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(CounterPunch)   Electrolux sucking harder than Hoover these days   (counterpunch.org ) divider line
    More: Sad, Electrolux, Hoover  
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1761 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Jan 2014 at 1:25 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-06 01:30:52 PM  
But still not as hard as your Mom
 
2014-01-06 01:35:35 PM  
Amateurs.
deskofbrian.com
 
2014-01-06 01:41:53 PM  
I just had to overhaul the 2 electrolux vacs we have at work, and they are absolute piles of shiate. I need to do some research and hit up ebay for a couple of real commercial vacs.
 
2014-01-06 01:45:27 PM  

drewogatory: I just had to overhaul the 2 electrolux vacs we have at work, and they are absolute piles of shiate. I need to do some research and hit up ebay for a couple of real commercial vacs.


Check out Royal or Koblenz.  Both heavy duty industrial brands.
 
2014-01-06 01:48:32 PM  
FTFA: But Electrolux is not responsive to my question - what happened to Electrolux's vaunted reputation for lasting, if not forever, then for thirty or forty years?

Same as any other manufacturer of household appliances.  They're all computer controlled now, and the main boards are manufactured in some sweatshop in Southeast Asia and aren't designed to last 30 or 40 years.

"I would turn it over to the customer and she would say, in disbelief - that's not my (censored)," Marzullo recalls. "And I would say - yes it is. It sucks brand new, it's smells brand new, and it even looks close to brand new."
 
2014-01-06 01:50:19 PM  
Why would a vacuum cleaner (short of a Roomba) have a circuit board, in any meaningful sense, in the first place?  A big motor and a discrete switch. I'm not saying there haven't been improvements, but there were halfway decent vacuums 50 years before the transistor was invented.
 
2014-01-06 01:54:12 PM  
Genesee calls me a couple of days later. A brand new, top of the line Electrolux - Ultra One (listed at $799) - had been delivered to her home.

So they replaced the broken vacuum cleaner with a brand new one. What's the problem again?
 
2014-01-06 01:55:38 PM  
If it breaks down in two years when before it would last for 30 or 40 years, you can't tell me that's not deliberate. I am convinced they went down this road in search of more money and for no other reason."

What's deliberate is the quality of materials that get them to the price point the market wants.  They aren't deliberately building a shiat product, but they are deliberately building a product as cheaply as they can while still meeting product deadlines and a modicum of "quality".  This quality just might be lower than what you expect.

On the flip side, cars are significantly longer lasting than they were 40 years ago which is surprising because if collusion is the reason vacuum cleaners break then why isn't it a problem in automobiles considering there are fewer manufacturers of cars vs vacuums and that the auto industry has much higher barriers to access than the vacuum cleaner industry.  Didn't some Dyson guy just whip one up about 10 years ago?  Not to mention iRobot.
 
2014-01-06 01:57:00 PM  
I'm not opposed to upgrading when a new product does something the old one doesnt but its clear that the following statement has been made in a design meeting just about everywhere for the last 20 years:

 "Make widget x out of plastic instead of steel.  We'll save 47 cents per unit and we can count on the part breaking within 6 years.  The best part is we won't even sell plastic widget x, it will only come as part of assembly #323 and cost roughly 200 times what it costs to make plastic widget x!"

/I'd like to hunt them all down and kill them....
 
2014-01-06 01:58:25 PM  

Lawnchair: Why would a vacuum cleaner (short of a Roomba) have a circuit board, in any meaningful sense, in the first place?  A big motor and a discrete switch. I'm not saying there haven't been improvements, but there were halfway decent vacuums 50 years before the transistor was invented.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reluctance_motor comes to mind...
 
2014-01-06 02:00:41 PM  

Fizpez: I'm not opposed to upgrading when a new product does something the old one doesnt but its clear that the following statement has been made in a design meeting just about everywhere for the last 20 years:

 "Make widget x out of plastic instead of steel.  We'll save 47 cents per unit and we can count on the part breaking within 6 years.  The best part is we won't even sell plastic widget x, it will only come as part of assembly #323 and cost roughly 200 times what it costs to make plastic widget x!"

/I'd like to hunt them all down and kill them....


The market has shown that it prefers buying the cheapest of everything and then throwing it out and replacing it completely when it breaks with another new one.  You make widgets out of plastic to make the product cheaper and when it breaks it doesn't matter because your customers overwhelmingly throw out the product and buy a new one.

Then they complain that all the jobs went to China.
 
2014-01-06 02:07:14 PM  
I have an Electrolux vacuum, stove, fridge and a dishwasher. Really great products all I think. Very quiet, first of all, I can't tell if the dishwasher is running just by listening to it. I'm amazed when I hear other dishwashers how much noise they make.

I was a little suspicious of the stove, especially due to that whole circuit board thing. Everything's controlled by a touch screen. But, knock on wood, three years on, it's still going strong. Even the built-in meat thermometer is just as accurate as my separate one.

The only real problem I had was that the defrosting fan in the freezer was making noise. It was replaced under warranty, and that had been it.
 
2014-01-06 02:41:21 PM  
img.fark.netIf only.
 
2014-01-06 02:46:32 PM  

valkore: FTFA: But Electrolux is not responsive to my question - what happened to Electrolux's vaunted reputation for lasting, if not forever, then for thirty or forty years?

Same as any other manufacturer of household appliances.  They're all computer controlled now, and the main boards are manufactured in some sweatshop in Southeast Asia and aren't designed to last 30 or 40 years.


Get a real vacuum. This one has a motor, brush roll and a bag. That's all you need.

http://www.amazon.com/Eureka-Boss-Upright-Vacuum-1934B/dp/B00002N630

That's the cheapest version. The commercial quality versions of the same vacuum carry the Sanitaire brand name.
I have one like this made in 1987. It has outlasted three newer upright vacuums.
 
2014-01-06 02:47:48 PM  
Guy in the article talks about his three Electroluxes - one for each floor, which he bought in 1980 for $500 a piece. Using the US Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation calculator, that's $1,400 per vacuum in 2013 dollars. Nobody is willing to spend $1,400 on a vacuum.

It's not planned obsolescence. It's the fact that cost of materials have gone up while companies have tried to hit the same price points. Few people are willing or able to spend the extra cash on reliable gear.
 
2014-01-06 02:53:29 PM  
Also, that bulb that's been burning since 1901 is never turned off, and isn't bright enough to light a room.

Power-cycling is what wears down light bulbs. A modern incandescent will burn for a 100 years if it's left on the entire time.
 
2014-01-06 03:12:16 PM  
I bought a high-end Electrolux washer and dryer exactly a year ago this week. So far I have been very happy with them. I did end up spending about twice what I had originally intended to spend, but my brother talked me into it. He worked as an appliance repairman for a couple of years, and he said that he almost never had to work on the Electrolux machines because they never broke down. He said that none of the other brands that they sold were as reliable. I figured the guy who has to fix the shiat when it breaks is probably going to know a little more and be a little more open about which brands to buy than the guy who is looking for a commission and just wants to sell you the product with the biggest profit margin.

As far as the apparent quality of construction and components. they seem to be built very well. Like someone else mentioned above about a dishwasher, I couldn't believe how quiet the washer and dryer are. I used to have to turn up the television if I was washing clothes. Now I have to get up and check and make sure they are actually running. I'll be disappointed if I don't get 10 years out of them considering what I paid for them, but so far so good.
 
2014-01-06 03:20:19 PM  

Rapmaster2000: If it breaks down in two years when before it would last for 30 or 40 years, you can't tell me that's not deliberate. I am convinced they went down this road in search of more money and for no other reason."

What's deliberate is the quality of materials that get them to the price point the market wants.  They aren't deliberately building a shiat product, but they are deliberately building a product as cheaply as they can while still meeting product deadlines and a modicum of "quality".  This quality just might be lower than what you expect.

On the flip side, cars are significantly longer lasting than they were 40 years ago which is surprising because if collusion is the reason vacuum cleaners break then why isn't it a problem in automobiles considering there are fewer manufacturers of cars vs vacuums and that the auto industry has much higher barriers to access than the vacuum cleaner industry.  Didn't some Dyson guy just whip one up about 10 years ago?  Not to mention iRobot.


That's very easy to explain, actually. Cars are lasting longer, because they have tighter emissions standards they have to meet. All new cars have an 8 year/80,000 mile FEDERAL warranty on emissions parts (air pumps, catalytic converters, etc...) and on top of that they have to meet ridiculous mpg standards as well. If you make cars that fall apart, they'll be costing you a fortune in warranty payouts, and you'll end up sued for falsely claiming EPA mpg ratings (it's happened). Basically cars need to last a long time to meet emissions standards, so they're built better and better.

If Vacuum cleaners and toasters and everything else had to meet an 8 year "work at least until this point" goal, things would last longer and longer.
 
2014-01-06 03:23:34 PM  
I read that source as Cooter Punch.
 
2014-01-06 03:29:51 PM  
Electrolux makes Frigidaire nowadays. Mom bought a Frigidaire stove about four years ago. About 6 months after the warranty was up, the oven stopped heating. She had to spend $200 to get a circuit board replaced.

About a year ago, I bought an upright Frigidaire freezer. Lowe's delivered it, said to run it 24 hours before putting anything in it. Well, I ran it for 24 hours, and it was cooler on the outside than the inside. Lowe's said I needed to call the manufacturer. I called Electrolux, they said the store should have automatically replaced it. They contact the store. Next day, Lowe's brings out a new freezer. The replacement worked. I got a $50 check from Electrolux, and an additional 6 months tacked onto the warranty.

Overall, however, after those two experiences, I won't EVER buy anything Electrolux/Frigidaire again! Shiatty company.
 
M-G
2014-01-06 03:29:53 PM  

Rapmaster2000: On the flip side, cars are significantly longer lasting than they were 40 years ago


Cars also cost more than they did 40 years ago.  And cars do break, but you're spending that money on something that cost a lot more than $500.

But on home appliances, part of the problem is designing to a price point, and part is that we're in an era of demand for bells and whistles.  Look at an appliance parts catalog (like Marcone).  Common parts were used across multiple brands for years.  The cosmetics would be changed, but the major components remained the same.  A washing machine used to have a mechanical timer.  To accommodate the new features, they're now controlled by circuit boards, but they're being updated constantly, so when your board fails, you might find out that replacement parts aren't available.

I've got an original Maytag Neptune washer and dryer, purchased new in 1998.  This was a radical new design, and had plenty of issues.  They did recall work for the door seal and the circuit board.  One day ours ceased to enter fast spin.  This was due to the wax motor for the door lock burning out, and taking out a triac on the control board.  If you called a repair shop, it would have been several hundred dollars to fix (the official fix would require a new circuit board), so most people would opt to replace at that point.  Instead I bought about $16 worth of parts and fixed it myself.  They also have issues with the tub bearings, and I just ordered the parts to fix that as well.  Again, an official fix would involve replacing the entire inner drum, because it wouldn't be cost-effective for them to be pressing out bearings in the field.
 
2014-01-06 03:42:18 PM  
M-G:  your board fails, you might find out that replacement parts aren't available.

I'm not sure I'd agree with that.  A control board failed on my LG washer (worst quality ever), I found that it contained fairly standard parts.  The ICs, diodes, resistors, etc. were all off the shelf parts.  The problem would be the cost of determining which part failed and then replacing that.  At $300 for a new board, the cost of labor for replacing an individual part is not worth it for the average consumer.

That said, I'm not arguing against your assertion that a desire for more features coupled with a need to hit a low price point leads us to to this problem.
 
2014-01-06 04:03:15 PM  
A lot of classic companies went belly up, and then junk manufacturers bought up their names. It could be that Electrolux is one of those.
 
2014-01-06 04:28:46 PM  

Fizpez: I'm not opposed to upgrading when a new product does something the old one doesnt but its clear that the following statement has been made in a design meeting just about everywhere for the last 20 years:

 "Make widget x out of plastic instead of steel.  We'll save 47 cents per unit and we can count on the part breaking within 6 years.  The best part is we won't even sell plastic widget x, it will only come as part of assembly #323 and cost roughly 200 times what it costs to make plastic widget x!"

/I'd like to hunt them all down and kill them....


With the advent of fairly inexpensive home-use 3D printers there has been a surge of people not only printing their own replacement parts but improving on the original mfgr design so it does not fail again.  Even posting those CAD files on public forums for other 3D printer owners to use.
 
2014-01-06 04:30:10 PM  

albert71292: Electrolux makes Frigidaire nowadays. Mom bought a Frigidaire stove about four years ago. About 6 months after the warranty was up, the oven stopped heating. She had to spend $200 to get a circuit board replaced.

About a year ago, I bought an upright Frigidaire freezer. Lowe's delivered it, said to run it 24 hours before putting anything in it. Well, I ran it for 24 hours, and it was cooler on the outside than the inside. Lowe's said I needed to call the manufacturer. I called Electrolux, they said the store should have automatically replaced it. They contact the store. Next day, Lowe's brings out a new freezer. The replacement worked. I got a $50 check from Electrolux, and an additional 6 months tacked onto the warranty.

Overall, however, after those two experiences, I won't EVER buy anything Electrolux/Frigidaire again! Shiatty company.


So the company did all that for you and you wouldn't do business with them again? Really? Because that's exactly the kind of company I want to do business with.

When you have thousands of units rolling off an assembly line every day, you're bound to have a few duds along the way, to expect otherwise is simply foolish, it's how the company addressees those issues that matters.
 
2014-01-06 04:33:29 PM  

macdaddy357: A lot of classic companies went belly up, and then junk manufacturers bought up their names. It could be that Electrolux is one of those.


That's why I only buy Westinghouse televisions.

i.i.cbsi.com
 
2014-01-06 04:47:48 PM  

albert71292: Electrolux makes Frigidaire nowadays. Mom bought a Frigidaire stove about four years ago. About 6 months after the warranty was up, the oven stopped heating. She had to spend $200 to get a circuit board replaced.

About a year ago, I bought an upright Frigidaire freezer. Lowe's delivered it, said to run it 24 hours before putting anything in it. Well, I ran it for 24 hours, and it was cooler on the outside than the inside. Lowe's said I needed to call the manufacturer. I called Electrolux, they said the store should have automatically replaced it. They contact the store. Next day, Lowe's brings out a new freezer. The replacement worked. I got a $50 check from Electrolux, and an additional 6 months tacked onto the warranty.

Overall, however, after those two experiences, I won't EVER buy anything Electrolux/Frigidaire again! Shiatty company.


My frigidaire AC unit blew up in 2.5 years.  I threw it out.


4 years ago, our 20 year old friedrich AC unit died.  Thing was awesome, quiet and blasted coole air.  Sure it wasn't very efficirent of course.

Anyway, we replaced it with another friedrich, at a cost of 1K.  The motor, and circuit board blew about 2.5 years into it.  The warranty was only for 2 years.  They did replace the parts free after some arguing, but it still cost a lot for the service calls etc.

Honestly, they just don't make shiat like they used to.
 
2014-01-06 04:48:24 PM  
This is why my house has no carpeting. Not only do I not need to waste my money on a vacuum cleaner, but I don't have to debate the subject on the intertubes.

And, this will last for ever:

thumbs.dreamstime.com
 
2014-01-06 04:49:32 PM  
macdaddy357
A lot of classic companies went belly up, and then junk manufacturers bought up their names. It could be that Electrolux is one of those.


That happened to AEG.
In the 1990s, their household appliances subsidiary was bought up by some junk manufacturer called Electrolux...
 
2014-01-06 05:11:36 PM  
Bin_jammin: That's very easy to explain, actually. Cars are lasting longer, because they have tighter emissions standards they have to meet. All new cars have an 8 year/80,000 mile FEDERAL warranty on emissions parts (air pumps, catalytic converters, etc...) and on top of that they have to meet ridiculous mpg standards as well. If you make cars that fall apart, they'll be costing you a fortune in warranty payouts, and you'll end up sued for falsely claiming EPA mpg ratings (it's happened). Basically cars need to last a long time to meet emissions standards, so they're built better and better.

If Vacuum cleaners and toasters and everything else had to meet an 8 year "work at least until this point" goal, things would last longer and longer.


But I was told the government couldn't do anything the free market could do.
 
2014-01-06 05:14:20 PM  

drewogatory: I just had to overhaul the 2 electrolux vacs we have at work, and they are absolute piles of shiate. I need to do some research and hit up ebay for a couple of real commercial vacs.


At my hotel, we use Orecks. They are pretty durable and very easy to maintain or fix. At $250 and up, they aren't exactly cheap and they only do an average job of cleaning. I have one that's 8 years old now that gets used every day for hours, 365 days a year. I probably have about 5 hours and $50 into maintaining it.
 
2014-01-06 05:19:45 PM  
Nature abhors a vacuum...
 
2014-01-06 06:34:12 PM  

moos: Nature Electrolux abhors a working vacuum...

 
2014-01-06 06:40:08 PM  

Phil McKraken: Bin_jammin: That's very easy to explain, actually. Cars are lasting longer, because they have tighter emissions standards they have to meet. All new cars have an 8 year/80,000 mile FEDERAL warranty on emissions parts (air pumps, catalytic converters, etc...) and on top of that they have to meet ridiculous mpg standards as well. If you make cars that fall apart, they'll be costing you a fortune in warranty payouts, and you'll end up sued for falsely claiming EPA mpg ratings (it's happened). Basically cars need to last a long time to meet emissions standards, so they're built better and better.

If Vacuum cleaners and toasters and everything else had to meet an 8 year "work at least until this point" goal, things would last longer and longer.

But I was told the government couldn't do anything the free market could do.


The free market is why we are where we are. Companies could make a vacuum cleaner that lasted 30 years, but it would be expensive and you would go to Wal Mart and buy a $200 piece of plastic crap instead because it's cheaper. Why build an iPhone that will work for 10 years when you're going to buy the newest model 6 months down the road anyways because it has 14 more pixels and comes in different colors? We WANT cheap, disposable products, and that's what companies give us. Some people simply can't afford to pay $1,000 for a vacuum cleaner that lasts 30 years, and most of the people who can afford it don't want an appliance that they have to keep for 30 years. Imagine how tacky it will look in 10 years!! Probably won't even have a built-in MP3 player! Plus, I might have to actually save up for a few months to afford it. I want my gratification NOW!

If we were willing to pay for good quality items that would stand the test of time, companies would produce them. The market demands cheap, disposable junk, so that's what the manufacturers give us. It's simple supply and demand.
 
2014-01-06 07:10:21 PM  

Rapmaster2000: Fizpez: I'm not opposed to upgrading when a new product does something the old one doesnt but its clear that the following statement has been made in a design meeting just about everywhere for the last 20 years:

 "Make widget x out of plastic instead of steel.  We'll save 47 cents per unit and we can count on the part breaking within 6 years.  The best part is we won't even sell plastic widget x, it will only come as part of assembly #323 and cost roughly 200 times what it costs to make plastic widget x!"

/I'd like to hunt them all down and kill them....

The market has shown that it prefers buying the cheapest of everything and then throwing it out and replacing it completely when it breaks with another new one.  You make widgets out of plastic to make the product cheaper and when it breaks it doesn't matter because your customers overwhelmingly throw out the product and buy a new one.

Then they complain that all the jobs went to China.


That's it. Products are not built as well now as they were decades ago because people now won't pay that money. They will only buy cheaper products, which means the manufacturer has to sacrifice build quality to build them that cheap.

You can still get good stuff, like Miele washing machines for example. They will last twenty years in typical family use, but few people will pay the £800 they cost. They buy machines for £200-£300 and then wonder why they don't last.


And FTA:
"The documentary goes on to present evidence that the major light bulb manufacturers organized an international cartel to limit the life of the light bulb to 1,000 hours - including by fining the companies that make bulbs that lasted more than 1,000 hours."
How can they "fine" companies that build longer lasting bulbs? How can they enforce that cartel? How can they force companies to join, especially if they fine members for building good bulbs. Why would anyone join that cartel?
 
2014-01-06 07:19:29 PM  

mod3072: The free market is why we are where we are. Companies could make a vacuum cleaner that lasted 30 years, but it would be expensive and you would go to Wal Mart and buy a $200 piece of plastic crap instead because it's cheaper. Why build an iPhone that will work for 10 years when you're going to buy the newest model 6 months down the road anyways because it has 14 more pixels and comes in different colors? We WANT cheap, disposable products, and that's what companies give us. Some people simply can't afford to pay $1,000 for a vacuum cleaner that lasts 30 years, and most of the people who can afford it don't want an appliance that they have to keep for 30 years. Imagine how tacky it will look in 10 years!! Probably won't even have a built-in MP3 player! Plus, I might have to actually save up for a few months to afford it. I want my gratification NOW!

If we were willing to pay for good quality items that would stand the test of time, companies would produce them. The market demands cheap, disposable junk, so that's what the manufacturers give us. It's simple supply and demand.


That's why Miele washing machines look pretty boring.

This is a current Miele washer, and it comes with a ten year full guarantee.

img835.imageshack.us

This is a twenty year old Miele.
img577.imageshack.us


They don't change the styling. The machines are built to last twenty years so they don't make them look "up to date" so that they won't go out of date.
(They do now make some that look different, because they have a larger drum and door so they have to look different. But they still make ones that look like this so you can put it next to your twenty year old dryer and dishwasher and it will match.
 
2014-01-06 07:59:18 PM  
We had a Frigidaire stove - what a pain it was. Sometimes while I was cooking, the burner would decide to turn itself all the way to the maximum setting. You'd hear a click, and the burner would go to super red hot, you couldn't turn it off, and you'd have to turn off the circuit breaker to kill the power to the stove. There was a recall for a similar model that did the same thing, but my model wasn't on the list. I sent a report to the CPSC, and they actually called me and spent an hour on the phone with me, but it was never recalled. Apparently there were some faulty relays on the circuit board, which we replaced, but the problem eventually came back. Finally the stove top cracked (it was a glass smooth top) so we got rid of it. What a piece of crap.

I have an ancient Kirby vacuum which weighs a million pounds and won't die no matter what I do to it, but boy that thing can suck.
 
2014-01-06 08:28:00 PM  
If you want a good vacuum buy a used Kirby off of eBay.  You can get just about any part or bags from Amazon.
 
2014-01-06 08:34:24 PM  

Lawnchair: Why would a vacuum cleaner (short of a Roomba) have a circuit board, in any meaningful sense, in the first place?  A big motor and a discrete switch.


Because this is what an Electrolux looks like now:

img854.imageshack.us

It's got a HEPA filter that needs to be changed periodically, and the vacuum needs to know when that is.  It has a removable unit for steps, and the vacuum has to know when you haven't plugged the unit back in correctly.  It probably has a two or three stage switch to turn on the brushes or leave them off.  And I'm sure there's a light somewhere.  It's not that you can't do all that with plain old mechanical switches, it's that it's cheaper just to get a printed board and have it make the decisions for you.

Bin_jammin: Cars are lasting longer, because they have tighter emissions standards they have to meet. All new cars have an 8 year/80,000 mile FEDERAL warranty on emissions parts (air pumps, catalytic converters, etc...) and on top of that they have to meet ridiculous mpg standards as well.


That's a very small part of it.  The primary reason car quality has gone up so much is because the Japanese, and now the Koreans, made a concerted national effort to win market share by improving quality and keeping costs down.  Japan did it after WWII with low wages, and now Korea is doing it.  The secondary reason (but still hugely influential) is the massive improvement in materials and manufacturing.  My car has a stainless steel exhaust system.  That would have been prohibitively expensive 25 years ago on a cheap car.  My radiator housing (not the radiator itself, but the housing) is made of a fiberglass composite that won't melt at high temperatures.

Just think about the last time you heard someone complain about their engine block cracking.  It doesn't happen under normal use anymore.
 
2014-01-06 08:40:38 PM  
THERE IS MORE THAN ONE ELECTROLUX.

There were always 2 Electrolux companies, one in Sweden and one in the US. The Swedes got the rights to the name and the American Electrolux became Aerus.


www.aerusrichmondva.com
 
2014-01-06 09:54:19 PM  
liltingbanshee:
I have an ancient Kirby vacuum which weighs a million pounds and won't die no matter what I do to it, but boy that thing can suck.

We have what I thought was an ancient Kirby. It was handed down to us by a relative who passed, so we had no idea until we googled the model. Turns out it's only about 10 years old - it just looks hopelessly outdated. Not that it matters - Kirbys are great if you have small, crumb producing children like we do.
 
2014-01-06 10:30:19 PM  
Bought a refurbished Roomba for ~$150 on Woot a few years ago and I use it all the time. Not sure why you'd pay $500 for a vacuum cleaner that you have to push around yourself.
 
2014-01-06 11:33:30 PM  

MrEricSir: Bought a refurbished Roomba for ~$150 on Woot a few years ago and I use it all the time. Not sure why you'd pay $500 for a vacuum cleaner that you have to push around yourself.


That isn't a vacuum. It's a crumb catcher. If you want to actually dig the dirt out of your carpet you need a full-powered machine.

Suction is measured in air watts. The Aerus Guardian Platinum canister for instance, has 505 air watts of suction. The vaunted Dyson Ball has 160. I think an Oreck has 40.
 
2014-01-06 11:46:46 PM  
I never heard of Electrolux in the U.S. until a couple years ago. It just looks like it's become another fake-premium brand like Jenn Air and Kitchen Aid (besides their mixers).
Then I saw they took over Frigidaire in the late 90's...now I know why all their appliances are junk. (Whenever you see an appliance store advertising a cheap package deal as a 'Famous Brand', it is 9/10, Frigidaire).
 
2014-01-07 05:09:46 AM  
Because while the quality is great, the increase in quality is disproportionate to the increase in expense, that's why.  According to each company's website, Electrolux's cheapest upright is $229 and Hoover's is $70.  Think of it as paying three times as much for twice the quality.
 
2014-01-07 06:09:49 AM  
Anyone that pays $500 for a vacuum is an idiot.

/Eureka Boss FTW
 
2014-01-07 08:56:37 AM  
When I was a teenager in the 80s I could buy old shoes in a thrift store for a few bucks that were better quality than anything I can buy today for $100+
 
2014-01-07 10:26:39 AM  
Electrolux  had a refrigerator plant in Greenville, MI. Shut the whole thing down and moved it to Mexico. Now if you look at Consumers Reports it says their refrigerators are POS. HMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
 
2014-01-07 01:55:59 PM  
I tell this story any chance I get. I had a 10-year-old Kenmore-badged, Frigidaire-made (an Electrolux brand) washer that needed a substantial repair. I'm generally willing to pay to repair a thing rather than buy a new one because I hate the whole choosing & buying experience. Anyway, being Kenmore-badged, Sears is the only source for repair. They couldn't get the part and handled the whole backorder situation so poorly that after about a month of waiting, I junked that washer and have pretty well written off Sears and any Electrolux-branded product.
 
2014-01-07 01:56:29 PM  
My mother had three of the old style Electrolux vacuums that were inherited. Three because two were constantly in the shop. We never understood why they were considered "premium".

As to pricing, years ago I was reading an interview with a knock-off cassette maker think mamerix rather then memorex. The manufacture in HK said that he could duplicate and perhaps surpass their quality for an additional penny per unit, but his customers were not willing to pay that.

And on the racy advertising. "Nothing sucks like a vax" for the vax vacuums was fairly common in the mid 80's.
 
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