the apple
//White people problems
 
2014-01-09 09:59:51 AM

nocturnal001: MaudlinMutantMollusk: GoldSpider: Genetic engineering is scary because I don't understand it. Therefore these apples should be banned.

Pretty much sums up the anti-GMO argument

/and in this case, it's just reiterations of its own genes

Sounds oddly similar to the pro GMO argument.

GMO is good because science. As a random office worker I am science expert so I decide I want to make you eat this stuff for your own good.


I guess pointing out you don't have to eat it is a bit obvious, huh?
 
2014-01-09 10:34:46 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: nocturnal001: MaudlinMutantMollusk: GoldSpider: Genetic engineering is scary because I don't understand it. Therefore these apples should be banned.

Pretty much sums up the anti-GMO argument

/and in this case, it's just reiterations of its own genes

Sounds oddly similar to the pro GMO argument.

GMO is good because science. As a random office worker I am science expert so I decide I want to make you eat this stuff for your own good.

I guess pointing out you don't have to eat it is a bit obvious, huh?



If only there were was some sort of labeling process to allow people to avoid GMO foods if they wanted to do so.

This particular one though, seems like a win/win. Personally I like a little bit of lemon juice on my sliced apples, but if this makes it easier/cheaper to get people to eat fresh fruit from such a minor manipulation of the apple then I don't know who would oppose it.
 
2014-01-09 10:47:28 AM

nocturnal001: MaudlinMutantMollusk: nocturnal001: MaudlinMutantMollusk: GoldSpider: Genetic engineering is scary because I don't understand it. Therefore these apples should be banned.

Pretty much sums up the anti-GMO argument

/and in this case, it's just reiterations of its own genes

Sounds oddly similar to the pro GMO argument.

GMO is good because science. As a random office worker I am science expert so I decide I want to make you eat this stuff for your own good.

I guess pointing out you don't have to eat it is a bit obvious, huh?


If only there were was some sort of labeling process to allow people to avoid GMO foods if they wanted to do so.

This particular one though, seems like a win/win. Personally I like a little bit of lemon juice on my sliced apples, but if this makes it easier/cheaper to get people to eat fresh fruit from such a minor manipulation of the apple then I don't know who would oppose it.


Lots of people obviously have concerns. The question is whether or not those concerns are justified.

/To me, it just seems like much ado about nothing
//but who the f*ck am I?
 
2014-01-09 10:52:56 AM

ltr77: meat0918: sheep snorter: Executives: We can make shiatloads of money on this non-browning apple!!
People: fark you and all your greed by ruining the 'natural' food chain.
Executives: A small militia of private police(provided by blackwater corps) are on the way to your home, citizen. Please lie down and take it up the ass, as we own your food.

/Zero need for this product.
//Those who need it buy Apple products and don't know jackshiat about life, the universe and everything.

It's not made for us, it's made for the guys that produce already cut apples so they don't have to treat it with chemicals

And here's the kicker, you don't really need to worry about cross pollination with this one, since all or almost all orchards are all clones of a specific variety already anyways.

Even your organic ones are clones.

That, and the typical GMO complaints don't apply.

It's all apple genes.

It's not Monsanto.

It'll be ready labeled as "Arctic" apples.

Although the existing varieties of apples are all clones (made by grafting scion wood), it doesn't mean that future ones will be.  Remember, the most popular apple varieties today, were all created by cross pollination in the last 50 years.  I have a new Russett on my farm that is the result of accidental pollination and it is one of the best apples we have.  You seem to be operating under the belief that there will be no new apple varieties that people will want, and that there are not people right now working on cross pollinating to get new and unusual apples.  I can tell you, that's not at all true.


If I said I love Cornell and their apple programs, would that disabuse you of that notion?
 
2014-01-09 10:53:15 AM
Pre-sliced not browning apples will go nicely in my shopping cart beside my pre-wrapped with tinfoil baked potatoes.

Just need to find a way for someone/thing to chew all my food for me and place it in my stomach.

Eating is so much work....
 
2014-01-09 11:03:33 AM

gadian: But does it still taste like an apple? A real apple?



Tastes like Maple syrup.
 
2014-01-09 11:07:32 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: nocturnal001: MaudlinMutantMollusk: nocturnal001: MaudlinMutantMollusk: GoldSpider: Genetic engineering is scary because I don't understand it. Therefore these apples should be banned.

Pretty much sums up the anti-GMO argument

/and in this case, it's just reiterations of its own genes

Sounds oddly similar to the pro GMO argument.

GMO is good because science. As a random office worker I am science expert so I decide I want to make you eat this stuff for your own good.

I guess pointing out you don't have to eat it is a bit obvious, huh?


If only there were was some sort of labeling process to allow people to avoid GMO foods if they wanted to do so.

This particular one though, seems like a win/win. Personally I like a little bit of lemon juice on my sliced apples, but if this makes it easier/cheaper to get people to eat fresh fruit from such a minor manipulation of the apple then I don't know who would oppose it.

Lots of people obviously have concerns. The question is whether or not those concerns are justified.

/To me, it just seems like much ado about nothing
//but who the f*ck am I?


Personally I'm very cautious about swapping genes across different animals. It's about risk vs reward. My reward for eating that new kind of corn that kills insects on it's own is likely to be a minor increase in food costs, but the potential downside could be severe. I'm no scientologist, but I do know that a 5 year FDA study that says "yeah this is safe to eat" doesn't mean "yes, this is 100% safe" but rather "yeah, we didn't see anything bad happen so you are probably good to go".
 
2014-01-09 11:12:05 AM

JohnNS: Pre-sliced not browning apples will go nicely in my shopping cart beside my pre-wrapped with tinfoil baked potatoes.

Just need to find a way for someone/thing to chew all my food for me and place it in my stomach.

Eating is so much work....


I have a feeling this is geared towards students who do not have enough time to slice their apples while trying to make their 10-minute walk from the dorm in less than 5 mibutes. Walking and cutting can be dangerous.

If you don't need it, don't buy it.
 
2014-01-09 11:14:52 AM

some_beer_drinker: here is a short list of things Canadians invented or improved. your welcome.


Insulin, Treatment for Diabetes [1921, Frederick Banting, Charles Best]
Telephone [1876, Alexander Graham Bell]
Light Bulb [1874, Henry Woodward, Mathew Evans]
Five Pin Bowling [1908, Thomas F. Ryan]
Wonderbra [1964, Louise Poirier]
Pacemaker [1950, John Hopps, Wilfred Bigelow, John Callaghan]
Robertson Screw, 1908 [Peter Robertson]
Zipper [1913, Gideon Sundback]
Electric Wheelchair [1952, George Klein]
Poutine [1957, Fernand Lachance]
Cobalt-60 "Bomb" Cancer Treatment [1951, Harold Johns]
Java Programming Language [1994, James Arthur Gosling]
Bloody Caesar [1969, Walter Chell]
Canadarm [1975, Spar Aerospace/NRC]
Standard time [1878, Sir Sandford Fleming]
Electron Microscope [1939, James Hillier, Albert Prebus]
Ski-Doo [1922, Armand Bombardier]
BlackBerry [1999, Mike Lazaridis]
Radio Voice Transmission [1900, Reginald Fessenden]
Birchbark Canoe [First Peoples]
Basketball [1892, James Naismith]
Retractable Beer Carton Handle [1957, Steve Pasjack]
UV Degradable Plastics [1971, James Guillet]
Instant Replay [1955, CBC's Hockey Night in Canada]
Goalie Mask [1959, Jacques Plante]
Marquis Wheat [1908, Sir Charles Saunders]
Pablum [1930, Alan Brown, Theodore Drake, Frederick Tisdall]
Lacrosse [First Peoples]
Electric Oven [1892, Thomas Ahearn]
Steam Fog Horn [1853, Robert Foulis]
Walkie-Talkie [1942, Donald L. Hings]
Alkaline Long-Lasting Battery [1959, Lewis Urry]
Paint roller [1940, Norman Breakey]
Electronic Music Synthesizer [1945, Hugh Le Caine]
WeeVac 6 [1990, Wendy Murphy]
Green Garbage Bag [1950, Harry Wasylyk, Larry Hansen, Frank Plomp]
Snowblower [1925, Arthur Sicard]
Self-propelled Combine Harvester [1937, Thomas Carroll]
Instant Mashed Potatoes [1962, Edward Asselbergs]
Explosives Vapour Detector [1985, Lorne Elias]
Marine Screw Propeller [1833, John Patch]
Plexiglas [1931, William Chalmers]
Key Frame Animation [1969, Nestor Burtnyk, Marcelli Wein]
CPR Mannequin: "ACTAR 911" [1989, ...



LOL!  When I first read that I thought....Why would the Canadian Pacific Railroad need a mannequin?
 
2014-01-09 11:58:57 AM

fusillade762: How hard is it to buy a whole apple and cut it yourself? Damn, people are lazy.


Because many places have zero tolerance rules regarding knives.  You could be fired, expelled or arrested for doing so.
 
2014-01-09 12:01:46 PM

nocturnal001: Personally I'm very cautious about swapping genes across different animals. It's about risk vs reward. My reward for eating that new kind of corn that kills insects on it's own is likely to be a minor increase in food costs, but the potential downside could be severe. I'm no scientologist, but I do know that a 5 year FDA study that says "yeah this is safe to eat" doesn't mean "yes, this is 100% safe" but rather "yeah, we didn't see anything bad happen so you are probably good to go".


As mentioned up thread, this one is all apple genes.
 
2014-01-09 12:49:49 PM
Just a note: if you can get them... the Ambrosia apple from BC is probably the greatest apple ever...
 
2014-01-09 01:13:36 PM

imfallen_angel: Just a note: if you can get them... the Ambrosia apple from BC is probably the greatest apple ever...



I prefer my apples to be a little more recent.
 
2014-01-09 01:19:46 PM

meat0918: ltr77: meat0918: sheep snorter: Executives: We can make shiatloads of money on this non-browning apple!!
People: fark you and all your greed by ruining the 'natural' food chain.
Executives: A small militia of private police(provided by blackwater corps) are on the way to your home, citizen. Please lie down and take it up the ass, as we own your food.

/Zero need for this product.
//Those who need it buy Apple products and don't know jackshiat about life, the universe and everything.

It's not made for us, it's made for the guys that produce already cut apples so they don't have to treat it with chemicals

And here's the kicker, you don't really need to worry about cross pollination with this one, since all or almost all orchards are all clones of a specific variety already anyways.

Even your organic ones are clones.

That, and the typical GMO complaints don't apply.

It's all apple genes.

It's not Monsanto.

It'll be ready labeled as "Arctic" apples.

Although the existing varieties of apples are all clones (made by grafting scion wood), it doesn't mean that future ones will be.  Remember, the most popular apple varieties today, were all created by cross pollination in the last 50 years.  I have a new Russett on my farm that is the result of accidental pollination and it is one of the best apples we have.  You seem to be operating under the belief that there will be no new apple varieties that people will want, and that there are not people right now working on cross pollinating to get new and unusual apples.  I can tell you, that's not at all true.

If I said I love Cornell and their apple programs, would that disabuse you of that notion?


BOOOOOOOO. U of M ALL THE WAY.

//I'm still bitter that Cornell couldn't pay for me.
 
2014-01-09 01:21:50 PM

meat0918: nocturnal001: Personally I'm very cautious about swapping genes across different animals. It's about risk vs reward. My reward for eating that new kind of corn that kills insects on it's own is likely to be a minor increase in food costs, but the potential downside could be severe. I'm no scientologist, but I do know that a 5 year FDA study that says "yeah this is safe to eat" doesn't mean "yes, this is 100% safe" but rather "yeah, we didn't see anything bad happen so you are probably good to go".

As mentioned up thread, this one is all apple genes.


It's not even genes from different types of apples. They are just added an extra copy of the gene that is responsible for browning. "Yet when extra copies of the gene are added, the apple reacts by shutting down all of them, stopping production of the enzyme and preventing the browning reaction."

This technique was discovered several years ago by a guy trying to create a darker colored petunia. When he doubled up the color gene he ended up with white flowers. Surprise.
 
2014-01-09 01:23:50 PM

nocturnal001: MaudlinMutantMollusk: GoldSpider: Genetic engineering is scary because I don't understand it. Therefore these apples should be banned.

Pretty much sums up the anti-GMO argument

/and in this case, it's just reiterations of its own genes

Sounds oddly similar to the pro GMO argument.

GMO is good because science. As a random office worker I am science expert so I decide I want to make you eat this stuff for your own good.


You may not be a science expert, but:  http://ec.europa.eu/research/biosociety/pdf/a_decade_of_eu-funded_gmo _ research.pdf collectively are.
 
2014-01-09 01:52:52 PM

OnlyM3: fusillade762 [TotalFark]
2014-01-08 07:55:11 PM


How hard is it to buy a whole apple and cut it yourself? Damn, people are lazy.
[www.seriouseats.com image 610x459]
At 3x the price.

[i.walmartimages.com image 500x500]
At 5x the price*
*Though some bags come with free animal parts.


To be fair, cutting an apple and then cleaning the knife is a lot easier and quicker than grating cheese and cleaning the cheese grater or, as I like to call it, "sponge ruiner".

/Mitch Hedberg
 
2014-01-09 02:33:34 PM

Kinek: meat0918: ltr77: meat0918: sheep snorter: Executives: We can make shiatloads of money on this non-browning apple!!
People: fark you and all your greed by ruining the 'natural' food chain.
Executives: A small militia of private police(provided by blackwater corps) are on the way to your home, citizen. Please lie down and take it up the ass, as we own your food.

/Zero need for this product.
//Those who need it buy Apple products and don't know jackshiat about life, the universe and everything.

It's not made for us, it's made for the guys that produce already cut apples so they don't have to treat it with chemicals

And here's the kicker, you don't really need to worry about cross pollination with this one, since all or almost all orchards are all clones of a specific variety already anyways.

Even your organic ones are clones.

That, and the typical GMO complaints don't apply.

It's all apple genes.

It's not Monsanto.

It'll be ready labeled as "Arctic" apples.

Although the existing varieties of apples are all clones (made by grafting scion wood), it doesn't mean that future ones will be.  Remember, the most popular apple varieties today, were all created by cross pollination in the last 50 years.  I have a new Russett on my farm that is the result of accidental pollination and it is one of the best apples we have.  You seem to be operating under the belief that there will be no new apple varieties that people will want, and that there are not people right now working on cross pollinating to get new and unusual apples.  I can tell you, that's not at all true.

If I said I love Cornell and their apple programs, would that disabuse you of that notion?

BOOOOOOOO. U of M ALL THE WAY.

//I'm still bitter that Cornell couldn't pay for me.


My wife tried grafting a Liberty and Freedom (both Cornell bred)  apples to what was supposed to be apple rootstock, mostly for the lulz.

Didn't work unfortunately..  Gonna try again soon though..
 
2014-01-09 04:37:19 PM

meat0918: ltr77: meat0918: sheep snorter: Executives: We can make shiatloads of money on this non-browning apple!!
People: fark you and all your greed by ruining the 'natural' food chain.
Executives: A small militia of private police(provided by blackwater corps) are on the way to your home, citizen. Please lie down and take it up the ass, as we own your food.

/Zero need for this product.
//Those who need it buy Apple products and don't know jackshiat about life, the universe and everything.

It's not made for us, it's made for the guys that produce already cut apples so they don't have to treat it with chemicals

And here's the kicker, you don't really need to worry about cross pollination with this one, since all or almost all orchards are all clones of a specific variety already anyways.

Even your organic ones are clones.

That, and the typical GMO complaints don't apply.

It's all apple genes.

It's not Monsanto.

It'll be ready labeled as "Arctic" apples.

Although the existing varieties of apples are all clones (made by grafting scion wood), it doesn't mean that future ones will be.  Remember, the most popular apple varieties today, were all created by cross pollination in the last 50 years.  I have a new Russett on my farm that is the result of accidental pollination and it is one of the best apples we have.  You seem to be operating under the belief that there will be no new apple varieties that people will want, and that there are not people right now working on cross pollinating to get new and unusual apples.  I can tell you, that's not at all true.

If I said I love Cornell and their apple programs, would that disabuse you of that notion?


Not if your contention is that we don't have to worry about cross-pollination from a GMO apple.
 
2014-01-09 04:45:13 PM

ltr77: meat0918: ltr77: meat0918: sheep snorter: Executives: We can make shiatloads of money on this non-browning apple!!
People: fark you and all your greed by ruining the 'natural' food chain.
Executives: A small militia of private police(provided by blackwater corps) are on the way to your home, citizen. Please lie down and take it up the ass, as we own your food.

/Zero need for this product.
//Those who need it buy Apple products and don't know jackshiat about life, the universe and everything.

It's not made for us, it's made for the guys that produce already cut apples so they don't have to treat it with chemicals

And here's the kicker, you don't really need to worry about cross pollination with this one, since all or almost all orchards are all clones of a specific variety already anyways.

Even your organic ones are clones.

That, and the typical GMO complaints don't apply.

It's all apple genes.

It's not Monsanto.

It'll be ready labeled as "Arctic" apples.

Although the existing varieties of apples are all clones (made by grafting scion wood), it doesn't mean that future ones will be.  Remember, the most popular apple varieties today, were all created by cross pollination in the last 50 years.  I have a new Russett on my farm that is the result of accidental pollination and it is one of the best apples we have.  You seem to be operating under the belief that there will be no new apple varieties that people will want, and that there are not people right now working on cross pollinating to get new and unusual apples.  I can tell you, that's not at all true.

If I said I love Cornell and their apple programs, would that disabuse you of that notion?

Not if your contention is that we don't have to worry about cross-pollination from a GMO apple.


My contention is the worry is far less than with corn.
 
2014-01-09 05:17:36 PM
i suspect Applejack does not approve./how the buck am I the first with this?//you may now return to an actual discussion
 
2014-01-09 05:23:40 PM

some_beer_drinker: here is a short list of things Canadians invented or improved. your welcome.

Electronic Music Synthesizer [1945, Hugh Le Caine]


No. The Hammond Novachord was first produced in 1939 and invented by John M. Hanert, Laurens Hammond and C. N. Williams in the USA.

/Canadian synth player
 
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