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(Time)   Australian researchers discover the world of wine has become a virtual monoculture, where Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot have become alcohol's version of Coke and Pepsi while other grapes are marginalized   (business.time.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, Pepsi, monocultures, University of Adelaide, grapes, chardonnay, cultivation  
•       •       •

666 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Jan 2014 at 7:50 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-08 07:58:04 AM  
Why do we always talk "grapes" when talking about wine?  My stepmother-in-law makes very delicious wine from such diverse fruits as black and red currants, blackberries, raspberries, and crab apples.

You want diversity, and new, interesting flavor, get wine made from currants.
 
2014-01-08 07:58:28 AM  
 I really, really prefer red blends myself. I'm not sure why, maybe just the first good red I was ever introduced to (at a time I could appreciate wine) was a red blend. Maybe I really just like the complex/mix of flavors, dunno.
 
2014-01-08 08:02:34 AM  

dittybopper: Why do we always talk "grapes" when talking about wine?  My stepmother-in-law makes very delicious wine from such diverse fruits as black and red currants, blackberries, raspberries, and crab apples.

You want diversity, and new, interesting flavor, get wine made from currants.


Technically that's not "wine", it's specifically labelled "fruit wine".  Fruit wine is closer to a "wine cooler" than to wine.

/loves me a good Shiraz
//even a bad one
 
2014-01-08 08:03:40 AM  
Add Chardonnay to the list, and you have three types of wine well worth avoiding. There are too many other excellent wine varieties (and, as said above, why stick to grapes?) for anyone to subject themselves to these.
 
2014-01-08 08:09:22 AM  

jakomo002: /loves me a good Shiraz
//even a bad one


You know who else liked a good Shiraz?

www.alicia-logic.com

Richard B. Riddick. Escaped convict. Murderer.
 
2014-01-08 08:11:26 AM  
Article is more about marketing and consumers who buy for familiarity (and too avoid fear).  More to say in a bit.


Here's FrancoFile's list of overlooked grapes to hunt down. Grocery stores should have some of these, a good wine shop will have most or all.

Red
Cabernet Franc  - France and US (especially Virginia, North Carolina, and the Ohio Valley)
Mencia  - Spain
Refosco  - Italy
Pinotage  - South Africa
Bonarda  - Argentina and Australia
Carmenere  - Chile
Blaufrankisch  - Austria

White
Chenin Blanc  - France, US, South Africa
Viognier  - France, US, Australia
White Rhone varietals or blends (Marsanne, Roussane, Grenache Blanc)  - France, US, Australia
Torrontes  - Argentina
Gruner Veltliner  - Austria
Verdicchio  - Italy
 
2014-01-08 08:12:02 AM  
I'm a big Chinon fan. Not a huge fan of heavy tannin wines, but I don't like a lot of whites. Chinon fits the bill. Chinons are great red wines for white wine drinkers.
 
2014-01-08 08:13:47 AM  

sinanju: I'm a big Chinon fan. Not a huge fan of heavy tannin wines, but I don't like a lot of whites. Chinon fits the bill. Chinons are great red wines for white wine drinkers.


Chinon you crazy diamond.
 
2014-01-08 08:16:23 AM  
As a wine lover that can't stand Merlot and Cab I'm getting a kick.
 
2014-01-08 08:19:28 AM  

jakomo002: /loves me a good Shiraz


I'm more of a fan of Syrah.
 
2014-01-08 08:23:15 AM  

xanadian: jakomo002: /loves me a good Shiraz

I'm more of a fan of Syrah.


The two grapes that were crossed to make that are nearly extinct.  There is about one acre of one type and about 7 acres of the other type and individually they make nasty wine.
 
2014-01-08 08:23:50 AM  
FrancoFile:  Mencia

Just a bad copy of other, better, wines
 
2014-01-08 08:29:46 AM  
A friend turned me on to Carignan. Can't get enough of the stuff. Kind of hard to find though.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carignan
 
2014-01-08 08:34:34 AM  
I like a nice Gewurztraminer, or a slightly dry Riesling.

As with metal bands, the more umlauts on the label, the better.
 
2014-01-08 08:40:07 AM  
About my comment re: fear.
I have worked on-and-off in the wine industry most of my life, since I was 13.  This comes from a pretty good observational base.

Wine (especially at retail) is just about the only aesthetic good (functional + pleasurable) that people buy with negative emotions.  For a number of reasons, which I will expound on later, many people in the US have a mindset that their opinions and desires on wine are uninformed, and that only the real experts can steer you through it.

Other products are bought with excitement and hope; positive emotions.
When you go a candy store, you say "I really love caramel - what do you have with caramel that's really good?"
When you go to a shoe store, you say "I think those peep-toe two-tone shoes are cute, show me some of those."
When you do landscaping, you say "I've always dreamed of having a lilac bush in my back yard, ever since I was a kid. Help me figure out where to plant a lilac bush behind my new house!"

What do I hear when people who are not everyday wine drinkers come into a wine store?
"My brother in law invited us to dinner. He knows a lot about wine. Show me something that I won't be embarrassed if I bring it over."
"My girlfriends are really picky, and I don't want to piss them off. Just give me a Pinot Grigio that everybody knows."
"I'm planning an engagement party and I don't want to spend a lot of money. Just give me the cheapest Merlot you have that doesn't suck."

Consider how weird it would be if you went to Blockbuster and said "I'm having a girl's weekend.  Show me some romantic comedies that don't suck."

The risk-reward ratio has been skewed.  People are avoiding displeasure, rather than seeking out pleasure.

Why has this happened?
a) Too many people at retail in the wine industry love to be able to lord it over their customers. You find this in women's clothing and automobiles, too, but it's rampant in wine.
b) Too many *consumers* with a little bit of knowledge love to lord it over their fellow consumers.  A wine snob on the public side of the wine-tasting bar is 10 times worse for business than a wine snob behind the counter.
c) The major importers, the advertising people, and the magazines are incentivized to make things as complicated and obscure as possible, so that they can sell more magazines and books, run more commercials, and charge the producers bigger consulting fees.
d) American culture is still not a wine culture, in the way that Italian, French, & Spanish culture are. We aren't brought up thinking that wine is a normal, everyday thing to have on the dinner table, just like butter, bread, salt, and pepper.
e) The producers - especially the Europeans, but that's finally changed in the last 20 years - are dinosaurs when it comes to taste and to information.
= websites are loaded with animation, Flash, sound, etc. Their PR and web people want to tell the consumer how to experience things.  They should be *asking* the consumer "what would you like to know."
= too much advertising is in the mode of "You should buy my wine because I am the best producer in region XYZ". That's meaningless to a global consumer who's 6000 miles from region XYZ.  They should be saying "You should buy my wine because it's just tart enough to enjoy with foods A and B, but mellow enough to drink on its own while the kids are having their bath."
= lack of product information on the label. People want to know the grapes, production technique, weather, size of crop, appellation, etc. "This is good, trust me" doesn't cut it. And as an old Frenchman-turned-American colleague told me, they want a 'petite histoire' - a little story.  One paragraph on the back that makes a connection between the producer and the consumer. It can be as simple as "My 2nd son Jacques likes to experiment in the cellar; he mixed up this blend in 2004 for us to have at home with the harvesting crew. In 2009 we were able to release it to the public, and we call it 'last bunch' because we don't serve it until every grape has been plucked from the vines."
 
2014-01-08 08:41:36 AM  
Who cares?  Whenever they do blind studies, even the experts can't tell what they are drinking.  There was that one study that showed how they couldn't even tell white from red.

As long as it doesn't taste repulsive, the rest of the talk about flavor and grapes and soil is pretty much marketing.
 
2014-01-08 08:50:26 AM  

manimal2878: Who cares?  Whenever they do blind studies, even the experts can't tell what they are drinking.  There was that one study that showed how they couldn't even tell white from red.

As long as it doesn't taste repulsive, the rest of the talk about flavor and grapes and soil is pretty much marketing.


I can tell the difference. For instance, red wine tastes like tannic shiat and white wine like vinegary shiat. See? There's a difference!
 
2014-01-08 08:58:46 AM  
There is always going to be good wine (insert food/entertainment/ect.) for people who are willing to go the extra mile and show real interest in the subject.

For the vast majority, we are looking for simple and easy.  It doesnt make it right but it does make for a nice, affordable Saturday night.
 
2014-01-08 09:05:43 AM  

FrancoFile: Pinotage  - South Africa


Just a phenomenal flavor. The best red I've had recently was a Pinotage/ Shiraz blend. It was as close to a perfect wine for my palate as I've ever tasted.
 
2014-01-08 09:13:52 AM  

FrancoFile: The risk-reward ratio has been skewed. People are avoiding displeasure, rather than seeking out pleasure.


Or they're purchasing it reluctantly because they, for whatever reason, just never bothered to learn anything about wine. Because of that, they assume it is way more complicated than it really is. If they had table wine sitting about all the time, this may be different; if they grew up drinking wine, again, different.

Culturally America is weird about drinking, letting a teenager have a glass of wine in the US is well into OMG MOMOFTHEYEAR terrirtory (and that's in the Fark sense, not the good sense).
 
2014-01-08 09:22:59 AM  
I don't drink wine, but my wife like's Moscato/Roscato so I buy those for her.

Only wine I ever actually enjoyed was some ice wine from Canada. And maybe a box of Franzia with an ample amount of vodka poured in.
 
2014-01-08 09:31:19 AM  
i.walmartimages.com
Goes nice with a Swanson's TV dinner.
 
2014-01-08 09:36:28 AM  
31.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-01-08 09:51:49 AM  

verbaltoxin: manimal2878: Who cares?  Whenever they do blind studies, even the experts can't tell what they are drinking.  There was that one study that showed how they couldn't even tell white from red.

As long as it doesn't taste repulsive, the rest of the talk about flavor and grapes and soil is pretty much marketing.

I can tell the difference. For instance, red wine tastes like tannic shiat and white wine like vinegary shiat. See? There's a difference!


Except you haven't done this while blindfolded. The issue he brings up was psychosomatic, in that the color and label 'informed' people and the brain made up the rest.

It's why expensive ass bottles taste better when you buy them but score the same as the regular stuff when everyone is double blind tested.

There's difference, sure. But it's apparently difficult to tell when you're not informed of what you're drinking.
 
2014-01-08 09:54:01 AM  

dittybopper: sinanju: I'm a big Chinon fan. Not a huge fan of heavy tannin wines, but I don't like a lot of whites. Chinon fits the bill. Chinons are great red wines for white wine drinkers.

Chinon you crazy diamond.


Ha Ha, Syrah  you are.
 
2014-01-08 10:11:04 AM  

sinanju: I'm a big Chinon fan. Not a huge fan of heavy tannin wines, but I don't like a lot of whites. Chinon fits the bill. Chinons are great red wines for white wine drinkers.


FYI, Chinon is a light-bodied Loire valley Cab Franc.
 
2014-01-08 10:15:33 AM  

Sybarite: [I am not drinking any farking merlot!]

CFTLS.

 
2014-01-08 12:17:01 PM  

FrancoFile: sinanju: I'm a big Chinon fan. Not a huge fan of heavy tannin wines, but I don't like a lot of whites. Chinon fits the bill. Chinons are great red wines for white wine drinkers.

FYI, Chinon is a light-bodied Loire valley Cab Franc.


Mrs. Sinanju and I spent two weeks touring the Loire Valley a few years ago.  It's where I ran into it.  Stayed in this place in Chinon, itself: http://www.chateaudemarcay.com/
 
2014-01-08 12:17:13 PM  

verbaltoxin: manimal2878: Who cares?  Whenever they do blind studies, even the experts can't tell what they are drinking.  There was that one study that showed how they couldn't even tell white from red.

As long as it doesn't taste repulsive, the rest of the talk about flavor and grapes and soil is pretty much marketing.

I can tell the difference. For instance, red wine tastes like tannic shiat and white wine like vinegary shiat. See? There's a difference!


So you age your whites and drink your reds the day you buy them?
 
2014-01-08 12:31:28 PM  

kroonermanblack: verbaltoxin: manimal2878: Who cares?  Whenever they do blind studies, even the experts can't tell what they are drinking.  There was that one study that showed how they couldn't even tell white from red.

As long as it doesn't taste repulsive, the rest of the talk about flavor and grapes and soil is pretty much marketing.

I can tell the difference. For instance, red wine tastes like tannic shiat and white wine like vinegary shiat. See? There's a difference!

Except you haven't done this while blindfolded. The issue he brings up was psychosomatic, in that the color and label 'informed' people and the brain made up the rest.

It's why expensive ass bottles taste better when you buy them but score the same as the regular stuff when everyone is double blind tested.

There's difference, sure. But it's apparently difficult to tell when you're not informed of what you're drinking.


I'm absolutely certain even you would be able to tell the difference between a Chardonnay, a Muscato and a Cab while blindfolded.  In addition, anyone can tell the difference between a recently produced white that hasn't been abused and one that sat on a warm shelf for 10 years too long.  I'm also quite certain that you'd be able to tell the difference between a Pinot Noir that has been processed via méthode champenoise and one that was produced in the Burgundy region - even if the grapes used to produce the wines came from the same vineyard.

While most people (even the experts) can't rank the prices of 6 different Cabernet Sauvignons from the same region, and in many cases can't identify the region the wine came from if they were produced in different regions, that has nothing to do with what he was talking about - even as snarky as he's being.
 
2014-01-08 01:33:43 PM  
Zinfandel dammit!!
 
2014-01-08 01:43:52 PM  
I guess it was only a matter of time before a "Sideways" reference reared its head...

Ok.  My favorite red so far?

www.cheapwinefinder.com

There.

/There's also a little winery outside of Cambridge, VT that makes an awesome red...
 
2014-01-08 02:30:51 PM  
Why do they all taste like vinegar? I've had cheap. I've had expensive. All tasted like vinegar. The only one I could ever drink was a Japanese plum wine.
 
2014-01-08 02:31:00 PM  
The longer this problem continues, gewurtz it's going to get.

Okay, that's not even a good bad pun.

/I guess I was just trying to get a reisling out of people.
 
2014-01-08 03:09:16 PM  

ajax6677: Why do they all taste like vinegar? I've had cheap. I've had expensive. All tasted like vinegar. The only one I could ever drink was a Japanese plum wine.


Taste is affected by genetics.  Folks alergic to cilantro think it tastes like soap.  Some have genes that make many vegetables taste unpleasantly bitter -- it's not that they were bad kids not eating their veg... it really tastes bad to them.  It could be wine tastes like vinegar to you because you have a genetic makeup that under or over emphasizes certain components of the the taste of wine.
 
2014-01-08 03:12:04 PM  

ajax6677: Why do they all taste like vinegar? I've had cheap. I've had expensive. All tasted like vinegar. The only one I could ever drink was a Japanese plum wine.


I hear that all the time and don't understand it.  Yes, wine can often be tart.

But so are lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, etc.  Do you think those taste like vinegar?
 
2014-01-08 03:41:45 PM  
Mourvèdre.  Big, jammy stuff.  Give it an hour to breathe, though.
 
2014-01-08 04:07:58 PM  

xanadian: I guess it was only a matter of time before a "Sideways" reference reared its head...

Ok.  My favorite red so far?

[www.cheapwinefinder.com image 252x480]

There.

/There's also a little winery outside of Cambridge, VT that makes an awesome red...


Ooooh, I've been meaning to try that. (Love red blends).

sinanju: ajax6677: Why do they all taste like vinegar? I've had cheap. I've had expensive. All tasted like vinegar. The only one I could ever drink was a Japanese plum wine.

Taste is affected by genetics.  Folks alergic to cilantro think it tastes like soap.  Some have genes that make many vegetables taste unpleasantly bitter -- it's not that they were bad kids not eating their veg... it really tastes bad to them.  It could be wine tastes like vinegar to you because you have a genetic makeup that under or over emphasizes certain components of the the taste of wine.


I discovered that with turnips recently, my first time in my life ever having them, at an SCA event. It wasn't even psychosomatic, I thought I was gonna LOVE them. "Ooh, turnips au gratin! That sounds good. Cheese makes EVERYTHING amazing, anyways." *Takes bite* *Brain goes "HOLY shiat POISON WHAT ARE YOU DOOOIIINNGGG".

I swear it fired off every bitter sensor in my tongue.
 
2014-01-08 04:13:00 PM  

FrancoFile: About my comment re: fear.
I have worked on-and-off in the wine industry most of my life, since I was 13.  This comes from a pretty good observational base.

Wine (especially at retail) is just about the only aesthetic good (functional + pleasurable) that people buy with negative emotions.  For a number of reasons, which I will expound on later, many people in the US have a mindset that their opinions and desires on wine are uninformed, and that only the real experts can steer you through it.

Other products are bought with excitement and hope; positive emotions.
When you go a candy store, you say "I really love caramel - what do you have with caramel that's really good?"
When you go to a shoe store, you say "I think those peep-toe two-tone shoes are cute, show me some of those."
When you do landscaping, you say "I've always dreamed of having a lilac bush in my back yard, ever since I was a kid. Help me figure out where to plant a lilac bush behind my new house!"

What do I hear when people who are not everyday wine drinkers come into a wine store?
"My brother in law invited us to dinner. He knows a lot about wine. Show me something that I won't be embarrassed if I bring it over."
"My girlfriends are really picky, and I don't want to piss them off. Just give me a Pinot Grigio that everybody knows."
"I'm planning an engagement party and I don't want to spend a lot of money. Just give me the cheapest Merlot you have that doesn't suck."

Consider how weird it would be if you went to Blockbuster and said "I'm having a girl's weekend.  Show me some romantic comedies that don't suck."

The risk-reward ratio has been skewed.  People are avoiding displeasure, rather than seeking out pleasure.

Why has this happened?
a) Too many people at retail in the wine industry love to be able to lord it over their customers. You find this in women's clothing and automobiles, too, but it's rampant in wine.
b) Too many *consumers* with a little bit of knowledge love to lord it over their ...


I agree.  As you see here in the comments all the wine snobs making it uncomfortable for us non-wine snobs because we don't know exactly what they are talking about and they like it that way.

Let's face facts, most of us hate life so we like to drink and forget about it.  What I drink is my own damn business I don't need people making fun of my choice of anesthetic.
 
2014-01-08 05:16:30 PM  
Zin for the win
 
2014-01-08 06:08:54 PM  
Malbec
 
2014-01-08 06:08:55 PM  
FrancoFile
ajax6677 Why do they all taste like vinegar? I've had cheap. I've had expensive. All tasted like vinegar. The only one I could ever drink was a Japanese plum wine.

I hear that all the time and don't understand it.  Yes, wine can often be tart.

But so are lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, etc.  Do you think those taste like vinegar?

Grapefruit juice literally tastes like stomach bile to me. Lemonade and cranberry juice are ok. None of them taste like vinegar.
 
2014-01-08 06:10:15 PM  
FrancoFile
ajax6677 Why do they all taste like vinegar? I've had cheap. I've had expensive. All tasted like vinegar. The only one I could ever drink was a Japanese plum wine.

I hear that all the time and don't understand it.  Yes, wine can often be tart.

But so are lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, etc.  Do you think those taste like vinegar?


Grapefruit juice literally tastes like stomach bile to me. Lemonade and cranberry juice are ok. None of them taste like vinegar.
 
2014-01-08 06:20:19 PM  

xanadian: I guess it was only a matter of time before a "Sideways" reference reared its head...

Ok.  My favorite red so far?

There.

/There's also a little winery outside of Cambridge, VT that makes an awesome red...


yeah the apothic blends are pretty decent and very affordable.

/zinfandel! but not that white zin atrocity
 
2014-01-08 06:44:18 PM  

ajax6677: FrancoFile
ajax6677 Why do they all taste like vinegar? I've had cheap. I've had expensive. All tasted like vinegar. The only one I could ever drink was a Japanese plum wine.

I hear that all the time and don't understand it.  Yes, wine can often be tart.

But so are lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, etc.  Do you think those taste like vinegar?

Grapefruit juice literally tastes like stomach bile to me. Lemonade and cranberry juice are ok. None of them taste like vinegar.


Dunno.  I guess you're highly sensitive to acidity, but I'd think you'd turn down lemonade & cranberry too (and I mean straight cranberry juice, not the Ocean Spray cocktail that's watered down and loaded with sugar).

The thing I don't get is that acetic acid (which is what makes vinegar vinegar) isn't present in wine. Other acids - malic, citric, etc., - but you only get acetic once the special vinegar bacteria have done their job.  Did your mother make you drink vinegar as a 'health' thing when you were a kid? It may be psychological (reacting to the smell and the other taste elements) and not physiological at all.

Not much you can do about that.  The best I can tell you is to try a Viognier sometime - it's a full-bodied white that tends to be lower in acidity, and is fruity and fleshy.
 
2014-01-08 06:55:47 PM  
FrancoFile:
The thing I don't get is that acetic acid (which is what makes vinegar vinegar) isn't present in wine. Other acids - malic, citric, etc., - but you only get acetic once the special vinegar bacteria have done their job.

To my genetic argument above, it may be that what he identifies in the taste of vinegar is not acetic acid at all... it's possible he has a reduced sensitivity to it.  So, those other components in wine vinegars that are also present in wine are what he's tasting.  I'd be interested in his reaction to pure white vinegar, which is pretty much just acetic acid and water.
 
2014-01-08 07:14:23 PM  

FrancoFile: Article is more about marketing and consumers who buy for familiarity (and too avoid fear).  More to say in a bit.


Here's FrancoFile's list of overlooked grapes to hunt down. Grocery stores should have some of these, a good wine shop will have most or all.

Red
Cabernet Franc  - France and US (especially Virginia, North Carolina, and the Ohio Valley)
Mencia  - Spain
Refosco  - Italy
Pinotage  - South Africa
Bonarda  - Argentina and Australia
Carmenere  - Chile
Blaufrankisch  - Austria

White
Chenin Blanc  - France, US, South Africa
Viognier  - France, US, Australia
White Rhone varietals or blends (Marsanne, Roussane, Grenache Blanc)  - France, US, Australia
Torrontes  - Argentina
Gruner Veltliner  - Austria
Verdicchio  - Italy


You left off the greatest red there is...Barbera.  Not sure where it originates, but if you're looking for a good growing area, Amador County/Fairplay, CA is where its at.
 
2014-01-08 07:30:55 PM  

Homegrown: FrancoFile: Article is more about marketing and consumers who buy for familiarity (and too avoid fear).  More to say in a bit.


Here's FrancoFile's list of overlooked grapes to hunt down. Grocery stores should have some of these, a good wine shop will have most or all.

Red
Cabernet Franc  - France and US (especially Virginia, North Carolina, and the Ohio Valley)
Mencia  - Spain
Refosco  - Italy
Pinotage  - South Africa
Bonarda  - Argentina and Australia
Carmenere  - Chile
Blaufrankisch  - Austria

White
Chenin Blanc  - France, US, South Africa
Viognier  - France, US, Australia
White Rhone varietals or blends (Marsanne, Roussane, Grenache Blanc)  - France, US, Australia
Torrontes  - Argentina
Gruner Veltliner  - Austria
Verdicchio  - Italy

You left off the greatest red there is...Barbera.  Not sure where it originates, but if you're looking for a good growing area, Amador County/Fairplay, CA is where its at.


I was going for overlooked & out of fashion.  Barbera is one of the 3 great red grapes of Italy, and anybody who drinks Italian with any frequency knows it.

Which reminds me, I forgot to mention Aglianico, which is mostly grown in southern Italy. If you like Petite Sirah and Zin and Malbec, you need to try Aglianico.

sinanju: FrancoFile:
The thing I don't get is that acetic acid (which is what makes vinegar vinegar) isn't present in wine. Other acids - malic, citric, etc., - but you only get acetic once the special vinegar bacteria have done their job.

To my genetic argument above, it may be that what he identifies in the taste of vinegar is not acetic acid at all... it's possible he has a reduced sensitivity to it.  So, those other components in wine vinegars that are also present in wine are what he's tasting.  I'd be interested in his reaction to pure white vinegar, which is pretty much just acetic acid and water.


Yeah.  Although I'd argue nature vs. nurture with you.  I think a lot of people have had their palates warped (or to be generous, trained) by particular good or bad experiences in their past, and that the memory of those experiences is a bigger factor in tasting than the actual sensory data of the moment.  And they consciously reinforce it as well.  "Layer Cake is such a great Shiraz, I've loved it ever since I first tried it 10 years ago." No - you loved it 10 years ago. But it's not the same wine today as it was then, because they make 100 times as much and buy grapes from everybody. What you love is your memory of the experience of 10 years ago, not the actual glass of wine in front of you today. Just look at how people get locked into genres of music, or cult TV shows.

I just smelled a bottle of white balsamic vinegar - which is ridiculously mild (thanks, Secretary Kerry). As in, you could drink a couple of tablespoons without gagging and coughing.  And then I smelled the glass of Chardonnay I'm having for dinner.  No overlap at all.
 
2014-01-08 07:31:51 PM  
Sorry, didn't mean that to be a single post...
 
2014-01-08 09:16:32 PM  
Fortified wines can be great. Sandeman 20 year Reserve Tawny Port  is one of the most delicious things I have ever tasted, and I am the type of person who thinks sherry is only fit to cook with.
 
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