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(Curbed)   Purer-than-thou microhome owner slams other microhome owners for selling out, wanting to create McMansions on their tiny plot of land instead of cabins with beanbag walls, tin-can siding and used TJ's bag wallpaper   (curbed.com) divider line 160
    More: Stupid, McMansion, log cabins, mess  
•       •       •

13355 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jan 2014 at 7:50 PM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-05 09:03:01 PM  
...pinto bean sacks to construct the interior walls, Trader Joe's shopping bags as wall covering, and hammered tin cans from a local pizza shop for the exterior. Some of the more decorative details include a porch swing made from an old Dairy Queen bench, flower boxes made from old stove hoods...

Sounds like they would love living here:
withfriendship.com
God damn hipsters and their 'designer poverty'.
 
2014-01-05 09:03:30 PM  
So the 24 yo kid sleeps/lives in the loft like 5 feet from the bedroom. Where do these people fark? That ain't right. He's got balcony seats for his folk's rutting.
 
2014-01-05 09:05:35 PM  

Forbidden Doughnut: Elfich: [img.fark.net image 640x427]

Come on, those are to big.

I couldlive in one of these:


A <div> tag?
 
2014-01-05 09:08:53 PM  
I've lived in a small (not tiny, just small) house and it ain't all it's cracked up to be. Sure living in what's basically the Swiss Army knife of habitation seems nifty at first, but then you want companionship. Then decisions must be made concerning what can be sacrificed in lieu of companionship. God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.
 
2014-01-05 09:09:18 PM  

Rav Tokomi: ...pinto bean sacks to construct the interior walls, Trader Joe's shopping bags as wall covering, and hammered tin cans from a local pizza shop for the exterior. Some of the more decorative details include a porch swing made from an old Dairy Queen bench, flower boxes made from old stove hoods...

Sounds like they would love living here:
[withfriendship.com image 600x450]
God damn hipsters and their 'designer poverty'.


Yeah, but, they feel superior to you in ways you wouldn't know.  Plus, those houses are locally-sourced and artisanally crafted.
 
2014-01-05 09:10:06 PM  

Nick Nostril: So the 24 yo kid sleeps/lives in the loft like 5 feet from the bedroom. Where do these people fark? That ain't right. He's got balcony seats for his folk's rutting.


So does 90% of the world's population.
 
2014-01-05 09:14:12 PM  
Why does this idiot (or any of you idiots, for that matter) care so much about what other people are doing? Mind your own business. Leave people alone. Unsolicited life advice from obvious losers used to be amusing, now it's become annoying.
 
2014-01-05 09:16:29 PM  
The origonal microhouse
 
2014-01-05 09:17:23 PM  
More power to them, that kid/adult will be walking with a cane in 2 years.

It sounds like a good idea until someone farts.
 
2014-01-05 09:19:27 PM  

Danger Avoid Death: My niece had a house just like that.
[farm2.staticflickr.com image 450x450]
Of course, she was 5.


Pfft. My dad built me a playhouse twice that size when I was five. Out of wood. My dad was superior.
My house now is even bigger than that! AND made out of wood!

imagizer.imageshack.us
 
2014-01-05 09:19:49 PM  

Dwight_Yeast: Nick Nostril: So the 24 yo kid sleeps/lives in the loft like 5 feet from the bedroom. Where do these people fark? That ain't right. He's got balcony seats for his folk's rutting.

So does 90% of the world's population.


That would throw me off my game. The rest of the world is farked up.
 
2014-01-05 09:21:52 PM  

mikeray: More power to them, that kid/adult will be walking with a cane in 2 years.

It sounds like a good idea until someone farts.


Would be great to brag that you cleared out a whole house with one fart though.
 
2014-01-05 09:22:41 PM  
Dwight_Yeast:
And if you look at houses built right after WWII, due to materials shortages, 900 square feet was considered an excellent starter home and many houses were designed for families of four which were only 1500 sq ft.

We live in a 1000 sq ft postwar home and it's an ok starter size even now.  Of course, unlike the 50's, an industrial worker with a stay-at-home spouse could barely afford it now.  And once we have two children of an age where privacy becomes a factor we will have to move (assuming anyone still has a job by then).

MutantMotherMouse:
God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.

I've seen condos barely larger than these micro houses... if you want to throw a party there's a party room in the building.  No good for a dinner party though, unless you order in.
 
2014-01-05 09:23:00 PM  
DrPainMD: Mind your own business. Leave people alone. Unsolicited life advice from obvious losers used to be amusing, now it's become annoying.

Posting on the internet. This is deliciously absurd.
 
2014-01-05 09:28:42 PM  

ultraholland: Hobbits prefer rounded homes that are built into hillsides, but some have taken to living like the big folk.


saveordie.info

Lived in a hole in the ground before it was popular.
 
2014-01-05 09:36:10 PM  

MutantMotherMouse: God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.


Uh....Uh, a what? Are you talking, like, I'd have to buy some plates and stuff?
 
2014-01-05 09:38:03 PM  

Nick Nostril: mikeray: More power to them, that kid/adult will be walking with a cane in 2 years.

It sounds like a good idea until someone farts.

Would be great to brag that you cleared out a whole house with one fart though.


What makes you think I can't do that now?
 
2014-01-05 09:46:09 PM  

cryinoutloud: MutantMotherMouse: God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.

Uh....Uh, a what? Are you talking, like, I'd have to buy some plates and stuff?


Only small ones.
 
2014-01-05 09:57:18 PM  
Anything under 1000 square feet is illegal in my 'hood.
 
2014-01-05 10:00:30 PM  

chimp_ninja: lysdexic: I dunno. I think a lot of folks are doing it because of the cool factor. "My carbon footprint is smaller than yours, nyah!"

Their particular eccentricity seems harmless, however.  It's not for everyone, but it's a weird thing to be upset about.

There are plenty of other neighbors in the world with unusual hobbies that create lots of waste, noise, odors, etc.  I'd rather live next to Mr. Paper Bag Microhouse than some guy who spends his life working on his motorcycle.


I know people who've grown up in tin shacks, and the show-offy aspect is what turned me off. Like I said, I had the video on mute. I was probably already going to hate it.

I don't know if I'd want either neighbor, but I'm a country girl. It would depend on the fire hazard likeliness.

Rav Tokomi: God damn hipsters and their 'designer poverty'.


Yeah, pretty much this.

Somewhat related: Not often does the Daily Fail have a better article, but there you are. The family lives in a set of two houses.
 
2014-01-05 10:06:13 PM  
I'm trying really, really hard not to hate these people, but do they really think anyone besides young people starting out, and maybe older couples that have all the kids gone and no desire to ever have them visit want to live in these micro homes?  And really, they are glorified smaller trailer homes, which these days can be quite nice.

The answer to the idiotic 3000 sqft McMansion squeezed onto a 4000sqft lot is not a 300-400sqft shack.

Maybe for those not wanting an apartment, a 1000sq ft homes or going back towards two story homes in a smaller foot print but making up for that by having two stories is the answer for denser urban development?
 
2014-01-05 10:09:13 PM  
Ugh. I love the tiny home/small cabin thing.. but I hate anyone who thinks of themselves as a purist and acts snotty when people take a good idea and adapt it to better suit their needs.
 
2014-01-05 10:19:18 PM  
Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
worldcarslist.com
 
2014-01-05 10:23:17 PM  
The 2nd guest comment on that site... Nice
 
2014-01-05 10:28:50 PM  
Smeggy Smurf: The origional microhouse

there's also the added bonus of being able to open up an in-home candy store.
 
2014-01-05 10:42:48 PM  
Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.
 
2014-01-05 10:49:04 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
[worldcarslist.com image 500x358]


Is it by the river?
 
2014-01-05 10:50:55 PM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.



Cooking?
 
2014-01-05 10:55:00 PM  

yakmans_dad: I do genealogy, and the combination of online census data and Google Street View lets me easily see the houses my ancestors lived in. Sometimes, there were 9 people in a shotgun (or camelback[1]) house. Several of them adult children of the parent units. I can't imagine my family was very distinctive in that regard.

Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,


The house the wife and I are renting is a circa-1900 laborer's cottage, remodeled. It's tiny, but I guess it was sufficient for the time. I'd estimate the footprint of the house to be about 650-700 square feet, minus the interior walls. It's like living on a boat, every object has its specific place or else it all goes to hell fast. A bargain at only $1400 per month, water included!

/I know
 
2014-01-05 10:55:18 PM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.
 
2014-01-05 10:57:27 PM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


One wicked wok post deserves another.

www.signspotting.com
 
2014-01-05 11:00:17 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.


Huh. I'd never heard of those. You'd get some hella wrist muscles trying to do the flippy thing, though.
 
2014-01-05 11:01:19 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.


Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.
 
2014-01-05 11:04:47 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
[worldcarslist.com image 500x358]


No No No.  This is the original microhouse:

encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2014-01-05 11:11:08 PM  

Snarfangel: RoomFullOfMonkeys: I think I'm going to build one of these. I've got plenty of space for it in my livingroom.


Do it in Lego.  I love those things


Lincoln Logs, baby. Build it with Lincoln Logs.
 
2014-01-05 11:14:28 PM  

Odoriferous Queef: Smeggy Smurf: Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
[worldcarslist.com image 500x358]

No No No.  This is the original microhouse:

[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 259x194]


You don't rape on the bus.  You rape in the house
 
2014-01-05 11:20:05 PM  
As soon as I can get warp drive installed on a Futuro, I'm outta here!
 
2014-01-05 11:29:40 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.


No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

Also note that using a cast-iron wok does not somehow make up for a stove with insufficient thermal output; using a thin wok you will get just the same heat. The only point of cast iron is, as you note, that it takes longer to cool down, but if you're cooking enough to cool down the wok then you're trying to cook too much at once.

Go live in China and watch how locals use woks. I did. It will prove enlightening.

ArcadianRefugee: Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.


Aww, how cute. You're mocking others when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

Want proof? Go to China -- where you will find many people cooking on single, portable electric hot plates or small disposable gas canisters -- and find me the cast-iron woks they'll all be using, if your theory of wok usage is correct.

Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat-soaking it. In fact, I've never seen them in Europe, either (although it's been over a decade since I last was there for more than a couple of weeks at a time, admittedly) -- it seems only to be America where cooks have so little knowledge of what constitutes Chinese food that they believe a cast-iron wok to be serviceable.

In fairness to you, that's because chinese-american food was heavily tailored to US tastes in the early days, so you now expect over-seasoned, over-oily dishes that emphasize the sauces above all else, rather than what true Chinese food is -- something that emphasizes the natural flavors of the ingredients. All your General Tso's chickens and Chop Sueys couldn't be much further from real Chinese food, and nor could all the other nightmare buffet fare.

And even dishes that do exist in China (albeit, more to cater for foreigners) such as sweet and sour pork bear little resemblance to their actual equivalents. Here it is served with a thick batter, almost a doughy bread coating, and then a watery, thin, relatively flavorless sauce is served on the side. There, it is very lightly battered, crispy, and served coated in an extremely thick, sticky and flavorful sauce (one of the few real, common Chinese dishes where the sauce itself is the dominant flavor.)

So it's not surprising Americans know nothing about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.
 
2014-01-05 11:35:42 PM  
DNRTFA - are they long haired friends of Jeebus? And are they chartreuse?

/ the micro homes, not the people
 
2014-01-05 11:39:19 PM  

digitalrain: DNRTFA - are they long haired friends of Jeebus? And are they chartreuse?

/ the micro homes, not the people


Are the micro homes long-haired friends of Jeebus? Not that I noticed, but I wasn't watching too closely.
 
2014-01-05 11:46:52 PM  
These people were annoying, for sure, but as far as hating on them...I don't get it. I would live in a tiny house, if I could. I just wouldn't be smug about it.
 
2014-01-05 11:47:41 PM  
I just realized my comment smacks of smuggery. Totally unintended. And ironic, I think.
 
2014-01-05 11:48:02 PM  

gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

Also note that using a cast-iron wok does not somehow make up for a stove with insufficient thermal output; using a thin wok you will get just the same heat. The only point of cast iron is, as you note, that it takes longer to cool down, but if you're cooking enough to cool down the wok then you're trying to cook too much at once.

Go live in China and watch how locals use woks. I did. It will prove enlightening.

ArcadianRefugee: Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.

Aww, how cute. You're mocking others when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

Want proof? Go to China -- where you will find many people cooking on single, portable electric hot plates or small disposable gas canisters -- and find me the cast-iron woks they'll all be using, if your theory of wok usage is correct.

Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat-soaking it. In fact, I've never seen them in Europe, either (although it's been over a decade since I last was there for more than a couple of weeks at a time, admittedly) -- it seems only to be America where cooks have so little knowledge of what constitutes Chinese food that they believe a cast-iron wok to be serviceable.

In fairness to you, that's because chinese-american food was heavily tailored to US tastes in the early days, so you now expect over-seasoned, over-oily dishes that emphasize the sauces above all else, rather than what true Chinese food is -- something that emphasizes the natural flavors of the ingredients. All your General Tso's chickens and Chop Sueys couldn't be much further from real Chinese food, and nor could all the other nightmare buffet fare.

And even dishes that do exist in China (albeit, more to cater for foreigners) such as sweet and sour pork bear little resemblance to their actual equivalents. Here it is served with a thick batter, almost a doughy bread coating, and then a watery, thin, relatively flavorless sauce is served on the side. There, it is very lightly battered, crispy, and served coated in an extremely thick, sticky and flavorful sauce (one of the few real, common Chinese dishes where the sauce itself is the dominant flavor.)

So it's not surprising Americans know nothing about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.


And you a prime example of an American who knows about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.
 
2014-01-05 11:48:25 PM  

iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...


This what you have in mind?

i40.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-05 11:56:03 PM  

vudukungfu: sprgrss: Very fitting that their 24 year old son still lives at home.

What a weird family.

He hasn't gotten the hint yet, poor snowflake.


Be more direct

i41.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-06 12:00:00 AM  

Snarfangel: I just want people from other states to realized that we have settled hipsters from all over the country in Portland, thus ceding a portion of our beautiful state for the betterment of the rest of the nation.

You're welcome.


Thank you
 
2014-01-06 12:00:09 AM  

max_pooper: gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

Also note that using a cast-iron wok does not somehow make up for a stove with insufficient thermal output; using a thin wok you will get just the same heat. The only point of cast iron is, as you note, that it takes longer to cool down, but if you're cooking enough to cool down the wok then you're trying to cook too much at once.

Go live in China and watch how locals use woks. I did. It will prove enlightening.

ArcadianRefugee: Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.

Aww, how cute. You're mocking others when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

Want proof? Go to China -- where you will find many people cooking on single, portable electric hot plates or small disposable gas canisters -- and find me the cast-iron woks they'll all be using, if your theory of wok usage is correct.

Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat- ...


I have watched Yao Ming shoot free throws so if you guys have a question about Chinese culture just ask me.
 
2014-01-06 12:02:34 AM  

mjjt: iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...

This what you have in mind?

[i40.tinypic.com image 818x1152]


That's very cool looking, what is it?
 
2014-01-06 12:03:57 AM  

max_pooper: And you a prime example of an American who knows about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large


I'm not entirely sure, given the appalling grammar, what exactly you're trying to say. However, let me try:

* I'm not American. (I do now live in the United States, however.)
* I've spent more than half of my life living in Asia, and my family has spent over half a century living in Asia (or collectively, probably a couple of centuries between us, just for my immediate family)
* We mostly dined at restaurants (large and small) that the typical foreigner wouldn't know about or would shun altogether, even foreigners who'd been living there for some time. It was relatively rare to see other gweilos in the places where we dined. And we dined out regularly, at least a couple of times a week for the two decades and change that I lived there.
* I enjoy cooking Asian (and especially Chinese) food myself, and do so from authentic recipes in Asian cookbooks (Taiwanese, mostly) as well as from translated Asian blogs. My family (and especially my parents) likewise enjoy cooking Asian food.
* I travel to Asia regularly, and will next be there in less than 90 days
* I've tried Chinese / Chinese American food in the US both in major cities with Chinatowns (San Francisco: 7/10, Chicago 6/10, New York 7.5/10, Atlanta surprisingly 8/10) and in large / small chain and mom-and-pop restaurants in small towns in quite a few states.

So yes, I believe I know of what I speak.
 
2014-01-06 12:05:43 AM  

gweilo8888: max_pooper: And you a prime example of an American who knows about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large

I'm not entirely sure, given the appalling grammar, what exactly you're trying to say. However, let me try:

* I'm not American. (I do now live in the United States, however.)
* I've spent more than half of my life living in Asia, and my family has spent over half a century living in Asia (or collectively, probably a couple of centuries between us, just for my immediate family)
* We mostly dined at restaurants (large and small) that the typical foreigner wouldn't know about or would shun altogether, even foreigners who'd been living there for some time. It was relatively rare to see other gweilos in the places where we dined. And we dined out regularly, at least a couple of times a week for the two decades and change that I lived there.
* I enjoy cooking Asian (and especially Chinese) food myself, and do so from authentic recipes in Asian cookbooks (Taiwanese, mostly) as well as from translated Asian blogs. My family (and especially my parents) likewise enjoy cooking Asian food.
* I travel to Asia regularly, and will next be there in less than 90 days
* I've tried Chinese / Chinese American food in the US both in major cities with Chinatowns (San Francisco: 7/10, Chicago 6/10, New York 7.5/10, Atlanta surprisingly 8/10) and in large / small chain and mom-and-pop restaurants in small towns in quite a few states.

So yes, I believe I know of what I speak.


You may think you do, but you don't.
 
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