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(Des Moines Register)   Today's Crisis in the Midwest: The Iowa State Fair will eliminate cash sales at food vendors and make everyone use a prepaid ticket system. "Similar to theft but with funnel cakes"   (desmoinesregister.com) divider line 107
    More: Scary, Iowa State Fair, state fair, funnel cakes, food vendors, Lyle Kreps, West Des Moines  
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5503 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jan 2014 at 1:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



107 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-08 01:11:37 PM  
Funnel cakes = crack with powdered sugar.

[shutupandtakemymoney.jpg]
 
2014-01-08 01:35:43 PM  
How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.
 
2014-01-08 01:38:02 PM  

Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.


Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.
 
2014-01-08 01:38:43 PM  
I assume this will work like Dave and buster's where the tickets suddenly don't seem tied to money
 
2014-01-08 01:39:06 PM  
Scary tag?  Really stubby??  Go back in your hole.
 
2014-01-08 01:40:11 PM  

FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.


I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?
 
2014-01-08 01:41:08 PM  
Because the min. wage food vendor/methheads steal cash.
That's why.
 
2014-01-08 01:41:32 PM  
THANKS, OBAMA!
 
2014-01-08 01:41:50 PM  

FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.


www.ticketloot.com


I've got some coupins!
 
2014-01-08 01:42:27 PM  
Screw this, I attend the florida strawberry festival just because I can spend all the money I want. If they went to a ticket system I wouldn't even go, I usually go just for the food and beer.

/Try 13 different deep fried bacon's, at $2.50 a piece I will attempt to try all of them before I have a heart attack and die happy
 
2014-01-08 01:43:41 PM  
Let them eat funnel cake.

/rides away sans clothing
 
2014-01-08 01:43:41 PM  

pute kisses like a man: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.

I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


It's sort of the same as gift cards. They will sell so many, but somewhat fewer will be cashed in for the reward and not all will be used for the maximum value, leaving the company with an incrementally larger profit.
 
2014-01-08 01:44:00 PM  

pute kisses like a man: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.

I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


Better.  People leave with unused tickets.  And by setting a ticket at $2 you mask the actual price so there isn't as much sticker shock.
 
2014-01-08 01:44:38 PM  
That's what the Texas State Fair has always done. No big deal.
 
2014-01-08 01:44:42 PM  
Cash may have its flaws (one being, you lose it, it's gone), but it still provides a very simple system: 1.) Want food 2.)Give cash.

Or credit, or ticket if that's your thing. Having options is good.
 
2014-01-08 01:44:46 PM  

pute kisses like a man: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.

I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


Lots of festivals get a cut of the sales or a flat rate (which ever ends up being more) so vendors will under report sales to pay a smaller cut.

With tickets, vendors have to turn them in to get their money at the end of the day.
 
2014-01-08 01:44:48 PM  

pute kisses like a man: I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


Once you buy the tickets they have your money and it's guaranteed revenue whether you actually use the tickets or not. Unless it causes people to forgo purchasing food because they don't have a ticket, the worst they can do is the same and for every ticket that goes reimbursed it's free money.
 
2014-01-08 01:45:11 PM  

pute kisses like a man: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.

I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


My guess, the 'business reason' is so that the fair can ensure that the food vendors aren't skimming off the top and misreporting their revenue.    If the vendors have to redeem their tickets with the fair for cash (because the fair is trading the tickets for cash on the front-end), the fair knows exactly how much it gets to keep as 'rent'.
 
2014-01-08 01:45:21 PM  

pute kisses like a man: I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


I hate "cash --> tickets --> product" exchange system. It's a pain in the ass, but I'm guessing it's for the same reason that stores love selling prepaid gift cards: there's gonna be a percentage of them that never get redeemed, which means extra profit.
 
2014-01-08 01:46:46 PM  
"Similar to theft but with funnel cakes"

Mmmm. Sweet sweet theft.
 
2014-01-08 01:47:48 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: "Similar to theft but with funnel cakes"

Mmmm. Sweet sweet theft.


you sound like a politician.  :-/
 
2014-01-08 01:48:05 PM  

gretzkyscores: pute kisses like a man: I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?

I hate "cash --> tickets --> product" exchange system. It's a pain in the ass, but I'm guessing it's for the same reason that stores love selling prepaid gift cards: there's gonna be a percentage of them that never get redeemed, which means extra profit.


Stores keep the breakage. Watched a lady say "yeah, just toss it" when the clerk informed her that the balance on the gift card was $ .47
 
2014-01-08 01:48:26 PM  

Pinner: Because the min. wage food vendor/methheads steal cash.
That's why.


Probably. The Texas state fair has done this for years (tickets instead of cash).

Unless you're the kind of person who spends uncontrollable at the fair, it's an annoyance, not a civil rights issue.
 
2014-01-08 01:48:32 PM  
There are a large number of benefits to switching to a ticket system, none of which benefit the customer.
 
2014-01-08 01:48:56 PM  

FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.


The last Oktoberfest I went to did this, and I hated it.  Was walking around and saw some vendors with food and no line, but didn't have tickets on me, so I didn't get any.  Later, wanted a beer, while I'm standing right next to a beer vendor, but I can't get one because I don't have a ticket.  So, I find a ticket booth, but they have no listing of what food costs at them, so I have no idea how many I need... get $10 worth, and get a brat and pretzel, but find I don't have enough for a beer to.  Get $1 in tickets for a beer so I can get my beer, but now my brat is cold.

At this point I'm a bit soured, and don't feel like waiting in the ticket line again, so I don't buy anything else.  If I could have paid cash, I'd probably have bought twice as much, but I have no desire to guess ahead of time how hungry/thirsty I'm going to be and get tickets, and find I'm either short, or way over and stuck with non-refundable tickets.

Now... if a fair uses tickets for food, I just don't go.
 
2014-01-08 01:49:27 PM  
Oh boy, I can stand in line to trade real money for fake money that can only be spent in one place.  If your minimum wage employees steal from you, fire them.  If your minimum wage employees can't count, educate them.  If education fails, fire them.

Here's how I see it working:

1. You buy too many tickets because who knows how many you'll need.
2. The tickets are worth $.50, which means everything will be rounded UP I'm sure.
3. You'll lose some of them because they're small, light, and not conveniently shaped.
4. At the end of the night, they say "You can save them for next year." You won't find or remember them.

So, extra money for the fair because they sold the tickets.  A little extra money for the vendors because they go to round all their prices up to the nearest $.50.  A little less theft by the employees (now they'll only steal enough to feed themselves and their kinfolk).  Doesn't seem worth it...

vertecology.com
 
2014-01-08 01:50:55 PM  
Take my cash or I'll shoot.
 
2014-01-08 01:51:52 PM  

grinding_journalist: There are a large number of benefits to switching to a ticket system, none of which benefit the customer vendors who want to underreport sales where the fee is sales-based.


Jus' saying...
 
2014-01-08 01:53:13 PM  
was re-looking at the article and found this gem:   "None of us like change, but once people experience it and see the convenience, they'll buy into it,"

now help me understand the convenience of standing in line A to purchase tickets, then standing in line B to acquire food....wouldn't it be more convenient to standing in 1 line and simply purchase the food?

Adding additional steps is not "convenience".
 
2014-01-08 01:53:16 PM  

morgen_benner: Oh boy, I can stand in line to trade real money for fake money that can only be spent in one place.  If your minimum wage employees steal from you, fire them.  If your minimum wage employees can't count, educate them.  If education fails, fire them.

Here's how I see it working:

1. You buy too many tickets because who knows how many you'll need.
2. The tickets are worth $.50, which means everything will be rounded UP I'm sure.
3. You'll lose some of them because they're small, light, and not conveniently shaped.
4. At the end of the night, they say "You can save them for next year." You won't find or remember them.

So, extra money for the fair because they sold the tickets.  A little extra money for the vendors because they go to round all their prices up to the nearest $.50.  A little less theft by the employees (now they'll only steal enough to feed themselves and their kinfolk).  Doesn't seem worth it...

[vertecology.com image 660x281]


Fiat currency!
Audit the Iowa State Fair!
RON PAUL!
 
2014-01-08 01:53:27 PM  

WhyKnot: My guess, the 'business reason' is so that the fair can ensure that the food vendors aren't skimming off the top and misreporting their revenue.    If the vendors have to redeem their tickets with the fair for cash (because the fair is trading the tickets for cash on the front-end), the fair knows exactly how much it gets to keep as 'rent'.


Oh no, someone took part of their 17.5% they took off the top as rent? How will they ever make ends meet?  If it's that big a problem, charge a flat rate that isn't ridiculous. Or, a hybrid where you pay a fixed fee and a lower percentage to offset some of the sandbagging.
 
2014-01-08 01:54:00 PM  

pute kisses like a man: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.

I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


Sales are faster. And it's easier for vendors to not have to handle cash.
 
2014-01-08 01:54:14 PM  
I'm rich!
cdn.displays2go.com
 
2014-01-08 01:55:07 PM  
tagn.files.wordpress.com

It's money that's made just for the park.  It works just like regular money, but it's, er..."fun".
 
2014-01-08 01:56:16 PM  

FrancoFile: Fiat currency!
Audit the Iowa State Fair!
RON PAUL!


Or maybe I just don't want a pocket full of useless tickets at the end of the night.  If I bring $50 cash and only spend $10 dollars, I can spend $40 somewhere else after I leave.  If I buy 100 tickets and only spend 20, are you going to take my other 80 in exchange for gas, groceries, etc?
 
2014-01-08 01:56:31 PM  
This thread reads like the Tea Party invading Fark.
 
2014-01-08 01:59:17 PM  
Iowa sounds fat.
 
2014-01-08 01:59:17 PM  
How do they prevent counterfeit tickets?
 
2014-01-08 01:59:35 PM  
It's a way to make more money for the organizers.

Best case, it's a layer of inconvenience and hassle for customers and vendors. Worst case, it screws them over.

But I'm sure the free market will take care of it.
 
2014-01-08 02:00:35 PM  
 Lots of festivals get a cut of the sales or a flat rate (which ever ends up being more) so vendors will under report sales to pay a smaller cut.

Food vendors do not report total sales to the State Fair, but pay 17.5 percent of their revenue as rent; the fair received about $1.7 million from food sales in 2013, Chappell said. That does not include beer sales.

so... yeah... state fair food vendors are not honest and state fair organizers suspect them of 'skimming' cash off the top...  decide that inconveniencing the end-customer is a small price to pay for getting their 'fair' share from the vendors.
 
2014-01-08 02:01:29 PM  

dittybopper: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.




I've got some coupins!


Yep. Pretty much any outdoor event in Texas runs on the coupin currency system. It's a ripoff no matter how you slice it, but it's there to make the organizers tons of money and keep cash out of the hands of the bored 16-20 year-olds manning the stalls. You'll notice the coupin booths are always manned by tight-fisted blue-hairs, the only ones they trust with the cash.
 
2014-01-08 02:02:06 PM  
The Texas State Fair has been doing this for years with the food.  Same with the Midway.   The people that run the Fair want to make sure they get their full portion of the sales.  Regulating through tickets is the only way to accomplish that.
 
2014-01-08 02:04:02 PM  

Sofa King Smart: Lots of festivals get a cut of the sales or a flat rate (which ever ends up being more) so vendors will under report sales to pay a smaller cut.

Food vendors do not report total sales to the State Fair, but pay 17.5 percent of their revenue as rent; the fair received about $1.7 million from food sales in 2013, Chappell said. That does not include beer sales.

so... yeah... state fair food vendors are not honest and state fair organizers suspect them of 'skimming' cash off the top...  decide that inconveniencing the end-customer is a small price to pay for getting their 'fair' share from the vendors.


Wait, you mean that carnies aren't honest and ethical?  I'm shocked. Shocked!
 
2014-01-08 02:08:19 PM  

Pinner: Because the min. wage food vendor/methheads steal cash.
That's why.


The fairground/fair board/ state wants to make sure they get a percentage of sales. That's what its about, not employee theft, pinhead.
 
2014-01-08 02:08:41 PM  

FrancoFile: Sofa King Smart: Lots of festivals get a cut of the sales or a flat rate (which ever ends up being more) so vendors will under report sales to pay a smaller cut.

Food vendors do not report total sales to the State Fair, but pay 17.5 percent of their revenue as rent; the fair received about $1.7 million from food sales in 2013, Chappell said. That does not include beer sales.

so... yeah... state fair food vendors are not honest and state fair organizers suspect them of 'skimming' cash off the top...  decide that inconveniencing the end-customer is a small price to pay for getting their 'fair' share from the vendors.

Wait, you mean that carnies aren't honest and ethical?  I'm shocked. Shocked!


I, too, am shocked by this revelation... who would have thought carnies with their close-set eyes and rat-like features would be less than honest with either fair organizers or their customers.

www.dvdactive.com
 
2014-01-08 02:09:06 PM  

morgen_benner: If I bring $50 cash and only spend $10 dollars, I can spend $40 somewhere else after I leave. If I buy 100 tickets and only spend 20, are you going to take my other 80 in exchange for gas, groceries, etc?


Don't assume you're going to eat $50 worth of deep fried butter in a day. Problem solved.

As someone else said, beer festivals do this. In that case, it pretty much has to be to keep the vendors honest, because any fool can tell you that you want your booze customers making purchasing decisions after they've had a few as opposed to when they show up sober.
 
2014-01-08 02:09:22 PM  

little Jeff: The Texas State Fair has been doing this for years with the food.  Same with the Midway.   The people that run the Fair want to make sure they get their full portion of the sales.  Regulating through tickets is the only way to accomplish that.


Most booths at festivals and fairs up my way take debit, but they pay a flat rate to rent the space not a percentage of sales. Midways have always done the ticket thing, but more and more are switching to the "pay for the day" model.
 
2014-01-08 02:09:53 PM  
So, use one of the 50 booths to purchase tickets vs the probably 5 ATM machines with a big line and that damn $3 processing fee, I'll take the tickets.

It's just easier to deal in tickets than having the vendors run out of change because everyone is paying in 20's. X item costs x tickets, hand over tickets, boom, done. Way more efficient. The less time I have to stand in line behind some jerk who has trouble with basic math, the better.
 
2014-01-08 02:09:59 PM  

Sofa King Smart: FrancoFile: Sofa King Smart: Lots of festivals get a cut of the sales or a flat rate (which ever ends up being more) so vendors will under report sales to pay a smaller cut.

Food vendors do not report total sales to the State Fair, but pay 17.5 percent of their revenue as rent; the fair received about $1.7 million from food sales in 2013, Chappell said. That does not include beer sales.

so... yeah... state fair food vendors are not honest and state fair organizers suspect them of 'skimming' cash off the top...  decide that inconveniencing the end-customer is a small price to pay for getting their 'fair' share from the vendors.

Wait, you mean that carnies aren't honest and ethical?  I'm shocked. Shocked!

I, too, am shocked by this revelation... who would have thought carnies with their close-set eyes and rat-like features would be less than honest with either fair organizers or their customers.


oops... should have been Joe Dirt from his 'carny' days...  preview is your friend.
 
2014-01-08 02:11:21 PM  

Madbassist1: Pinner: Because the min. wage food vendor/methheads steal cash.
That's why.

The fairground/fair board/ state wants to make sure they get a percentage of sales. That's what its about, not employee theft, pinhead.


well I see this point has been covered ad nauseum, so I retract my pinhead comment.

Wait.
No I don't

;)
 
2014-01-08 02:11:39 PM  

Madbassist1: The fairground/fair board/ state wants to make sure they get a percentage of sales. That's what its about, not employee theft, pinhead.


It can be both. State fairs don't have to abide by the usual federal minimum wage. Would you trust someone to handle cash for 3 bucks an hour?
 
2014-01-08 02:12:02 PM  

FrancoFile: Wait, you mean that carnies aren't honest and ethical? I'm shocked. Shocked!


Look, maybe one day UNICEF will get into the carnival food business, but until then, they are the people to see.
 
2014-01-08 02:14:18 PM  
The company I work for is working on a much better cashless system for amusement parks.

The system uses wristbands, which the customers can tie in to their credit card, or to a prepaid cash account. At each vendor, ride, and venue, they simply scan their wristband to pay for their purchases. The customers can also set spending limits on their accounts, track their spending throughout the day, etc. For venues which require reservations, they can prepay at the gate, then simply scan their wristband at the venue to enter.

In the case of a prepaid account, they can also recharge their account at any ATM or designated booth in the park. Since any unused amount is refunded at the end of their stay, customers do not have to worry about putting too much into the prepaid account. The customer can choose to receive their refund as a money order or check, or can  have it deposited directly into their bank account.
 
2014-01-08 02:14:44 PM  
Came here to see some internet know-it-all's explain why using bitcoin would be better.

/leaving disappointed
 
2014-01-08 02:15:53 PM  
Has anyone mentioned that the Texas State Fair does this?
 
2014-01-08 02:18:09 PM  

pute kisses like a man: I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


The fair wants a cut of the sales and can't depend on the vendors to accurately report sales. When the tickets are redeemed by the vendors, the fair will keep a percentage of the value of the tickets. (The vendors know this and have already factored the percentage into the pricing of their products.)
 
2014-01-08 02:19:49 PM  

weltallica: [tagn.files.wordpress.com image 400x267]

It's money that's made just for the park.  It works just like regular money, but it's, er..."fun".


What lot did you park in?
 
2014-01-08 02:20:21 PM  

Loreweaver: The company I work for is working on a much better cashless system for amusement parks.

The system uses wristbands, which the customers can tie in to their credit card, or to a prepaid cash account. At each vendor, ride, and venue, they simply scan their wristband to pay for their purchases. The customers can also set spending limits on their accounts, track their spending throughout the day, etc. For venues which require reservations, they can prepay at the gate, then simply scan their wristband at the venue to enter.

In the case of a prepaid account, they can also recharge their account at any ATM or designated booth in the park. Since any unused amount is refunded at the end of their stay, customers do not have to worry about putting too much into the prepaid account. The customer can choose to receive their refund as a money order or check, or can  have it deposited directly into their bank account.


do you work for Disney?  because that sounds a lot like the wrist band system that Disney wants to implement.
 
2014-01-08 02:20:55 PM  

Loreweaver: The company I work for is working on a much better cashless system for amusement parks.

The system uses wristbands, which the customers can tie in to their credit card, or to a prepaid cash account. At each vendor, ride, and venue, they simply scan their wristband to pay for their purchases. The customers can also set spending limits on their accounts, track their spending throughout the day, etc. For venues which require reservations, they can prepay at the gate, then simply scan their wristband at the venue to enter.

In the case of a prepaid account, they can also recharge their account at any ATM or designated booth in the park. Since any unused amount is refunded at the end of their stay, customers do not have to worry about putting too much into the prepaid account. The customer can choose to receive their refund as a money order or check, or can  have it deposited directly into their bank account.


Not even once.
 
2014-01-08 02:23:01 PM  
Better than this...

watchdog.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com
 
2014-01-08 02:24:20 PM  
Taste of Chicago has done this for as long as I can remember.

I know I'm getting cheated on some vendors rounding tickets up to the nearest 50 cents, but it makes purchasing much quicker since there's no waiting for change.

Though I'm pretty sure it was first introduced as a legal way around a bunch of laws to better protect the vendors from the city.
 
2014-01-08 02:24:32 PM  
I HATE the ticket system. Gay Pride in Phoenix 2001... now known as Gay Shame: Friends of mine had come up from UofA in Tucson and we had each bought at least $30 in tickets for beer. We had already paid $10 for admission, so we're already $40 in the hole (tee-hee.)

About 20 minutes in, a microburst comes out of nowhere and blows shiat all over the place. Tent and canopy stakes were yanked out of the ground and sent across the park, tables were overturned. I was at the dance canopy behind one of the DJs, holding on to a pole, like a stripper, trying to keep it from blowing away. Had to let go. The microburst totally devastated the events, and it was then I knew that God really did hate us. The aftermath was ugly. Lesbians in ripped flannel, drag queens with smeared makeup, and jockstraps and cockrings just lying about in the rubble.

Then the cops and park security came through and started throwing everybody out. We asked them about our beer tickets. They said, "Too bad. Get out." We've boycotted every year since.
 
2014-01-08 02:28:00 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Lesbians in ripped flannel,


Would you care to expand upon that thought, you know, for academic reasons?
 
2014-01-08 02:29:28 PM  
I'm sure there's a name for it, but it's the same as games' cash shops where instead of buying stuff, you buy credits to spend on stuff. The purpose is two-fold: To distance people for the actual value of their money (What's more expensive, $5 or 70 credits? Who the fark knows) and to increase revenue by having people spend more than they would buying items directly (leftover credits).

It's not convenient, it's profitable.
 
2014-01-08 02:31:18 PM  

LadySusan: How do they prevent counterfeit tickets?


The tickets have the info and the year on them. For example, instead of saying "Redeem This Ticket" or something a generic ticket would say, they'll have "Iowa State Fair 2014" on them rendering them useless even for next year.
 
2014-01-08 02:31:49 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: I HATE the ticket system. Gay Pride in Phoenix 2001... now known as Gay Shame: Friends of mine had come up from UofA in Tucson and we had each bought at least $30 in tickets for beer. We had already paid $10 for admission, so we're already $40 in the hole (tee-hee.)

About 20 minutes in, a microburst comes out of nowhere and blows shiat all over the place. Tent and canopy stakes were yanked out of the ground and sent across the park, tables were overturned. I was at the dance canopy behind one of the DJs, holding on to a pole, like a stripper, trying to keep it from blowing away. Had to let go. The microburst totally devastated the events, and it was then I knew that God really did hate us. The aftermath was ugly. Lesbians in ripped flannel, drag queens with smeared makeup, and jockstraps and cockrings just lying about in the rubble.

Then the cops and park security came through and started throwing everybody out. We asked them about our beer tickets. They said, "Too bad. Get out." We've boycotted every year since.


static.gamespot.com
 
2014-01-08 02:38:55 PM  
The reasons for the coupons make sense, but it adds to the feeling I already have that I'm being ripped off. So, I just don't go to events like this. Seems like a win/win, as these events don't seem short of crowds.
 
2014-01-08 02:39:15 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: I HATE the ticket system. Gay Pride in Phoenix 2001... now known as Gay Shame: Friends of mine had come up from UofA in Tucson and we had each bought at least $30 in tickets for beer. We had already paid $10 for admission, so we're already $40 in the hole (tee-hee.)

About 20 minutes in, a microburst comes out of nowhere and blows shiat all over the place. Tent and canopy stakes were yanked out of the ground and sent across the park, tables were overturned. I was at the dance canopy behind one of the DJs, holding on to a pole, like a stripper, trying to keep it from blowing away. Had to let go. The microburst totally devastated the events, and it was then I knew that God really did hate us. The aftermath was ugly. Lesbians in ripped flannel, drag queens with smeared makeup, and jockstraps and cockrings just lying about in the rubble.

Then the cops and park security came through and started throwing everybody out. We asked them about our beer tickets. They said, "Too bad. Get out." We've boycotted every year since.


I busted a gut laughing at that. That was some pretty funny shiat right there.

+1 interwebs for you
 
2014-01-08 02:48:47 PM  

WhyKnot: Loreweaver: The company I work for is working on a much better cashless system for amusement parks.

The system uses wristbands, which the customers can tie in to their credit card, or to a prepaid cash account. At each vendor, ride, and venue, they simply scan their wristband to pay for their purchases. The customers can also set spending limits on their accounts, track their spending throughout the day, etc. For venues which require reservations, they can prepay at the gate, then simply scan their wristband at the venue to enter.

In the case of a prepaid account, they can also recharge their account at any ATM or designated booth in the park. Since any unused amount is refunded at the end of their stay, customers do not have to worry about putting too much into the prepaid account. The customer can choose to receive their refund as a money order or check, or can  have it deposited directly into their bank account.

do you work for Disney?  because that sounds a lot like the wrist band system that Disney wants to implement.


No, not for Disney. We were approached by an amusement company that heard about Disney's new system, and wanted a similar but simpler (AKA cheaper) version.
 
2014-01-08 02:53:21 PM  
Three reasons.

1)Obamacare makes credit proxies file their own 1099 about what they accepted for you. Thus the IRS knows exactly what was paid to the vendor.

2) The fair gets their cut off the top, plus any leftovers.

3) Vendors can now hire the worst carny trash around and not worry about them making change or pocketing the till.
 
2014-01-08 03:01:33 PM  
I dislike this format for food sales, i am okay with it for rides though.   Food sales need to be quick and easy and having to manage tickets to pay for your food is just going to add major frustration for many and a longer wait inline as undoubtedly instead of getting out of line a person needing more tickets will send a family member to buy them.
 
2014-01-08 03:05:40 PM  
Also if I plan in advnace I want say $15.00 worth of tickets and only use $10.00 worth I can't get a refund for the unused tickets. I think this is where the real advantage to the fair is.
 
2014-01-08 03:10:05 PM  
The real reason that vendors don't like this is that they aren't declaring all their earnings with the cash system to avoid taxes. The tickets will be accountable.
 
2014-01-08 03:14:56 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: Came here to see some internet know-it-all's explain why using bitcoin would be better.

/leaving disappointed


Bitcoin is not popular among the Fark userbase. In concept or implementation.

/ well... accept as a target of mockery
 
2014-01-08 03:23:23 PM  

WhiskeySticks: LadySusan: How do they prevent counterfeit tickets?

The tickets have the info and the year on them. For example, instead of saying "Redeem This Ticket" or something a generic ticket would say, they'll have "Iowa State Fair 2014" on them rendering them useless even for next year.


That might work for a single day event, although there's enough money to make counterfeiting worth it even for a single day. The wristband idea mentioned above looks good although it might be possible to hack it.
 
2014-01-08 03:24:42 PM  
I wonder why I don't go to things like that any more.

Oh right. Overcrowded, sticky hot weather, unsanitary, unhealthy food, and they want you to pay for bullshiat tickets up front.

Also they're boring as fark.
 
2014-01-08 03:38:50 PM  

pute kisses like a man: I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


Buyers always end up with more tickets that don't get used.  So you buy 20 tickets for $20, cuz that's a nice round number.  Your meal is 6 tickets.  You get 3 things then are left with 2 tickets.  Pure profit for the ticket seller.
 
2014-01-08 03:41:22 PM  
The Buffalo Wing Fest uses a ticket system to get your wings and other foods from the vendors. Prices went up this last year though. Tickets remained $1 each, but it used to be 2 tickets for 3 wings, and the 2013 fest it was 1 ticket for "a jumbo wing". Man, the best part of getting 3 wings was that you and a friend could get different kinds and trade back and forth to sample more flavors. (also the fact that meant wings went from a palatable $0.66 to $1 each, which is ridiculous. No way are chicken wings worth $1 each, no matter how "jumbo" you say they are.)
 
2014-01-08 03:49:39 PM  
"It's for your convenience."
 
2014-01-08 04:14:54 PM  

WhyKnot: do you work for Disney? because that sounds a lot like the wrist band system that Disney wants has already to implemented.


FTFY was just there 2 weeks ago.
 
2014-01-08 04:15:22 PM  
A friend of mine went to King Richard's Faire in southern Mass this past fall and said they were doing the ticket approach for food vendors. She described it as more of a pain in the arse than anything. With cash, you just spend what you want when you see what you want. With tickets, you have to budget what you want and when you want it. There are plenty of places to get tickets, but you've got to have enough in hand at the right time. Want a sandwich and a drink, and then the girlfriend wants a sandwich too? You might have to go back for more tickets before you can get your food.

I believe she said at KRF they were selling tickets in $5 increments, so if you wanted $6 worth of food, you had to buy $10 worth of tickets - either giving you $4 to use elsewhere, or $4 to pawn off. Just another tick against the convenience of cash.

It does take the spontaneity factor away, too. If you have $5 in your pocket, you can buy that bottle of water or stick of chocolate-covered bacon that you want now. If you have to find a place to get tickets first, it might keep you from doing so.

Yeah, it makes us sound fat, but come on, we're talking about fairs, not some health-food symposium.

/friend's not fat
//I suppose I am
 
2014-01-08 04:26:54 PM  

happydude45: That's what the Texas State Fair has always done. No big deal.


I've never left without a few unspent tickets in my pocket.  Free money for the fair.
 
2014-01-08 04:40:31 PM  

happydude45: That's what the Texas State Fair has always done. No big deal.


Another example of Intelligent design in Texas. It is easy to see why Texans don't believe in evolution...It skipped most of them....
 
2014-01-08 05:16:48 PM  

LadySusan: WhiskeySticks: LadySusan: How do they prevent counterfeit tickets?

The tickets have the info and the year on them. For example, instead of saying "Redeem This Ticket" or something a generic ticket would say, they'll have "Iowa State Fair 2014" on them rendering them useless even for next year.

That might work for a single day event, although there's enough money to make counterfeiting worth it even for a single day. The wristband idea mentioned above looks good although it might be possible to hack it.


Correct, hacking is a concern with any electronic system. I know that for our design, we've been working out the details on how to encrypt and isolate the data, how to properly secure the network/WIFI communications, and how to verify that only authorized devices can access the system.

Part of my job is ensuring that a hacker can't get at the data, nor can they spoof the data, even if they have physical access to the devices.
 
2014-01-08 05:25:16 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: I HATE the ticket system. Gay Pride in Phoenix 2001... now known as Gay Shame: Friends of mine had come up from UofA in Tucson and we had each bought at least $30 in tickets for beer. We had already paid $10 for admission, so we're already $40 in the hole (tee-hee.)

About 20 minutes in, a microburst comes out of nowhere and blows shiat all over the place. Tent and canopy stakes were yanked out of the ground and sent across the park, tables were overturned. I was at the dance canopy behind one of the DJs, holding on to a pole, like a stripper, trying to keep it from blowing away. Had to let go. The microburst totally devastated the events, and it was then I knew that God really did hate us. The aftermath was ugly. Lesbians in ripped flannel, drag queens with smeared makeup, and jockstraps and cockrings just lying about in the rubble.

Then the cops and park security came through and started throwing everybody out. We asked them about our beer tickets. They said, "Too bad. Get out." We've boycotted every year since.


I'm getting a bad visual.
 
2014-01-08 05:34:09 PM  
Came to read about the state of the art of State Fair food vending.  Funnelcakes is the only thing mentioned ... leaves disappointed.
 
2014-01-08 05:39:33 PM  
dittybopper:
[www.ticketloot.com image 192x255]

I've got some coupins!


---- AND WE'RE DONE HERE.
(Came for this.)
 
2014-01-08 06:13:47 PM  

pute kisses like a man: I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


All of Denver's street festivals use this system.  I think it is a way of taxing food sales--the food vendors do not get as much per ticket as I paid for them.
 
2014-01-08 06:21:46 PM  

Fano: I assume this will work like Dave and buster's where the tickets suddenly don't seem tied to money


Or...

www.matteoionescu.com
 
2014-01-08 06:38:28 PM  
And this is why I rarely go to the big Renaissance Faire near us. They force you to buy tickets in allotments that are nearly impossible (if not impossible)  to redeem exactly due to the way they price all the concessions. So you always end up with extra tickets: IOW you lose cash. Plus, iirc, they change the ticket colors each day so that you can't even use them later. WTF?
 
2014-01-08 06:40:37 PM  

gryhnd: And this is why I rarely go to the big Renaissance Faire near us. They force you to buy tickets in allotments that are nearly impossible (if not impossible)  to redeem exactly due to the way they price all the concessions. So you always end up with extra tickets: IOW you lose cash. Plus, iirc, they change the ticket colors each day so that you can't even use them later. WTF?


hotdogs          10pc / pk
hotdog buns    8pc / pk
 
2014-01-08 06:43:09 PM  
Murican $ ain't good enuff no more?

Stupid idea. I hate the ticket system too. The joy of finding a festival in summer that takes actual money for beer...
 
2014-01-08 07:07:22 PM  
The article clearly states the tickets don't expire and can be used the next year
 
2014-01-08 07:21:21 PM  

Ritley: The article clearly states the tickets don't expire and can be used the next year


Until they change their mind.
 
2014-01-08 07:25:20 PM  

BafflerMeal: Ritley: The article clearly states the tickets don't expire and can be used the next year

Until they change their mind.


If they try to do it after they have already sold tickets they are in for an old fashioned sue'in
 
2014-01-08 07:32:57 PM  
No more a "crisis" than any other sweeping change would be.


img.fark.net

/Iowan
//don't care that much
///state fair is just a money suck anyway
 
2014-01-08 07:50:44 PM  

Sgt Otter: Fano: I assume this will work like Dave and buster's where the tickets suddenly don't seem tied to money

Or...

[www.matteoionescu.com image 300x200]


Good point.

At any rate, the consumer isn't coming out ahead on this deal.
 
2014-01-08 09:56:16 PM  

pute kisses like a man: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.

I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?


I'm sure there are two very good reasons: first, state fairs are often very badly managed by people who normally would have no business running a lemonade stand much less a multi-million dollar festival. Second, this is a way to make sure that none of the vendors misrepresent their sales and cheat the the fair out of their percentage of the take.

It will almost certainly cost more and reduce overall revenue, but if the people who make the decisions about this type of thing perceive that it provides a personal advantage to themselves, it will continue.
 
2014-01-08 10:42:09 PM  
A lot of the reasons I've heard in this thread for them switching to the tickets make it sound like cash could still be king at the booths,

and perhaps at a discount.
 
2014-01-08 11:42:12 PM  
This is how it's always worked with the rides...
 
2014-01-09 12:11:13 AM  

CoonAce: Came to read about the state of the art of State Fair food vending.  Funnelcakes is the only thing mentioned ... leaves disappointed.


I don't suppose you could add to the food thread... no, that would be asking too much.
 
2014-01-09 12:39:47 AM  

SecretAgentWoman: Funnel cakes = crack with powdered sugar.

[shutupandtakemymoney.jpg]


Done in one.  Dammit those things are good.
 
2014-01-09 04:21:40 AM  
Yea, I saw this with "Fair St. Louis" here: 7 tickets for $10.

3 tickets for a hot dog.  5 tickets for a beer.  Just an impossible clusterfark of Prime numbers, so you have to buy multiple packs of tickets and always be left with one or two you can spend on NOTHING.

/But still go see the Butter Cow.
//The Butter Cow is AWESOME!

/Been to the Iowa State Fair.  Coors Light and Beefburgers FTW!!!
 
2014-01-09 01:27:47 PM  

BafflerMeal: hotdogs 10pc / pk
hotdog buns 8pc / pk


True enough. But I can stick my wieners in the freezer for later.

The wife suggests I do that to myself on occasion too...
 
2014-01-09 03:30:17 PM  

Ritley: The article clearly states the tickets don't expire and can be used the next year


You mean I have to go back to Iowa next year to get to use the rest of my money? I don't see how you think this matters.
 
2014-01-09 04:29:16 PM  

The Larch: pute kisses like a man: FrancoFile: Sybarite: How are you supposed to know in advance how much deep fried crap you can shovel down your gullet until explosive diarrhea sets in? That number can vary vastly over a lifetime.

Never fear.  There will be ticket purchase booths scattered everywhere.

Lots of wine & beer festivals do the same thing.

I'm sure there's a legal reason for this. But us there a business reason? Are sales better or worse with tickets?

I'm sure there are two very good reasons: first, state fairs are often very badly managed by people who normally would have no business running a lemonade stand much less a multi-million dollar festival. Second, this is a way to make sure that none of the vendors misrepresent their sales and cheat the the fair out of their percentage of the take.

It will almost certainly cost more and reduce overall revenue, but if the people who make the decisions about this type of thing perceive that it provides a personal advantage to themselves, it will continue.


sounds like the most accurate of explanations.

vendors misrepresent earnings so the fair makes less.  and the fair doesn't want a flat fee, because it wants high performing stands, so it must take off the top, which can only be done by taking all the cash.

because, I know for myself, ticket requirements mean I am buying less.  I have regularly withheld from purchasing something because I didn't feel like waiting in two lines.
 
2014-01-09 06:36:55 PM  

stewbert: Ritley: The article clearly states the tickets don't expire and can be used the next year

You mean I have to go back to Iowa next year to get to use the rest of my money? I don't see how you think this matters.


It was in response to someone who said that they would change each year to prevent counterfeit.
 
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