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(Forbes)   Why cold temperatures ground all those airliners. Here comes the science   (forbes.com) divider line 20
    More: Interesting, cold temperatures, landing gear, cold, major airline, tank truck, temperatures, airlines  
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2779 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Jan 2014 at 8:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



20 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-07 08:55:00 AM  
Cold temperatures, cell phones, box cutters...
 
2014-01-07 09:02:27 AM  
I thought it was cuz their wings froze up and didn't flap right.
 
2014-01-07 09:07:54 AM  
cold-ground? like cheese?
 
2014-01-07 09:14:00 AM  
Yeah, MSP just got hit by the cold snap (-25 with a -46 windchill) and we didn't have many problems. Keep your vehicles in the garage or keep them running, always topped off with fuel. Heat your glycol tanks. Wear good boots, a good hat, and heavy gear. The only problem we've run into the past few days are sick calls (riiiight, sick...) and at one point a handful of gas pumps stopped working. Gas, not diesel. I do feel for the aircraft mechanics, though. If they get a bad issue, those poor bastards can be stuck out in the cold for a long, long time.
 
2014-01-07 10:05:55 AM  
A friend's dad worked for United as a mechanic.  Got called to North Dakota in the winter to fix something.  Got the problem solved, fired it up, and the plane refused to move.  The tires had frozen to the runway.
 
2014-01-07 10:13:04 AM  
I know what it does to my vehicles and they're not leaving the ground. If they say that it's too cold for those planes to get off the ground safely, that's good enough for me.

WyDave: A friend's dad worked for United as a mechanic.  Got called to North Dakota in the winter to fix something.  Got the problem solved, fired it up, and the plane refused to move.  The tires had frozen to the runway.


My dad was a flight mechanic. He used to tell us horror stories about flying in and out of North Dakota.
 
2014-01-07 10:16:11 AM  
The air becomes denser, and it presses down t0o hard on those big wings.
 
2014-01-07 10:43:08 AM  
The scarves and mittens they have to put on the planes aren't aerodynamic enough for them to fly.
 
2014-01-07 10:46:47 AM  
I was really hoping for a more indepth article about the physics of flight and how most engines are created to work under extreme heat but not cold, and the affect the cold has on shrinking steel vs aluminum and how brittle plastics become.

I suspect this might prove why I am not much fun at parties.
 
2014-01-07 11:04:33 AM  

farbekrieg: I was really hoping for a more indepth article about the physics of flight and how most engines are created to work under extreme heat but not cold, and the affect the cold has on shrinking steel vs aluminum and how brittle plastics become.

I suspect this might prove why I am not much fun at parties.


No, it just shows how little fun you are outside at 30,000 feet where it's always cold. But then, you're not an aircraft brain scientist.
 
2014-01-07 11:04:37 AM  
It's also cold enough in some places that car antifreeze is freezing.

I think that's a good time to stay home.
 
2014-01-07 11:18:53 AM  

WelldeadLink: farbekrieg: I was really hoping for a more indepth article about the physics of flight and how most engines are created to work under extreme heat but not cold, and the affect the cold has on shrinking steel vs aluminum and how brittle plastics become.

I suspect this might prove why I am not much fun at parties.

No, it just shows how little fun you are outside at 30,000 feet where it's always cold. But then, you're not an aircraft brain scientist.


Because sky-cranes lift aircraft up to 30,000 feet where their engines are allowed to equilibrate with the local atmosphere before they are started, and aircraft are never started at ground level where conditions are much more mild before coming to working temperature and then ascending to cruising altitude. Its totally reasonable to assume that aircraft engines are always in a cryogenic state and not full of fire.
 
2014-01-07 11:25:40 AM  
Pro tip: you can run diesel engines on Jet fuel. So stop whining about the baggage cart tractor not running...
 
2014-01-07 12:20:29 PM  

mark12A: Pro tip: you can run diesel engines on Jet fuel. So stop whining about the baggage cart tractor not running...


The cart tractor will run, but not the union monkey driving it.
 
2014-01-07 12:36:46 PM  
The wings turn in to icebergs with the aerodynamic characteristics of the common house brick, at which point the plane is likely to plunge nose first in to something called Cumulus Granite.

I mean sure you can spray de-icer all over the damn things on the ground and they do have the capability to remove ice from the wings in flight but as such things have been farked up in the past and caused crashes... well...

/you should probably sit in the back anyway.
//Pilots don't generally reverse in to mountains.
 
2014-01-07 12:45:08 PM  

mark12A: Pro tip: you can run diesel engines on Jet fuel. So stop whining about the baggage cart tractor not running...


I think the sulphur content in the jet fuel breaks a bunch of laws if used in a ground vehicle.
 
2014-01-07 01:20:47 PM  
You know, none of these reasons are cause for shutdown here in Canada.  I recognize that US airports may not be designed in the same way to anticipate weather like this, and vehicles may not have block heaters, etc.   But seriously- blaming it on the freezing temperatures of glycol and diesel fuel?  That ground crews can't function properly?

Buy a pair of farking mittens pantywaists, and get on with your job.  It's just a little cold.
 
2014-01-07 01:42:02 PM  
/CSB

Loved watching A-10's taxi out in below-zero.  The tires had frozen with a flat spot, and they'd go thunka-thunka down the taxiway, while the pilot gets rattled like dice in a cup, lol
 
2014-01-07 02:23:04 PM  

poorjon: The scarves and mittens they have to put on the planes aren't aerodynamic enough for them to fly.


img.fark.net

Meh, it hasn't been a problem before.
 
2014-01-08 06:58:31 AM  
So people and ground equipment that aren't designed to operate when it's 40 below won't operate when it's 40 below? Thanks, science

/stupid
 
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