If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Wired)   Remembering the RAMAC: a refrigerator-sized hard drive with five whole MBs of storage. But hey in 1956 that was a lot, and it worked   (wired.com) divider line 107
    More: Cool, RAMAC, Albert Hoagland, dry cask storage, Santa Clara University, air conditioning units, paper of record, refrigerators, first computer  
•       •       •

3505 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Jan 2014 at 8:11 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



107 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-01-07 12:07:47 PM

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: aerojockey: namatad: FFS, I do enough research to know that we will always want more processing power. That some problems are NP complete.
Which means that you never talk about more processing power, you talk about better algorithms.

Same for running out of disk space.
PLEASE

I remember using techniques like disk compression to squeeze out a few extra megabytes back in the 90s.

I don't know about you, but I've not felt the need to conserve disk space in a long time.  I have two operating systems installed on my SSD (one 32-bit, one 64) and it's running at about 15% usage.  My hard disk is running at 36%.  Computer is two years old.

These days, the vast majority of storage is used for multimedia, and I there isn't a lot of return you get these days for packing more data into existing media types.

Audio files are pretty much as large as they're gonna get.  In 1 terabyte, you can store about 50 full-length symphonies, in uncompressed 16-bit PCM at 44 kHz... with each instrument getting its own track.

I suppose photographs (and maybe monitors) will improve their resolution, so you'll need four to ten times as much to store photos and screenshots, but we're getting close to the point higher resolution doesn't help much.

The main growth in need for media storage would be motion pictures: certainly there is a lot of room for improvement.  But that will be limited because of bandwidth.

Basically, the current trends point to slower growth for storage needs in the future.  What could break this wide open again, and put us back on the path of storage scarcity, is new media.  3D projected surfaces anyone?  HD quality images from any vantage point.

Interactive media (i.e., games) are another thing pushing growth; the interactivity basically adds another dimension to the storage needs.  But these days high-end games are completely photorealistic.  Finer meshes and textures won't get you a lot.  Realism in the future will come from things like better motion, which won't n ...


Based on past experience, every prediction like this is an iron-clad guarantee that future storage needs will only accelerate, not level off ;-)

Well, how else will we store vast libraries of ultraporn?
 
2014-01-07 01:05:05 PM

Markoff_Cheney: im 31 and i feel like the youngest motherfarker who read every post in the thread.  im trying to remember what the first family computer had for memory, processor etc.   pretty sure it was a pentium 1 rocking like 66mhz with like 2-300 megs on the HD.  i do remember swapping and storing up games on 3" floppies for the shiatty macs we had in elementary/ middle school.  and old number munchers/oregon trail/whatever that farking drawing thing was with the farking turtle.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logo_%28programming_language%29
 
2014-01-07 01:34:25 PM

Markoff_Cheney: pentium 1 rocking like 66mhz with like 2-300 megs on the HD.


Wow you missed pretty much all of the 8bits (Spectrum FTW!) and the 16bit era as well (Atari ST vs Amiga, we all know the ST was superior so shadup).

You were spoiled!  In my day we had to use sticky tape to hold the RAM expansion pack in place if we wanted the Kempston interface for the joystick plugged in as well!

/37yrs old.
 
2014-01-07 02:06:02 PM
We had a Commodore ADAM, C64 and VIC 20 at home.

My school started out with

i.imgur.com

Good old Commodore PET. OS on a chip, you could turn it on and work. Then we got 386 SX/25s running... I believe DOS 3 and in some ways it seemed like a downgrade lol. "I have to wait for this thing to boot? Oh..."
 
2014-01-07 05:55:16 PM
I bought a 3TB backup drive at Costco last year for about $120. I was talking with a fellow computer nerd who is in his mid 50's about how long ago 3TB represented the entire worlds storage capacity.....

I figured it was well within our lifetimes, maybe the 60's?  Possibly the 70's?


Love to know the answer....
 
2014-01-08 12:13:03 AM

Rezurok: Markoff_Cheney: im 31 and i feel like the youngest motherfarker who read every post in the thread.  im trying to remember what the first family computer had for memory, processor etc.   pretty sure it was a pentium 1 rocking like 66mhz with like 2-300 megs on the HD.  i do remember swapping and storing up games on 3" floppies for the shiatty macs we had in elementary/ middle school.  and old number munchers/oregon trail/whatever that farking drawing thing was with the farking turtle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logo_%28programming_language%29


thats the one, thanks.

Vaneshi: Markoff_Cheney: pentium 1 rocking like 66mhz with like 2-300 megs on the HD.

Wow you missed pretty much all of the 8bits (Spectrum FTW!) and the 16bit era as well (Atari ST vs Amiga, we all know the ST was superior so shadup).

You were spoiled!  In my day we had to use sticky tape to hold the RAM expansion pack in place if we wanted the Kempston interface for the joystick plugged in as well!

/37yrs old.


had an atari, and one of my first experiences was it smoking and dying.  nintendo was as fancy as we got for awhile.
 
2014-01-08 09:14:48 AM
Marcus Aurelius:
Remember QEMM?

Remember? I still have the occasional flashback. QEMM, DESQView (and its evil twin, DESQView/X)...

My first non-retail job was doing telephone tech support for Quarterdeck. Apparently, my voice is auditory Xanax, so I quickly got moved into the "VIP queue", which was a nice way of saying "give Ratty the REALLY mad/frustrated/crazy callers - you know, the ones threatening legal action and meaning it - and he'll sort 'em out." And i did. Deflect, defuse, de-escalate. And, if I don't say so myself, I think I did it well. All of this long before the internet was a thing, using the customer as my eyes and hands, no remote control software or anything more than "type this, read me what it says" and trying to understand what kind of farkery was going on, where the farkery was coming into what should have been a smooth, functional system, and how to un-fark it. I still have a file folder at home of printed-out config.sys/autoexec.bat files because printing them out and faxing them in was faster than reading them aloud.

Getting off those marathon calls, after a successful troubleshoot was a high I can't reproduce with anything chemical. (And I've tried, believe me.) Sometimes I miss the hacking... fun stuff like seeing what I can do to get a 3com ethernet card to coexist with an IBM token ring MAU and have both NETBEUI and TCPIP coexisting so the little beastie can act as a bridge between networks.

CSB: With a particularly insane combination of ConcurrentDOS, QEMM, the 4DOS command.com replacement, and an overwhelming drive to see just how much I could abuse a computer one weekend, I managed to fit four simultaneous - AND functional - virtual machines into a 4mb-havin' 486dx/33, and each DOS machine had 637.4k available in main memory. It's fun to go into job interviews and be able to demonstrate that I have 19 years of virtualization experience. VMware didn't invent virtualization, they just put training wheels on it and made it slightly less user-hostile.

/ "safe mode"? "last known good configuration?" kids these days...
// no, son, you boot off a system floppy with no autoexec or config.sys, pop over to C:, edit the config.sys there, take the memory ranges off of the loadhi.sys statements, save and open autoexec, comment out MSCDEX because we don't need a damn CD-ROM right now, take the loadhighs out if there are any, save the changes, reboot, and pray the magic smoke stays inside the chips this time.
/// eh, i'm in a good mood. i guess you ain't gotta get off my lawn, but you'd damn well better clean up after yourself before you leave.
 
Displayed 7 of 107 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report