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(Some Guy)   There is nothing creepy at all about these photos if you consider the time and context in which they were taken. You might even consider them heart-warming -- GAAH TURN IT OFF TURN IT OFF (sort of graphic images)   (stevehuffphoto.com ) divider line
    More: Strange, image sensor, context  
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9216 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Jan 2014 at 1:55 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-07 01:01:35 PM  
The dog.
 
2014-01-07 01:09:47 PM  
Well, It's not Rotten, but some folks might find it a bit unsettling.
 
2014-01-07 01:10:29 PM  
Some were heartbreaking (the surviving twin with the doll, especially), others were nightmare fuel. All in all, I'm thoroughly creeped out. Well done, 19th century folk.
 
2014-01-07 01:15:51 PM  

nmrsnr: All in all, I'm thoroughly creeped out.


Indeed.
 
2014-01-07 01:23:45 PM  
Death was very close in those days.  Not an invisible industry like today.
 
2014-01-07 01:29:28 PM  
And you thought it was annoying when your parents made you pose with your *live* siblings.
 
2014-01-07 01:37:18 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: nmrsnr: All in all, I'm thoroughly creeped out.

Indeed.


Yup.
 
2014-01-07 01:42:43 PM  
You cannot kill them with fire, BECAUSE THEY ARE ALREADY DEAD!
 
2014-01-07 02:00:22 PM  
 
2014-01-07 02:02:58 PM  
Nothing personal, but that's creepy as all fark.
/Why did I click that link?
 
das
2014-01-07 02:03:12 PM  

Mitch Taylor's Bro: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: nmrsnr: All in all, I'm thoroughly creeped out.

Indeed.

Yup.

Me too.
 
2014-01-07 02:06:12 PM  
I'm glad that was greened in the morning and not at night where I am.
 
2014-01-07 02:07:56 PM  

2wolves: Death was very close in those days.  Not an invisible industry like today.


Yeah back then, oddly enough, in some places the only time you spent more than an hour in your living room at any one go was after you were dead.  Also you only used your front door once in your life (after marriage), and twice total (when you are taken out of the house to be buried).
 
2014-01-07 02:09:19 PM  
i could have done without that photoset

/dad is sad
 
2014-01-07 02:09:44 PM  
www.jesus-is-savior.com
 
2014-01-07 02:10:37 PM  

Wellon Dowd: [www.jesus-is-savior.com image 378x283]


Well played you magnificent bastard
 
2014-01-07 02:11:20 PM  
Most were pretty standard post-mortem photography, beautiful in its strange way. Then of course they slip in a few like the weird colorized one or the strange "looking in through the window" one just so there's no danger that someone leaves without being creeped out.

My favorite, though, is the dog. For some reason the leash is cracking me up.
 
2014-01-07 02:11:47 PM  
Why did it have to be kids?

/Feeling sad.
 
2014-01-07 02:14:07 PM  
Hm.  I wasn't creeped out, and I usually am by this type of thing.  The only one slightly 'weird' was the one taken from outside through the window of the child in bed.

Some of them were heartstring pulling.

But again as the blogger/others have stated, death wasn't something that was feared, or sadly, even unusual.  To have that one last chance to have a memory of someone you loved makes sense in its own context.
 
2014-01-07 02:20:45 PM  

Satan's Bunny Slippers: Hm.  I wasn't creeped out, and I usually am by this type of thing.  The only one slightly 'weird' was the one taken from outside through the window of the child in bed.

Some of them were heartstring pulling.

But again as the blogger/others have stated, death wasn't something that was feared, or sadly, even unusual.  To have that one last chance to have a memory of someone you loved makes sense in its own context.


This
 
2014-01-07 02:23:28 PM  
There is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we're the imagination of ourselves.


/hicks
 
2014-01-07 02:27:35 PM  
Back then the subject of a photograph had to hold very still for the duration of a long shutter opening.

These are photos of the best subjects.
 
2014-01-07 02:28:13 PM  
I wasn't creeped out, but having been through my grandmother's death at home, I have a different perspective now. Mostly I just felt awful for the parents, and curious as to what killed the child.
 
2014-01-07 02:31:40 PM  
My wife's friends had a picture taken of their stillborn child's hand resting on top of his mom's. The only thing that will haunt me more than that is the little casket at the funeral.
 
2014-01-07 02:33:23 PM  
My ex wife's family was into this. I found it creepy. They took photos of their deceased family members in their coffins... Group photos, posed shots. It was disturbing to me, and I'm a pretty creepy Addams Family kinda guy. They were also very touchy with the corpse. They'd kiss it, hold it's hand, and just be altogether too physical with the embalmed body than I would be comfortable with, myself.

Personally, I'm not fond of showings and open-casket funerals at all. I believe we should remember the person, not the meatsack they walked around in. The person was the personality, the mind, the actions-- The body, once void of these things, is just a body. At funerals, it's not even ALL the person you knew-- It's practically a wax dummy. The embalming process (and dying!) makes a person's body look unlike they did when there was life in them. I hate remembering my loved ones as a slab of processed meat in an expensive box. I think it's the worst possible way to say good bye to someone.

I have death phobias or anything like that. I accept death for what it is. But I just think it's gruesome to display corpses at all.

I can understand people doing this in the Victorian era, and the old days when a photograph was a rare thing. Their children died (because mortality rates were much higher, then) and the post-mortem photo was the only image they'd ever have of them. It was a necessary evil, so-to-speak.

But today? When you've already got pictures of the person when they were alive? Adding some corpse photos to the mix does NOT make sense to me. It creeps me right the fark out.

But as I said... This was my  ex-wife. My fiancee actually shares my opinion on this subject, thank goodness.
 
2014-01-07 02:34:26 PM  
Honestly these just mad me feel sad. The adults were no big deal, it was the kids that got me.
 
2014-01-07 02:34:54 PM  

ZeroCorpse: My ex wife's family was into this. I found it creepy. They took photos of their deceased family members in their coffins... Group photos, posed shots. It was disturbing to me, and I'm a pretty creepy Addams Family kinda guy. They were also very touchy with the corpse. They'd kiss it, hold it's hand, and just be altogether too physical with the embalmed body than I would be comfortable with, myself.

Personally, I'm not fond of showings and open-casket funerals at all. I believe we should remember the person, not the meatsack they walked around in. The person was the personality, the mind, the actions-- The body, once void of these things, is just a body. At funerals, it's not even ALL the person you knew-- It's practically a wax dummy. The embalming process (and dying!) makes a person's body look unlike they did when there was life in them. I hate remembering my loved ones as a slab of processed meat in an expensive box. I think it's the worst possible way to say good bye to someone.


OOPS...


I don'thave death phobias or anything like that. I accept death for what it is. But I just think it's gruesome to display corpses at all.


Meaning changed because I skipped one damned word.
 
2014-01-07 02:36:00 PM  
Egoy3k:
Yeah back then, oddly enough, in some places the only time you spent more than an hour in your living room at any one go was after you were dead.  Also you only used your front door once in your life (after marriage), and twice total (when you are taken out of the house to be buried).

I feel like this needs more explaining.
 
2014-01-07 02:37:58 PM  
robertlindsay.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-01-07 02:45:18 PM  
i41.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-07 02:45:19 PM  

animal900: Egoy3k:
Yeah back then, oddly enough, in some places the only time you spent more than an hour in your living room at any one go was after you were dead.  Also you only used your front door once in your life (after marriage), and twice total (when you are taken out of the house to be buried).

I feel like this needs more explaining.



He's saying they used the backdoor much more often in the past.
 
2014-01-07 02:47:29 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-01-07 02:51:10 PM  

ZeroCorpse: My ex wife's family was into this. I found it creepy. They took photos of their deceased family members in their coffins... Group photos, posed shots. It was disturbing to me, and I'm a pretty creepy Addams Family kinda guy. They were also very touchy with the corpse. They'd kiss it, hold it's hand, and just be altogether too physical with the embalmed body than I would be comfortable with, myself.

Personally, I'm not fond of showings and open-casket funerals at all. I believe we should remember the person, not the meatsack they walked around in. The person was the personality, the mind, the actions-- The body, once void of these things, is just a body. At funerals, it's not even ALL the person you knew-- It's practically a wax dummy. The embalming process (and dying!) makes a person's body look unlike they did when there was life in them. I hate remembering my loved ones as a slab of processed meat in an expensive box. I think it's the worst possible way to say good bye to someone.

I have death phobias or anything like that. I accept death for what it is. But I just think it's gruesome to display corpses at all.

I can understand people doing this in the Victorian era, and the old days when a photograph was a rare thing. Their children died (because mortality rates were much higher, then) and the post-mortem photo was the only image they'd ever have of them. It was a necessary evil, so-to-speak.

But today? When you've already got pictures of the person when they were alive? Adding some corpse photos to the mix does NOT make sense to me. It creeps me right the fark out.

But as I said... This was my  ex-wife. My fiancee actually shares my opinion on this subject, thank goodness.


Most of that is creepy. On the other hand, I understand that open-casket funerals can psychologically help people gain closure.

I've told my wife I'd like to be cremated, but really I don't care - whatever the family finds most comforting. IMO, that's what funerals are for - helping the living grieve.
 
2014-01-07 02:55:12 PM  

animal900: Egoy3k:
Yeah back then, oddly enough, in some places the only time you spent more than an hour in your living room at any one go was after you were dead.  Also you only used your front door once in your life (after marriage), and twice total (when you are taken out of the house to be buried).

I feel like this needs more explaining.


It's a UK thing. Two main rooms on the ground floor. The front room was used only for formal occasions or receiving visitors (like the Vicar). Most of the time, it stayed empty, and unheated The front door, too, was underused.
All the life of the house took place in the back room, which was next to the kitchen. Anyone who knew the family would tend to arrive at the back door.
It was still going on when I was a lad.
 
2014-01-07 02:56:15 PM  
I question the ones where the "dead" subject had their eyes open.  I did not think it was possible to retain live-looking eyes after death.  I suppose they could be fake eyes ("I want her eyes open in the picture - go fetch the taxidermist!"), but more likely somebody just saw a picture of a person looking slack-jawed and said "This must be a picture of a dead guy."
 
2014-01-07 02:56:28 PM  

Cagey B: Most were pretty standard post-mortem photography, beautiful in its strange way. Then of course they slip in a few like the weird colorized one or the strange "looking in through the window" one just so there's no danger that someone leaves without being creeped out.

My favorite, though, is the dog. For some reason the leash is cracking me up.


Well, he's certainly not going to heel...
 
2014-01-07 02:58:25 PM  
Photography was also different back then, too.   Many cameras couldn't do 'snapshots'.  You had to stand or sit in place for up to a few minutes at a time for a photo to come out anything sharper than "A complete blur".

Which...creepily enough...is easier when the subject is dead.
 
2014-01-07 03:02:13 PM  

Johnsnownw: Why did it have to be kids?

/Feeling sad.


The death of a child was a common thing back then that almost every family experienced.
 
2014-01-07 03:03:35 PM  

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: I question the ones where the "dead" subject had their eyes open.  I did not think it was possible to retain live-looking eyes after death.  I suppose they could be fake eyes ("I want her eyes open in the picture - go fetch the taxidermist!"), but more likely somebody just saw a picture of a person looking slack-jawed and said "This must be a picture of a dead guy."


I'm guessing you haven't been around a lot of corpses.
 
2014-01-07 03:04:06 PM  

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: I question the ones where the "dead" subject had their eyes open.  I did not think it was possible to retain live-looking eyes after death.  I suppose they could be fake eyes ("I want her eyes open in the picture - go fetch the taxidermist!"), but more likely somebody just saw a picture of a person looking slack-jawed and said "This must be a picture of a dead guy."


A dead person's eyes look flat and dry. Perhaps not totally noticeable from the distance these photos are taken. Also, the eyelids don't stay all the way open, making them look sleepy.
 
2014-01-07 03:04:07 PM  

Copperbelly watersnake: Johnsnownw: Why did it have to be kids?

/Feeling sad.

The death of a child was a common thing back then that almost every family experienced.


I think we should bring that back. It's a nice tradition and it makes the living family feel closer.
 
2014-01-07 03:05:08 PM  

FarkingReading: Copperbelly watersnake: Johnsnownw: Why did it have to be kids?

/Feeling sad.

The death of a child was a common thing back then that almost every family experienced.

I think we should bring that back. It's a nice tradition and it makes the living family feel closer.


The Jenny McCarthy crowd is working on it.
 
2014-01-07 03:07:56 PM  
Welp, gonna go home and hug my baby a little tighter.
 
2014-01-07 03:08:25 PM  

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: I question the ones where the "dead" subject had their eyes open.  I did not think it was possible to retain live-looking eyes after death.  I suppose they could be fake eyes ("I want her eyes open in the picture - go fetch the taxidermist!"), but more likely somebody just saw a picture of a person looking slack-jawed and said "This must be a picture of a dead guy."


ha, i used to be a medical student in a long ago life. they stare at you just fine till some professor demands you slice that eye open and it sprays all over you because eye juice is under pressure. then you quit and wait tables for 20 years. but no, that's the dead for you.
 
2014-01-07 03:11:38 PM  
i42.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-07 03:13:43 PM  

Orgasmatron138: I've told my wife I'd like to be cremated, but really I don't care - whatever the family finds most comforting. IMO, that's what funerals are for - helping the living grieve


I want to be cremated because I'd rather my loved ones not see my empty meatsuit, and it's cheaper for them to deal with - plus I could be kept on the mantle or mixed with cement and built into a garden gnome or something.

However I also don't want to miss out on my chance of coming back as a zombie, and I can't do that if I'm nothing but ashes.

Decisions, decisions.
 
2014-01-07 03:16:28 PM  

Tillmaster: animal900: Egoy3k:
Yeah back then, oddly enough, in some places the only time you spent more than an hour in your living room at any one go was after you were dead.  Also you only used your front door once in your life (after marriage), and twice total (when you are taken out of the house to be buried).

I feel like this needs more explaining.

All the life of the house took place in the back room, which was next to the kitchen. Anyone who knew the family would tend to arrive at the back door.


Makes sense.  I'm Canadian, born to an English mother.  I grew up in a townhouse complex and strangers would knock at the front door, but all the neighbours would come in mum's back door.
 
2014-01-07 03:18:32 PM  
Well before photography, death masks were somewhat common.
upload.wikimedia.org
Death masks may be mementos of the dead, or be used for creation of portraits. It is sometimes possible to identify portraits that have been painted from death masks, because of the characteristic slight distortions of the features caused by the weight of the plaster during the making of the mold.

Portrait of Bia de' Medici, suspected of being painted from a death maskj.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-01-07 03:22:47 PM  
Which one is dead in this picture?

www.stevehuffphoto.com
 
2014-01-07 03:24:28 PM  
I won't say that is the creepiest thing I have ever seen.
I just can't think of anything creepier.

This is creepier that some of obsessive crap I've seen people do in the Deep South.
 
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