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(CNN)   Big dumb jocks are really . . . big dumb jocks   (cnn.com ) divider line
    More: Fail, collegiate sports, CNN, test scores, achievement gap, UNC-Greensboro, University of Louisville  
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2526 clicks; posted to Sports » on 07 Jan 2014 at 8:00 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-08 12:00:48 AM  

revrendjim: Rapmaster2000: A friend of mine as a TA was pressured by the AD and his prof to pass a failing QB.  I would say that their academic integrity was violated, but it was Georgia.

That's funny. I have a friend who was a TA at Georgia and has the same story. Either we have the same friend or this kind of thing is fairly common there.


It was a huge problem which is why they had an academic scandal back in the 90s, I havent heard much about it any longer since Richt kicks players off for lying to him about their issues. Hell Auburns starting QB was kicked out of UGA after stealing from a walk on then lying about it.
 
2014-01-08 12:20:13 AM  

edmo: Could we just lay the "student athlete" fiction to rest and pay them for the services they offer?


This.  Academic institutions are selling their souls (and making themselves look retarded in the eyes of the non-athlete worshipping world) in order to provide cheap talent to the big leagues and rake in a lot of ill-gotten money (that I'm sure is going to finance women's water polo - yeah, that's the ticket!).

/Sorry, if you went to FSU, UNC or any other big-time NCAA school, I assume you're an athlete worshipping retard with shiat for brains.
//Don't like it? Do something to pull your alma mater out of this NCAA dung heap.
 
2014-01-08 12:37:44 AM  

Starshines: edmo: Could we just lay the "student athlete" fiction to rest and pay them for the services they offer?

This.  Academic institutions are selling their souls (and making themselves look retarded in the eyes of the non-athlete worshipping world) in order to provide cheap talent to the big leagues and rake in a lot of ill-gotten money (that I'm sure is going to finance women's water polo - yeah, that's the ticket!).

/Sorry, if you went to FSU, UNC or any other big-time NCAA school, I assume you're an athlete worshipping retard with shiat for brains.
//Don't like it? Do something to pull your alma mater out of this NCAA dung heap.


What's really, really sad is that football schools are still way, way better than online/for-profit diploma mills. If you can't play football/basketball, they will actually flunk you.
 
2014-01-08 01:02:13 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: You can tell who's dumb by the shiat they write on Twitter.
/Yes that includes the Auburn mom


If you're referring to the "can't he speak English" tweet, that was the mom of Alabama's quarterback.
 
2014-01-08 01:04:02 AM  
this guy disagrees:
images.politico.com
 
2014-01-08 01:07:25 AM  

divgradcurl: this guy disagrees:
[images.politico.com image 605x328]


I think he's the greatest but my dad says he doesn't work hard on defense.
 
2014-01-08 01:21:36 AM  
This isn't just a college issue. Any place where athletics and academics mix has this problem.

CSB time: My junior year of high school, I had a biology class with the starting quarterback of the football team. Now, the team was OK but not good enough to make the playoffs. But this guy thought he was hot shiat. He spent more time hitting on the cheerleaders in the class than doing any work. Being a school in the ghetto, there were a couple of gang members around and it was a damn miracle none of them tried anything on him (and I know for a fact they had talked about it because I heard them). Hell, I damn near tried to kick his ass after he crossed the line with me in his shiat talking.

And yet, either because he was the starting QB or (and this came to light a couple of years later) because he was African-American and the teacher was not only an African-American, but she was the adviser for the Black Student Union; he got the same grade I did and passed. And he did no more than 25% of the work everyone else did.

Conversely, one of the wide receivers for the team was in that class too and he just did his work and never wasted anyone's time.

The fact is that as long as athletics are held in such high esteem in academic institutions, there will be pressure to keep pushing the athletes in the popular sports up the ladder "because it's in the school's best interests." And as more and more money floods into colleges from TV deals with ESPN and the wannabe sports networks; it will get much worse before it gets better.

/For the record, the QB disappeared once he went to college
//the WR started going to Arizona State, but had to withdraw for family reasons
/shame because he really was a good guy
 
2014-01-08 01:30:52 AM  

divgradcurl: this guy disagrees:
[images.politico.com image 605x328]


apparently that pic is shopped, so i apologize for posting it. however, he is pretty smart
 
2014-01-08 01:39:55 AM  
Athletes at all levels are overly indulged and it hurts most of them more that it helps due to a simple fact:

out of every 1,000 high school athletes in a given major sport ( Football,baseball, Hockey, Basketball) perhaps only 50 will go on to play in college and of those maybe only 10 will get full ride scholarships to a major college to play their chosen sport.

out of every 1,000 college athletes maybe 100 will go on to play professionally in some manner , and of those 1 perhaps will be a super star who makes enough money to not have to worry much about a fall back plan for when his playing days are done.  Not to mention the super stars get the lion's share of endorsement deals.

female athletes while likely are less indulged than their male counterparts have an even harder road to finical Independence through their talents and that usually only in tennis or golf.  Pretty much any other sport females play professional does not pay enough even for the top athletes to retire on just their playing salaries.
 
2014-01-08 08:38:35 AM  

mr_a: None of the "A"s in NCAA stands for Academics


Agrees.
www.thelostogle.com
 
2014-01-08 10:05:02 AM  

IAmRight: Reverend J: NCAA is just a farm league

Not for 99.9% of student-athletes. You're aware that the NCAA governs dozens of sports across several divisions, right?


I'm referring to specifically the ones that make the NCAA boatloads of cash under the guise of being "student athletes" while exploiting them for no pay and not allowing them to make any money off of their talents.
 
2014-01-08 11:34:40 AM  

yakmans_dad: Anyone who was a TA has met dumb athletes. And dumb non-athletes.

After one of my friends flunked one of our school's basketball stars, the team's academic advisor told the star he could find him a friendlier teacher for the next semester. The star chose my friend because he was the first teacher who had challenged the star to learn.

Lots of athletes are given poisonous advantages, and some resent the Hell out of it.


My first semester of graduate school at KU, I had a robotics class with Sasha Kaun. He was a pretty sharp guy. I was pretty impressed.
 
2014-01-08 11:53:13 AM  

Starshines: This.  Academic institutions are selling their souls (and making themselves look retarded in the eyes of the non-athlete worshipping world) in order to provide cheap talent to the big leagues and rake in a lot of ill-gotten money (that I'm sure is going to finance women's water polo - yeah, that's the ticket!).

/Sorry, if you went to FSU, UNC or any other big-time NCAA school, I assume you're an athlete worshipping retard with shiat for brains.
//Don't like it? Do something to pull your alma mater out of this NCAA dung heap.


Yeah, UNC is definitely known for its lousy academics.  Barely in Top 50 of the global rankings.  If they don't knock it off, William & Mary or Brandeis might pass them or something.
 
2014-01-08 12:42:56 PM  

Reverend J: I'm referring to specifically the ones that make the NCAA boatloads of cash under the guise of being "student athletes" while exploiting them for no pay and not allowing them to make any money off of their talents.


The NCAA doesn't really make much off 'em. The member conferences and schools do.
 
2014-01-08 12:57:45 PM  
This annoys me:

FTFA:
Kadence Otto, who once taught at Florida State University, recalled one situation where an academic support tutor would call every week to check up on a starting player.
"I would say, 'He's not doing well. He can't read and write.' And (the tutor) said, 'Well, we'll see what we can do,'" Otto said. That stopped with a career-ending injury. "He's worth nothing to the team, and I never once heard back from the academic support adviser. He never showed up to class again, either."


So to be clear, Prof. Otto is distraught that FSU doesn't care about the football player after he gets hurt.  However, Prof. Otto doesn't bother to check up on the football player either.  Since the player stopped coming to class, he is no longer a concern to Prof. Otto.  Otto is just as bad as the support tutor.

This ignores that there is a strong chance the player voluntarily left the school permanently once he was off the team or for the rest of the semester to physically heal.
 
2014-01-08 12:59:31 PM  

balki1867: 1) I took a freshman class in college that was ~80% athletes.  Some of the athletes from non-revenue sports were cool, but the football players pretty much lived up to their stereotype.  This was at the University of Illinois too (our football team went 2-9 that year and this was a good season because we broke an 18-game losing streak).  It wasn't all of the football players, but a good number of them.
2) I TA'ed a class later in college.  Luckily it was an engineering class, so no athletes, but I caught two students cheating and was strongly discouraged from doing anything about it because of the paperwork and professor's time involved-- this stuff all cuts away from doing ground-breaking research which is what pays their bills. The moral of the story: busting a cheater is a pain even when they don't run a 4.6-second 40-yard dash.
3) I've met a couple of people who've played NCAA sports and were STRONGLY discouraged from being in certain majors, because their schoolwork would be seen as a distraction from building the coach's sportsball resume-- so even when athletes WANT TO LEARN, they are forced to choose between learning and getting playing time.


I TA-ed some freshman level classes at UIUC.  Always had a handful of athletes, and one semester ended up with a class 80% athletes.  The wrestlers were the hardest working students I ever had.  Super nice guys too.  Both were varsity 4 year guys.
 
2014-01-08 01:00:13 PM  

grimlock1972: out of every 1,000 high school athletes in a given major sport ( Football,baseball, Hockey, Basketball) perhaps only 50 will go on to play in college and of those maybe only 10 will get full ride scholarships to a major college to play their chosen sport.

out of every 1,000 college athletes maybe 100 will go on to play professionally in some manner , and of those 1 perhaps will be a super star who makes enough money to not have to worry much about a fall back plan for when his playing days are done.  Not to mention the super stars get the lion's share of endorsement deals.


Your numbers are way off, not nearly as many athletes move up levels like you say.
 
2014-01-08 01:19:35 PM  
Yeah? Do you make millions of dollars reading books?
 
2014-01-08 01:35:39 PM  

bacongood: Your numbers are way off, not nearly as many athletes move up levels like you say.


While I'd agree, he did say "at some level," and there are a LOT of little leagues that are technically professional but pay salaries similar to other entry-level jobs with a .001% chance of ever moving up. So it's possible that numbers are close to that.
 
2014-01-08 01:48:57 PM  

bacongood: grimlock1972: out of every 1,000 high school athletes in a given major sport ( Football,baseball, Hockey, Basketball) perhaps only 50 will go on to play in college and of those maybe only 10 will get full ride scholarships to a major college to play their chosen sport.

out of every 1,000 college athletes maybe 100 will go on to play professionally in some manner , and of those 1 perhaps will be a super star who makes enough money to not have to worry much about a fall back plan for when his playing days are done.  Not to mention the super stars get the lion's share of endorsement deals.

Your numbers are way off, not nearly as many athletes move up levels like you say.


I was sure they were i did not have exact numbers so i erred on the side of generosity, but even my numbers paint a sad story for the vast majority of high school athletes.
 
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