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(Curbed)   Purer-than-thou microhome owner slams other microhome owners for selling out, wanting to create McMansions on their tiny plot of land instead of cabins with beanbag walls, tin-can siding and used TJ's bag wallpaper   (curbed.com ) divider line
    More: Stupid, McMansion, log cabins, mess  
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13385 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jan 2014 at 7:50 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-05 05:54:48 PM  
i.imgur.com
Ha! Hipsters live in tiny houses for babies!
 
2014-01-05 06:20:52 PM  
Very fitting that their 24 year old son still lives at home.

What a weird family.
 
2014-01-05 06:23:40 PM  
I plan to do this as soon as my youngest graduates high school. Though I won't be using the sauce cans and trash bags.
 
2014-01-05 06:33:15 PM  
There are none more zealous than the recently converted.
 
2014-01-05 06:38:45 PM  
I kept reading that as "microphone owner".
 
2014-01-05 06:42:02 PM  
I'll give them that it's pretty cute looking.  Not something I'd enjoy, but hey, it's their house, glad they like it.
 
2014-01-05 07:05:27 PM  
So how fast will that tenderbox go once there is a spark?

The kid is 24 and has joint problems and is working bent over?  Good luck with that.
 
2014-01-05 07:22:17 PM  

DON.MAC: So how fast will that tenderbox go once there is a spark?


It depends on if she likes you. Most women decide if they're gonna f*ck a guy within 10 seconds of meeting them.
 
2014-01-05 07:45:39 PM  
I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.
 
2014-01-05 07:50:29 PM  
Maybe it comes from growing up in the woods of Maine where almost everyone used a wood stove for additional heat, but houses built from these materials seem highly combustible and unsafe.
 
2014-01-05 07:56:39 PM  
I just want people from other states to realized that we have settled hipsters from all over the country in Portland, thus ceding a portion of our beautiful state for the betterment of the rest of the nation.

You're welcome.
 
2014-01-05 07:57:03 PM  
Of course it's Portland.
 
2014-01-05 07:57:29 PM  
Where's the MJ hydroponics room?  Mushroom garden?
 
2014-01-05 07:58:51 PM  
I think I'm going to build one of these. I've got plenty of space for it in my livingroom.
 
2014-01-05 07:59:20 PM  
fc08.deviantart.net
 
2014-01-05 07:59:56 PM  
dafuq did I just kinda read?
 
2014-01-05 08:00:11 PM  

RoomFullOfMonkeys: I think I'm going to build one of these. I've got plenty of space for it in my livingroom.



Do it in Lego.  I love those things
 
2014-01-05 08:00:42 PM  
I didn't get much of a purer-than-thou vibe from the video but assume away Subberz. Haters gotta hate.
 
2014-01-05 08:01:24 PM  
Seems like it'd be cold as all hell in the winter, with the added bonus of making sure you're f*cked in case of more than a day or two of bad weather.
 
2014-01-05 08:02:50 PM  

Molavian: Seems like it'd be cold as all hell in the winter, with the added bonus of making sure you're f*cked in case of more than a day or two of bad weather.



They would have noticed that, but they moved in before it was cool.
 
2014-01-05 08:07:22 PM  

Snarfangel: Molavian: Seems like it'd be cold as all hell in the winter, with the added bonus of making sure you're f*cked in case of more than a day or two of bad weather.


They would have noticed that, but they moved in before it was cool.


Maybe they'll die in an ironic manner.  That would be nice.
 
2014-01-05 08:09:38 PM  
i1.ytimg.com
This is NOT awesome
 
2014-01-05 08:09:47 PM  

Snarfangel: Molavian: Seems like it'd be cold as all hell in the winter, with the added bonus of making sure you're f*cked in case of more than a day or two of bad weather.


They would have noticed that, but they moved in before it was cool.


very nice
 
2014-01-05 08:12:15 PM  
I do genealogy, and the combination of online census data and Google Street View lets me easily see the houses my ancestors lived in. Sometimes, there were 9 people in a shotgun (or camelback[1]) house. Several of them adult children of the parent units. I can't imagine my family was very distinctive in that regard.

Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,

[1] A camelback is like a shotgun except with a 2nd story room at the rear of the property.
 
2014-01-05 08:13:17 PM  

propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.


Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...
 
2014-01-05 08:16:17 PM  
This is all about creativity and originality?

Funny, I thought it was all about having a tiny home that didn't cost much money and ran efficiently.

Where are my priorities?
 
2014-01-05 08:17:03 PM  
That would be just fine for one person but three? Eff that.
 
2014-01-05 08:19:05 PM  

yakmans_dad: I do genealogy, and the combination of online census data and Google Street View lets me easily see the houses my ancestors lived in. Sometimes, there were 9 people in a shotgun (or camelback[1]) house. Several of them adult children of the parent units. I can't imagine my family was very distinctive in that regard.

Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,

[1] A camelback is like a shotgun except with a 2nd story room at the rear of the property.


cdn.freshome.com
 
2014-01-05 08:20:23 PM  
Hobbits prefer rounded homes that are built into hillsides, but some have taken to living like the big folk.
 
2014-01-05 08:23:21 PM  
c0263062.cdn.cloudfiles.rackspacecloud.com
 
2014-01-05 08:25:54 PM  
I could only take about two minutes of that video, and I had it on mute. I remember listening to an NPR report on Portlandia, which was funny. What I didn't realize was that they then started a segment on some hipster coffee company that did deliveries on some bike that they'd built. I thought they were still talking about the show.

yakmans_dad:
Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,


I dunno. I think a lot of folks are doing it because of the cool factor. "My carbon footprint is smaller than yours, nyah!"
 
2014-01-05 08:26:33 PM  
I am actually looking into something like this for an office/guest house. Most of the microhouses I've seen look like mobile homes with better exteriors. This actually does look like a guest cottage.
 
2014-01-05 08:26:34 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: yakmans_dad: I do genealogy, and the combination of online census data and Google Street View lets me easily see the houses my ancestors lived in. Sometimes, there were 9 people in a shotgun (or camelback[1]) house. Several of them adult children of the parent units. I can't imagine my family was very distinctive in that regard.

Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,

[1] A camelback is like a shotgun except with a 2nd story room at the rear of the property.

[cdn.freshome.com image 550x367]


http://leoweekly.com/news-/-features/southern-standard-a-loving-defe ns e-shotgun-house
 
2014-01-05 08:27:47 PM  

Molavian: Seems like it'd be cold as all hell in the winter, with the added bonus of making sure you're f*cked in case of more than a day or two of bad weather.


But at that size it wouldn't take much to heat it.  Unless it leaks air like a sieve.

Also, the logo for the website made me think it was Cur Bed.  Like where a mongrel would sleep.
 
2014-01-05 08:28:24 PM  

lysdexic: I could only take about two minutes of that video, and I had it on mute. I remember listening to an NPR report on Portlandia, which was funny. What I didn't realize was that they then started a segment on some hipster coffee company that did deliveries on some bike that they'd built. I thought they were still talking about the show.

yakmans_dad:
Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,


I dunno. I think a lot of folks are doing it because of the cool factor. "My carbon footprint is smaller than yours, nyah!"


There's a saying: people always buy as much house as they can afford.

Few people give up space for cool.
 
2014-01-05 08:29:47 PM  
How about a nice NYC studio
www.theblaze.com
 
2014-01-05 08:30:23 PM  

sprgrss: Very fitting that their 24 year old son still lives at home.


Doesn't everyone live at home?
 
2014-01-05 08:31:17 PM  
Actually, I've done the paper bag as wall covering thing before.

With the paper torn properly and covered with polyurethane, it looks kind of like you've covered your walls with leather.  It's a cool effect.

It wouldn't work in my current house.
 
2014-01-05 08:34:58 PM  
img.fark.net

Come on, those are to big.
 
2014-01-05 08:35:35 PM  

lysdexic: I dunno. I think a lot of folks are doing it because of the cool factor. "My carbon footprint is smaller than yours, nyah!"


Their particular eccentricity seems harmless, however.  It's not for everyone, but it's a weird thing to be upset about.

There are plenty of other neighbors in the world with unusual hobbies that create lots of waste, noise, odors, etc.  I'd rather live next to Mr. Paper Bag Microhouse than some guy who spends his life working on his motorcycle.
 
2014-01-05 08:45:02 PM  
That was great and all, but I'll keep my 3500 ft2 mid-century modern.
 
2014-01-05 08:48:24 PM  

sprgrss: Very fitting that their 24 year old son still lives at home.

What a weird family.


He hasn't gotten the hint yet, poor snowflake.
 
2014-01-05 08:49:41 PM  
They're all made out of ticky-tacky. And they all look just the same.
 
2014-01-05 08:49:58 PM  

yakmans_dad: I do genealogy, and the combination of online census data and Google Street View lets me easily see the houses my ancestors lived in. Sometimes, there were 9 people in a shotgun (or camelback[1]) house. Several of them adult children of the parent units. I can't imagine my family was very distinctive in that regard.

Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,


I've looked at the census records for my part of South Philadelphia and every family was at least six people.  Often there were many more in a three-bedroom house where the third bedroom would now barely pass as a walk-in closet.  Anyone who had an extra room had a lodger or lodgers, often from the same village in Italy the family was from. (it's one of the reason cities like Philly have seen a massive drop in population: houses which held a dozen people in 1920 now only have one or two residents).

And if you look at houses built right after WWII, due to materials shortages, 900 square feet was considered an excellent starter home and many houses were designed for families of four which were only 1500 sq ft.
 
2014-01-05 08:50:08 PM  
I love the small house but would need it in the middle of 10 acres.

Her voice made me want to kick my cat.
 
2014-01-05 08:52:23 PM  

radarlove: This is all about creativity and originality?

Funny, I thought it was all about having a tiny home that didn't cost much money and ran efficiently.

Where are my priorities?


Clearly, you also have to make it resemble something out of a shantytown without it actually being something out of a shantytown.

That's what the aluminum can siding made me think of, anyway.

I mean, good on them from repurposing discarded materials. But did they have to leave it looking like garbage? If they can afford wine, they can probably afford paint.
 
2014-01-05 08:53:09 PM  

Tyrosine: That was great and all, but I'll keep my 3500 ft2 mid-century modern.


this...the smallest room in my house including bathrooms is bigger than that.
 
2014-01-05 08:56:45 PM  

Elfich: [img.fark.net image 640x427]

Come on, those are to big.


I couldlive in one of these:
 
2014-01-05 08:59:17 PM  

vudukungfu: sprgrss: Very fitting that their 24 year old son still lives at home.

What a weird family.

He hasn't gotten the hint yet, poor snowflake.


You think he would have when they had him live in a frickin tree house for a year.
 
2014-01-05 08:59:30 PM  
My niece had a house just like that.

farm2.staticflickr.com

Of course, she was 5.
 
2014-01-05 09:03:01 PM  
...pinto bean sacks to construct the interior walls, Trader Joe's shopping bags as wall covering, and hammered tin cans from a local pizza shop for the exterior. Some of the more decorative details include a porch swing made from an old Dairy Queen bench, flower boxes made from old stove hoods...

Sounds like they would love living here:
withfriendship.com
God damn hipsters and their 'designer poverty'.
 
2014-01-05 09:03:30 PM  
So the 24 yo kid sleeps/lives in the loft like 5 feet from the bedroom. Where do these people fark? That ain't right. He's got balcony seats for his folk's rutting.
 
2014-01-05 09:05:35 PM  

Forbidden Doughnut: Elfich: [img.fark.net image 640x427]

Come on, those are to big.

I couldlive in one of these:


A <div> tag?
 
2014-01-05 09:08:53 PM  
I've lived in a small (not tiny, just small) house and it ain't all it's cracked up to be. Sure living in what's basically the Swiss Army knife of habitation seems nifty at first, but then you want companionship. Then decisions must be made concerning what can be sacrificed in lieu of companionship. God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.
 
2014-01-05 09:09:18 PM  

Rav Tokomi: ...pinto bean sacks to construct the interior walls, Trader Joe's shopping bags as wall covering, and hammered tin cans from a local pizza shop for the exterior. Some of the more decorative details include a porch swing made from an old Dairy Queen bench, flower boxes made from old stove hoods...

Sounds like they would love living here:
[withfriendship.com image 600x450]
God damn hipsters and their 'designer poverty'.


Yeah, but, they feel superior to you in ways you wouldn't know.  Plus, those houses are locally-sourced and artisanally crafted.
 
2014-01-05 09:10:06 PM  

Nick Nostril: So the 24 yo kid sleeps/lives in the loft like 5 feet from the bedroom. Where do these people fark? That ain't right. He's got balcony seats for his folk's rutting.


So does 90% of the world's population.
 
2014-01-05 09:14:12 PM  
Why does this idiot (or any of you idiots, for that matter) care so much about what other people are doing? Mind your own business. Leave people alone. Unsolicited life advice from obvious losers used to be amusing, now it's become annoying.
 
2014-01-05 09:16:29 PM  
The origonal microhouse
 
2014-01-05 09:17:23 PM  
More power to them, that kid/adult will be walking with a cane in 2 years.

It sounds like a good idea until someone farts.
 
2014-01-05 09:19:27 PM  

Danger Avoid Death: My niece had a house just like that.
[farm2.staticflickr.com image 450x450]
Of course, she was 5.


Pfft. My dad built me a playhouse twice that size when I was five. Out of wood. My dad was superior.
My house now is even bigger than that! AND made out of wood!

imagizer.imageshack.us
 
2014-01-05 09:19:49 PM  

Dwight_Yeast: Nick Nostril: So the 24 yo kid sleeps/lives in the loft like 5 feet from the bedroom. Where do these people fark? That ain't right. He's got balcony seats for his folk's rutting.

So does 90% of the world's population.


That would throw me off my game. The rest of the world is farked up.
 
2014-01-05 09:21:52 PM  

mikeray: More power to them, that kid/adult will be walking with a cane in 2 years.

It sounds like a good idea until someone farts.


Would be great to brag that you cleared out a whole house with one fart though.
 
2014-01-05 09:22:41 PM  
Dwight_Yeast:
And if you look at houses built right after WWII, due to materials shortages, 900 square feet was considered an excellent starter home and many houses were designed for families of four which were only 1500 sq ft.

We live in a 1000 sq ft postwar home and it's an ok starter size even now.  Of course, unlike the 50's, an industrial worker with a stay-at-home spouse could barely afford it now.  And once we have two children of an age where privacy becomes a factor we will have to move (assuming anyone still has a job by then).

MutantMotherMouse:
God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.

I've seen condos barely larger than these micro houses... if you want to throw a party there's a party room in the building.  No good for a dinner party though, unless you order in.
 
2014-01-05 09:23:00 PM  
DrPainMD: Mind your own business. Leave people alone. Unsolicited life advice from obvious losers used to be amusing, now it's become annoying.

Posting on the internet. This is deliciously absurd.
 
2014-01-05 09:28:42 PM  

ultraholland: Hobbits prefer rounded homes that are built into hillsides, but some have taken to living like the big folk.


saveordie.info

Lived in a hole in the ground before it was popular.
 
2014-01-05 09:36:10 PM  

MutantMotherMouse: God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.


Uh....Uh, a what? Are you talking, like, I'd have to buy some plates and stuff?
 
2014-01-05 09:38:03 PM  

Nick Nostril: mikeray: More power to them, that kid/adult will be walking with a cane in 2 years.

It sounds like a good idea until someone farts.

Would be great to brag that you cleared out a whole house with one fart though.


What makes you think I can't do that now?
 
2014-01-05 09:46:09 PM  

cryinoutloud: MutantMotherMouse: God forbid you consider a small dinner party. Not happening.

Uh....Uh, a what? Are you talking, like, I'd have to buy some plates and stuff?


Only small ones.
 
2014-01-05 09:57:18 PM  
Anything under 1000 square feet is illegal in my 'hood.
 
2014-01-05 10:00:30 PM  

chimp_ninja: lysdexic: I dunno. I think a lot of folks are doing it because of the cool factor. "My carbon footprint is smaller than yours, nyah!"

Their particular eccentricity seems harmless, however.  It's not for everyone, but it's a weird thing to be upset about.

There are plenty of other neighbors in the world with unusual hobbies that create lots of waste, noise, odors, etc.  I'd rather live next to Mr. Paper Bag Microhouse than some guy who spends his life working on his motorcycle.


I know people who've grown up in tin shacks, and the show-offy aspect is what turned me off. Like I said, I had the video on mute. I was probably already going to hate it.

I don't know if I'd want either neighbor, but I'm a country girl. It would depend on the fire hazard likeliness.

Rav Tokomi: God damn hipsters and their 'designer poverty'.


Yeah, pretty much this.

Somewhat related: Not often does the Daily Fail have a better article, but there you are. The family lives in a set of two houses.
 
2014-01-05 10:06:13 PM  
I'm trying really, really hard not to hate these people, but do they really think anyone besides young people starting out, and maybe older couples that have all the kids gone and no desire to ever have them visit want to live in these micro homes?  And really, they are glorified smaller trailer homes, which these days can be quite nice.

The answer to the idiotic 3000 sqft McMansion squeezed onto a 4000sqft lot is not a 300-400sqft shack.

Maybe for those not wanting an apartment, a 1000sq ft homes or going back towards two story homes in a smaller foot print but making up for that by having two stories is the answer for denser urban development?
 
2014-01-05 10:09:13 PM  
Ugh. I love the tiny home/small cabin thing.. but I hate anyone who thinks of themselves as a purist and acts snotty when people take a good idea and adapt it to better suit their needs.
 
2014-01-05 10:19:18 PM  
Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
worldcarslist.com
 
2014-01-05 10:23:17 PM  
The 2nd guest comment on that site... Nice
 
2014-01-05 10:28:50 PM  
Smeggy Smurf: The origional microhouse

there's also the added bonus of being able to open up an in-home candy store.
 
2014-01-05 10:42:48 PM  
Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.
 
2014-01-05 10:49:04 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
[worldcarslist.com image 500x358]


Is it by the river?
 
2014-01-05 10:50:55 PM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.



Cooking?
 
2014-01-05 10:55:00 PM  

yakmans_dad: I do genealogy, and the combination of online census data and Google Street View lets me easily see the houses my ancestors lived in. Sometimes, there were 9 people in a shotgun (or camelback[1]) house. Several of them adult children of the parent units. I can't imagine my family was very distinctive in that regard.

Microhouses only reflects the fact that we've regressed from the economic forces we emerged with following WW2,


The house the wife and I are renting is a circa-1900 laborer's cottage, remodeled. It's tiny, but I guess it was sufficient for the time. I'd estimate the footprint of the house to be about 650-700 square feet, minus the interior walls. It's like living on a boat, every object has its specific place or else it all goes to hell fast. A bargain at only $1400 per month, water included!

/I know
 
2014-01-05 10:55:18 PM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.
 
2014-01-05 10:57:27 PM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


One wicked wok post deserves another.

www.signspotting.com
 
2014-01-05 11:00:17 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.


Huh. I'd never heard of those. You'd get some hella wrist muscles trying to do the flippy thing, though.
 
2014-01-05 11:01:19 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.


Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.
 
2014-01-05 11:04:47 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
[worldcarslist.com image 500x358]


No No No.  This is the original microhouse:

encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2014-01-05 11:11:08 PM  

Snarfangel: RoomFullOfMonkeys: I think I'm going to build one of these. I've got plenty of space for it in my livingroom.


Do it in Lego.  I love those things


Lincoln Logs, baby. Build it with Lincoln Logs.
 
2014-01-05 11:14:28 PM  

Odoriferous Queef: Smeggy Smurf: Let's try that again.

The origional microhouse
[worldcarslist.com image 500x358]

No No No.  This is the original microhouse:

[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 259x194]


You don't rape on the bus.  You rape in the house
 
2014-01-05 11:20:05 PM  
As soon as I can get warp drive installed on a Futuro, I'm outta here!
 
2014-01-05 11:29:40 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.


No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

Also note that using a cast-iron wok does not somehow make up for a stove with insufficient thermal output; using a thin wok you will get just the same heat. The only point of cast iron is, as you note, that it takes longer to cool down, but if you're cooking enough to cool down the wok then you're trying to cook too much at once.

Go live in China and watch how locals use woks. I did. It will prove enlightening.

ArcadianRefugee: Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.


Aww, how cute. You're mocking others when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

Want proof? Go to China -- where you will find many people cooking on single, portable electric hot plates or small disposable gas canisters -- and find me the cast-iron woks they'll all be using, if your theory of wok usage is correct.

Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat-soaking it. In fact, I've never seen them in Europe, either (although it's been over a decade since I last was there for more than a couple of weeks at a time, admittedly) -- it seems only to be America where cooks have so little knowledge of what constitutes Chinese food that they believe a cast-iron wok to be serviceable.

In fairness to you, that's because chinese-american food was heavily tailored to US tastes in the early days, so you now expect over-seasoned, over-oily dishes that emphasize the sauces above all else, rather than what true Chinese food is -- something that emphasizes the natural flavors of the ingredients. All your General Tso's chickens and Chop Sueys couldn't be much further from real Chinese food, and nor could all the other nightmare buffet fare.

And even dishes that do exist in China (albeit, more to cater for foreigners) such as sweet and sour pork bear little resemblance to their actual equivalents. Here it is served with a thick batter, almost a doughy bread coating, and then a watery, thin, relatively flavorless sauce is served on the side. There, it is very lightly battered, crispy, and served coated in an extremely thick, sticky and flavorful sauce (one of the few real, common Chinese dishes where the sauce itself is the dominant flavor.)

So it's not surprising Americans know nothing about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.
 
2014-01-05 11:35:42 PM  
DNRTFA - are they long haired friends of Jeebus? And are they chartreuse?

/ the micro homes, not the people
 
2014-01-05 11:39:19 PM  

digitalrain: DNRTFA - are they long haired friends of Jeebus? And are they chartreuse?

/ the micro homes, not the people


Are the micro homes long-haired friends of Jeebus? Not that I noticed, but I wasn't watching too closely.
 
2014-01-05 11:46:52 PM  
These people were annoying, for sure, but as far as hating on them...I don't get it. I would live in a tiny house, if I could. I just wouldn't be smug about it.
 
2014-01-05 11:47:41 PM  
I just realized my comment smacks of smuggery. Totally unintended. And ironic, I think.
 
2014-01-05 11:48:02 PM  

gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

Also note that using a cast-iron wok does not somehow make up for a stove with insufficient thermal output; using a thin wok you will get just the same heat. The only point of cast iron is, as you note, that it takes longer to cool down, but if you're cooking enough to cool down the wok then you're trying to cook too much at once.

Go live in China and watch how locals use woks. I did. It will prove enlightening.

ArcadianRefugee: Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.

Aww, how cute. You're mocking others when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

Want proof? Go to China -- where you will find many people cooking on single, portable electric hot plates or small disposable gas canisters -- and find me the cast-iron woks they'll all be using, if your theory of wok usage is correct.

Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat-soaking it. In fact, I've never seen them in Europe, either (although it's been over a decade since I last was there for more than a couple of weeks at a time, admittedly) -- it seems only to be America where cooks have so little knowledge of what constitutes Chinese food that they believe a cast-iron wok to be serviceable.

In fairness to you, that's because chinese-american food was heavily tailored to US tastes in the early days, so you now expect over-seasoned, over-oily dishes that emphasize the sauces above all else, rather than what true Chinese food is -- something that emphasizes the natural flavors of the ingredients. All your General Tso's chickens and Chop Sueys couldn't be much further from real Chinese food, and nor could all the other nightmare buffet fare.

And even dishes that do exist in China (albeit, more to cater for foreigners) such as sweet and sour pork bear little resemblance to their actual equivalents. Here it is served with a thick batter, almost a doughy bread coating, and then a watery, thin, relatively flavorless sauce is served on the side. There, it is very lightly battered, crispy, and served coated in an extremely thick, sticky and flavorful sauce (one of the few real, common Chinese dishes where the sauce itself is the dominant flavor.)

So it's not surprising Americans know nothing about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.


And you a prime example of an American who knows about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.
 
2014-01-05 11:48:25 PM  

iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...


This what you have in mind?

i40.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-05 11:56:03 PM  

vudukungfu: sprgrss: Very fitting that their 24 year old son still lives at home.

What a weird family.

He hasn't gotten the hint yet, poor snowflake.


Be more direct

i41.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-06 12:00:00 AM  

Snarfangel: I just want people from other states to realized that we have settled hipsters from all over the country in Portland, thus ceding a portion of our beautiful state for the betterment of the rest of the nation.

You're welcome.


Thank you
 
2014-01-06 12:00:09 AM  

max_pooper: gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

Also note that using a cast-iron wok does not somehow make up for a stove with insufficient thermal output; using a thin wok you will get just the same heat. The only point of cast iron is, as you note, that it takes longer to cool down, but if you're cooking enough to cool down the wok then you're trying to cook too much at once.

Go live in China and watch how locals use woks. I did. It will prove enlightening.

ArcadianRefugee: Shhhh. He thinks he knows something. Just let him have this one.

Aww, how cute. You're mocking others when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

Want proof? Go to China -- where you will find many people cooking on single, portable electric hot plates or small disposable gas canisters -- and find me the cast-iron woks they'll all be using, if your theory of wok usage is correct.

Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat- ...


I have watched Yao Ming shoot free throws so if you guys have a question about Chinese culture just ask me.
 
2014-01-06 12:02:34 AM  

mjjt: iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...

This what you have in mind?

[i40.tinypic.com image 818x1152]


That's very cool looking, what is it?
 
2014-01-06 12:03:57 AM  

max_pooper: And you a prime example of an American who knows about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large


I'm not entirely sure, given the appalling grammar, what exactly you're trying to say. However, let me try:

* I'm not American. (I do now live in the United States, however.)
* I've spent more than half of my life living in Asia, and my family has spent over half a century living in Asia (or collectively, probably a couple of centuries between us, just for my immediate family)
* We mostly dined at restaurants (large and small) that the typical foreigner wouldn't know about or would shun altogether, even foreigners who'd been living there for some time. It was relatively rare to see other gweilos in the places where we dined. And we dined out regularly, at least a couple of times a week for the two decades and change that I lived there.
* I enjoy cooking Asian (and especially Chinese) food myself, and do so from authentic recipes in Asian cookbooks (Taiwanese, mostly) as well as from translated Asian blogs. My family (and especially my parents) likewise enjoy cooking Asian food.
* I travel to Asia regularly, and will next be there in less than 90 days
* I've tried Chinese / Chinese American food in the US both in major cities with Chinatowns (San Francisco: 7/10, Chicago 6/10, New York 7.5/10, Atlanta surprisingly 8/10) and in large / small chain and mom-and-pop restaurants in small towns in quite a few states.

So yes, I believe I know of what I speak.
 
2014-01-06 12:05:43 AM  

gweilo8888: max_pooper: And you a prime example of an American who knows about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large

I'm not entirely sure, given the appalling grammar, what exactly you're trying to say. However, let me try:

* I'm not American. (I do now live in the United States, however.)
* I've spent more than half of my life living in Asia, and my family has spent over half a century living in Asia (or collectively, probably a couple of centuries between us, just for my immediate family)
* We mostly dined at restaurants (large and small) that the typical foreigner wouldn't know about or would shun altogether, even foreigners who'd been living there for some time. It was relatively rare to see other gweilos in the places where we dined. And we dined out regularly, at least a couple of times a week for the two decades and change that I lived there.
* I enjoy cooking Asian (and especially Chinese) food myself, and do so from authentic recipes in Asian cookbooks (Taiwanese, mostly) as well as from translated Asian blogs. My family (and especially my parents) likewise enjoy cooking Asian food.
* I travel to Asia regularly, and will next be there in less than 90 days
* I've tried Chinese / Chinese American food in the US both in major cities with Chinatowns (San Francisco: 7/10, Chicago 6/10, New York 7.5/10, Atlanta surprisingly 8/10) and in large / small chain and mom-and-pop restaurants in small towns in quite a few states.

So yes, I believe I know of what I speak.


You may think you do, but you don't.
 
2014-01-06 12:11:56 AM  

gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.


What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?
 
2014-01-06 12:18:16 AM  

Aestatis: gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?


Evidently it is important for some reason. I have no life and was wondering myself.

http://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1153072/wok-for-my-large-egg
 
2014-01-06 12:21:37 AM  

chimp_ninja: lysdexic: I dunno. I think a lot of folks are doing it because of the cool factor. "My carbon footprint is smaller than yours, nyah!"

Their particular eccentricity seems harmless, however.  It's not for everyone, but it's a weird thing to be upset about.

There are plenty of other neighbors in the world with unusual hobbies that create lots of waste, noise, odors, etc.  I'd rather live next to Mr. Paper Bag Microhouse than some guy who spends his life working on his motorcycle.


Out of curiousity, why? Do you think someone working on a motorcycle would be noisy or something?

/works on motorcycle a lot . . .
 
2014-01-06 12:30:46 AM  

gweilo8888: So it's not surprising Americans know nothing about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.


O. M. G. Americans "know nothing about Chinese food". Color me abso-farking-lutely stunned.

Next thing you'll tell me, The English don't make very good pizza.

Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.

You're "mocking others when you don't when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about." How many do you know? Do you really "have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

I know one. And his wok works as expected. Ergo, ipso facto, e pluribus unum, you're wrong.

So STFU.
 
2014-01-06 12:31:46 AM  

mjjt: iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...

This what you have in mind?

[i40.tinypic.com image 818x1152]


That's a village well in Minecraft, yes?
 
2014-01-06 12:34:36 AM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


Um... what do you think they were made of before steel became cheap to produce and work? Everything I've read/seen indicates that cast iron woks were around long before steel ones, and are still used in *China*. Steel probably became more popular once it was cheap because it's light and easier to care for.
 
2014-01-06 12:40:13 AM  

max_pooper: You may think you do, but you don't.


Suuuuure. Care to list your experience? How many decades did you live in Asia? How many trained Chinese chefs (proper Chinese, not American Chinese) do you count among your close friends?

Actually, don't bother. You're on ignore for being an obstinate asshat who clearly doesn't know what he's talking about. Buh-bye now.

Aestatis: What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?


Much the same as the ability to lower the heat on a Western-style stove. (Or do you turn the dial to 11 for everything you cook?)

Certain foods cook extremely quickly, burn, toughen or dry out easily, and require a lower heat once added. Watch a proper Chinese chef cooking and you'll see that the afterburner-like flame he cooks over is frequently turned down to a whisper at certain points. Depends what is being cooked. (And chances are, he's controlling the heat with one knee , the wok with one hand, and utensils with the other, if he's busy. It's pretty cool to watch.)

ArcadianRefugee: O. M. G. Americans "know nothing about Chinese food". Color me abso-farking-lutely stunned.

Next thing you'll tell me, The English don't make very good pizza.

Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.

You're "mocking others when you don't when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about." How many do you know? Do you really "have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

I know one. And his wok works as expected. Ergo, ipso facto, e pluribus unum, you're wrong.

So STFU.


His wok works as expected by somebody who doesn't know what a wok is supposed to do, so that makes it right?

That is the most twisted and nonsensical logic I've ever seen. So do go on, explain why cast iron woks don't exist in China. After all, they make them for us, so they have very easy access to them. So why don't they use them, if they work so well?

BECAUSE THEY DON'T WORK RIGHT.

You, too, are on ignore for being an obstinate idiot who clearly knows nothing about the subject, yet is too stubborn to admit you're wrong. Buh-bye now.
 
2014-01-06 12:47:32 AM  

mllawso: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Um... what do you think they were made of before steel became cheap to produce and work? Everything I've read/seen indicates that cast iron woks were around long before steel ones, and are still used in *China*. Steel probably became more popular once it was cheap because it's light and easier to care for.


They were, once, largely cast iron, you're correct, However, they were constructed completely differently to cast-iron woks used in the US. They were made as thin as possible -- unlike the thick cast iron woks popular with Americans -- because the objective of a wok is not to hold heat. It is to pass it through the wok as quickly as possible, and in a concentrated area that's used for cooking, while the remainder of the wok space has a much lower temperature. Again, a cast-iron wok fails here because you don't have that gradient of temperature -- the whole damned thing gets baking hot, and you can't move food off to the lower heat outside the central cooking area.

And if you look for cast iron woks now in China, you will not find them. Cheap steel woks are readily available and seen as superior, because even a thin cast iron wok holds too much heat. Which is rather the crux of this whole matter. Heat retention is not and never has been a desirable characteristic of a wok, which is why the thick, heavy cast iron woks sold in the US are ridiculous.
 
2014-01-06 12:48:23 AM  
That should read "used for fast cooking", sorry.
 
2014-01-06 12:55:50 AM  
Incidentally, for those who care to expand their knowledge, rather than just spouting nonsense, a little reading might be in order:

https://web.archive.org/web/20120204055944/http://www.staff.hum.ku.d k/ dbwagner/wok/wok.html

Sorry for the archive.org link, but the original site no longer exists. Note that Donald B. Wagner is an expert in metallurgy and Asian studies.

More importantly, note that even with mid-1800s technology, Chinese cast iron woks a meter or more in diameter were routinely cast just a few millimeters thick, the reason for that thinness once again being that heat retention is an undesirable characteristic in a wok.
 
2014-01-06 12:56:27 AM  
Whoops, forgot the link to Wagner's CV, which I intended to include to back up the archive link provided:  http://donwagner.dk/EnglishCV.html
 
2014-01-06 12:59:14 AM  

gweilo8888: mllawso: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Um... what do you think they were made of before steel became cheap to produce and work? Everything I've read/seen indicates that cast iron woks were around long before steel ones, and are still used in *China*. Steel probably became more popular once it was cheap because it's light and easier to care for.

They were, once, largely cast iron, you're correct, However, they were constructed completely differently to cast-iron woks used in the US. They were made as thin as possible -- unlike the thick cast iron woks popular with Americans -- because the objective of a wok is not to hold heat. It is to pass it through the wok as quickly as possible, and in a concentrated area that's used for cooking, while the remainder of the wok space has a much lower temperature. Again, a cast-iron wok fails here because you don't have that gradient of temperature -- the whole damned thing gets baking hot, and you can't move food off to the lower heat outside the central cooking area.

And if you look for cast iron woks now in China, you will not find them. Cheap steel woks are readily available and seen as superior, because even a thin cast iron wok holds too much heat. Which is rather the crux of this whole matter. Heat retention is not and never has been a desirable characteristic of a wok, which is why the thick, heavy cast iron woks sold in the US are ridiculous.


More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?
 
2014-01-06 01:01:00 AM  

gweilo8888: max_pooper: You may think you do, but you don't.

Suuuuure. Care to list your experience? How many decades did you live in Asia? How many trained Chinese chefs (proper Chinese, not American Chinese) do you count among your close friends?

Actually, don't bother. You're on ignore for being an obstinate asshat who clearly doesn't know what he's talking about. Buh-bye now.

Aestatis: What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?

Much the same as the ability to lower the heat on a Western-style stove. (Or do you turn the dial to 11 for everything you cook?)

Certain foods cook extremely quickly, burn, toughen or dry out easily, and require a lower heat once added. Watch a proper Chinese chef cooking and you'll see that the afterburner-like flame he cooks over is frequently turned down to a whisper at certain points. Depends what is being cooked. (And chances are, he's controlling the heat with one knee , the wok with one hand, and utensils with the other, if he's busy. It's pretty cool to watch.)

ArcadianRefugee: O. M. G. Americans "know nothing about Chinese food". Color me abso-farking-lutely stunned.

Next thing you'll tell me, The English don't make very good pizza.

Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.

You're "mocking others when you don't when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about." How many do you know? Do you really "have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

I know one. And his wok works as expected. Ergo, ipso facto, e pluribus unum, you're wrong.

So STFU.

His wok works as expected by somebody who doesn't know what a wok is supposed to do, so that makes it right?

That is the most twisted and nonsensical logic I've ever seen. So do go on, explain why cast iron woks don't exist in China. After all, they make them for us, so they have very easy access to them. So why don't they use them, if they work so well?

BECAUSE THEY DON'T WORK RIGHT.

You, too, are on ignore for being an obstinate idiot who clearly knows nothing about the subject, yet is too stubborn to admit you're wrong. Buh-bye now.


You have proven that you know nothing about wok cooking and the physics behind it. Living in Asia or having a Chinese friend who is a chef doesn't make you an expert. Claiming expertise when you have shown zero knowledge on the subject makes me think you are only trying to sound smart.

A steel wok doesn't work very well on a standard 9,000 btu burner that most American's have in their kitchens. Chinese kitchens have high BTU burners for using a wok. In an American kitchen, a cast iron is preferred for quickly transferring the large amounts of heat into the food that is required for wok cooking.

Steel is great because it is light weight and reacts to temperature changes quickly but it requires a heat source greater than most people in the US have available.

Your claim that people who use a cast iron don't know what they are doing is pure ignorance and I'm glad that other people have chosen to point out your stupidity.

ps Cast iron woke are used in China. I have seen them in use with my own eyes.
 
2014-01-06 01:02:05 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: mjjt: iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...

This what you have in mind?

[i40.tinypic.com image 818x1152]

That's very cool looking, what is it?


Can't rem where I grabbed it from, but google image on 'forest library' and its all over first page

Try this ref  http://www.shedworking.co.uk/2010/12/forest-library-shedworking.html
 
2014-01-06 01:04:27 AM  

Harry_Seldon: More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?


Steel, steel, and only steel. The only reason to buy a cast-iron wok is if, for some reason, you cannot obtain a steel one. Or if the only steel one you can obtain is nonstick-coated, and you can obtain a proper, thin cast-iron wok instead of a thick, American cast-iron "wok". (Woks should be seasoned, not nonstick, but if it came down to it, I would choose a thin nonstick wok over a thick cast-iron wok because at least you haven't sacrificed your heat control. Although bear in mind that cooking at a proper wok heat will likely cause release of toxins into your food produced when Teflon / PTFE is overheated. So really, ditch the cast iron and Teflon, and go find a proper wok instead.)
 
2014-01-06 01:13:43 AM  
Did a thread about pretentious microhome owners really devolve into a flame war over what type of woks are used in China?
 
2014-01-06 01:15:59 AM  
This went from a tiny house thread to the Ministry Of Silly Woks.
 
2014-01-06 01:17:37 AM  

gweilo8888: Harry_Seldon: More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?

Steel, steel, and only steel. The only reason to buy a cast-iron wok is if, for some reason, you cannot obtain a steel one. Or if the only steel one you can obtain is nonstick-coated, and you can obtain a proper, thin cast-iron wok instead of a thick, American cast-iron "wok". (Woks should be seasoned, not nonstick, but if it came down to it, I would choose a thin nonstick wok over a thick cast-iron wok because at least you haven't sacrificed your heat control. Although bear in mind that cooking at a proper wok heat will likely cause release of toxins into your food produced when Teflon / PTFE is overheated. So really, ditch the cast iron and Teflon, and go find a proper wok instead.)


Wrong, again.

Steel is preferred if you have the heat source. Most kitchens outside of Asia don't have burners with enough power to properly cook on a steel wok.

Heavy cast iron will give you better results on a typical American stove.

Thermodynamics: how does it work?
 
2014-01-06 01:20:39 AM  

max_pooper: gweilo8888: Harry_Seldon: More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?

Steel, steel, and only steel. The only reason to buy a cast-iron wok is if, for some reason, you cannot obtain a steel one. Or if the only steel one you can obtain is nonstick-coated, and you can obtain a proper, thin cast-iron wok instead of a thick, American cast-iron "wok". (Woks should be seasoned, not nonstick, but if it came down to it, I would choose a thin nonstick wok over a thick cast-iron wok because at least you haven't sacrificed your heat control. Although bear in mind that cooking at a proper wok heat will likely cause release of toxins into your food produced when Teflon / PTFE is overheated. So really, ditch the cast iron and Teflon, and go find a proper wok instead.)

Wrong, again.

Steel is preferred if you have the heat source. Most kitchens outside of Asia don't have burners with enough power to properly cook on a steel wok.

Heavy cast iron will give you better results on a typical American stove.

Thermodynamics: how does it work?


That's it...I refuse to buy a tiny house until all this wok controversy gets settled.
 
TWX
2014-01-06 01:26:32 AM  

Tyrosine: That was great and all, but I'll keep my 3500 ft2 mid-century modern.


Yeah, if I wanted to live in something the size of a garden shed I'd find a different place to put the lawnmower and string trimmer...

/has too much living space
//better than having too little living space
 
2014-01-06 01:31:18 AM  

Harry_Seldon: That's it...I refuse to buy a tiny house until all this wok controversy gets settled.


Hah! Go look in a tiny Chinese house -- cooking over a single, portable electric hob or canister gas burner, or perhaps even charcoal, all of which would struggle to get near the heat of an American stove -- and the controversy shall disappear in an instant. You will not find anything even remotely resembling a clunky, heat-retaining American cast iron "wok" in a Chinese household. I can  100% guarantee that.
 
2014-01-06 01:35:35 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: This went from a tiny house thread to the Ministry Of Silly Woks.


Thank you for causing the people around me to be frightened by my sudden outburst of laughter.
 
2014-01-06 01:58:33 AM  

mikeray: Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat- ...

I have watched Yao Ming shoot free throws so if you guys have a question about Chinese culture just ask me.


I picked up some american cookware.  It was teflon and paper thin aluminum.    Americans must use this to cook their food because
it is so great and is used by all the finest chefs.

The pots being 8$ for the entire SET had nothing to do with it though.  I am sure when you are making 32 cents a day, your cookwear and clothes might be paper thin.
 
2014-01-06 02:27:47 AM  

gweilo8888: His wok works as expected by somebody who doesn't know what a wok is supposed to do, so that makes it right?


It makes it sufficient for his needs, which is all that matters.

I'm sure there are a lot of things that, if I did them, would allow me to do X, but if I don't give a shiat, then the way I do things is just fine.

Short version: your initial comment is akin to all of those stupid "You've been doing it wrong" articles Fark routinely links to.
 
2014-01-06 02:33:53 AM  
The great advantage of a tiny house is its cost.  We own one on 44 acres, 14 X 28, so not unbearably tiny.  We own it, not the bank.

No mortgage.

Dinner parties out on the terrace.

Steel wok.
 
2014-01-06 03:28:45 AM  

ameeriklane: Did a thread about pretentious microhome owners really devolve into a flame war over what type of woks are used in China?


This is Fark. So yes.

/It's food fight central here
//Don't get them started on pizza
///It's very controversia
l
 
2014-01-06 03:54:24 AM  

Nutsac_Jim: I picked up some american cookware.  It was teflon and paper thin aluminum.    Americans must use this to cook their food because
it is so great and is used by all the finest chefs.

The pots being 8$ for the entire SET had nothing to do with it though.  I am sure when you are making 32 cents a day, your cookwear and clothes might be paper thin.


[iseewhatyoudidthere.jpg]

But your theory falls apart because commercial woks are also intentionally thin and made from steel because they don't want heat retention. If paper-thin was only about cost, commercial chefs would go for thicker for durability reasons, but they don't.
 
2014-01-06 04:49:12 AM  
Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.
 
2014-01-06 04:54:02 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.


Is your dog cast iron?
 
Esn
2014-01-06 05:00:02 AM  
It's associated with hipsters in the U.S. now, but in Europe this is nothing new. You see tons of little dwellings like that if you ever visit Scandinavia, often in out-of-the-way locations.

And in the Soviet Union it used to be legal to build private structures only if they were very small - which was meant more to allow tool shacks and the like but people began to build little living spaces within the allowed space.
 
2014-01-06 05:19:01 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.


images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-01-06 05:26:28 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.

Is your dog cast iron?


Probably, I got him cheap and he seems to retain heat well.
 
2014-01-06 07:42:27 AM  
I am so going to get fired now at wok, I was sneaking in a bit of Fark before actual lunchtime and I cannot stop laughing!!
 
2014-01-06 08:29:24 AM  

gweilo8888: Nutsac_Jim: I picked up some american cookware.  It was teflon and paper thin aluminum.    Americans must use this to cook their food because
it is so great and is used by all the finest chefs.

The pots being 8$ for the entire SET had nothing to do with it though.  I am sure when you are making 32 cents a day, your cookwear and clothes might be paper thin.

[iseewhatyoudidthere.jpg]

But your theory falls apart because commercial woks are also intentionally thin and made from steel because they don't want heat retention. If paper-thin was only about cost, commercial chefs would go for thicker for durability reasons, but they don't.


Commercial kitchens have 100btu burners. Home kichens do not.

You are moran who knows very little about heat transfer and how it effects cooking.
 
2014-01-06 08:47:53 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.


Yeppers. I have a Lodge wok. It are teh wunderful.

/drive by posting.
//will not enter this argument.
 
2014-01-06 08:51:43 AM  
Huh. That egghead link was interesting, but it doesn't mean what the poster thought it meant. Cast iron woks and steel carbon woks have their place and some people use both for different things.

Now here's a fun link. A thread on the Egghead site about how big is your house.
 
2014-01-06 09:15:09 AM  

Tyrosine: That was great and all, but I'll keep my 3500 ft2 mid-century modern.


this...
 
2014-01-06 09:57:40 AM  

lysdexic: Huh. That egghead link was interesting, but it doesn't mean what the poster thought it meant. Cast iron woks and steel carbon woks have their place and some people use both for different things.


But they don't use a thick cast-iron "wok" as a wok, because it isn't a wok any more than a chocolate cigarette is a cigarette.

But what I've learned from this thread is that tiny-house yuppies will gang together in their to-the-death defence of utterly illogical cooking tools, despite all the available evidence of how a wok is supposed to work (and has been for well over a century), presumably because they spent their yuppie dollars on them already.
 
2014-01-06 10:06:28 AM  
The whole time I was looking at this I kept thinking that we could make some really nice Hoovervilles this time around.
 
2014-01-06 10:16:12 AM  
Oh, how you tried,
To cut me down to size
Telling dirty lies to my friends

But my own father said,
Give her up, don't bother
The world isn't coming to an end

He said it, wok like a man
Talk like a man
Wok like a man my son

Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh
 
2014-01-06 10:18:46 AM  
While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.
 
2014-01-06 10:22:47 AM  

dolphkhan: While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.


But gang-trolling me when I was the very first person who commented on the wok thing from the video -- well, that was totally non-douchey.

/I'm not the douche here
 
2014-01-06 10:30:18 AM  

gweilo8888: dolphkhan: While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.

But gang-trolling me when I was the very first person who commented on the wok thing from the video -- well, that was totally non-douchey.

/I'm not the douche here


Scroll back up and re-read the whole sequence. You flipped your shiat in your second post, replying to one perfectly reasonable statement and one admittedly condescending one. You were fair game after that.
 
2014-01-06 10:39:07 AM  

dolphkhan: gweilo8888: dolphkhan: While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.

But gang-trolling me when I was the very first person who commented on the wok thing from the video -- well, that was totally non-douchey.

/I'm not the douche here

Scroll back up and re-read the whole sequence. You flipped your shiat in your second post, replying to one perfectly reasonable statement and one admittedly condescending one. You were fair game after that.


Yes you are an absolute dick.
 
2014-01-06 10:41:06 AM  

dolphkhan: Scroll back up and re-read the whole sequence. You flipped your shiat in your second post, replying to one perfectly reasonable statement and one admittedly condescending one. You were fair game after that.


That's your interpretation. The "perfectly reasonable" post was anything but, in my opinion. Somebody who clearly didn't know what a wok is actually for and how it works decided to stick their oar in and "school me" with a load of nonsense about how works are supposed to work.

And then there was the completely douchetastic brofist follow-up you mention, again with me not yet having posted a single reply.

I'd only have been fair game if I was wrong. I wasn't.
 
2014-01-06 10:55:14 AM  

gweilo8888: lysdexic: Huh. That egghead link was interesting, but it doesn't mean what the poster thought it meant. Cast iron woks and steel carbon woks have their place and some people use both for different things.

But they don't use a thick cast-iron "wok" as a wok, because it isn't a wok any more than a chocolate cigarette is a cigarette.


I do use my cast wok as a wok. My stove top is electric so I have a small portable propane burner that i use inside the house.  It's pretty weak so I use the cast wok on it due to its heat retention. Cooking with it does involve a lot of putting things in and taking them out and then combining all the ingredients at the end.

I also have a very nice hand hammered wok that I picked up when I lived in Japan. I use this one outside on a burner repurposed from a turkey fryer.

/just saying
 
2014-01-06 11:53:44 AM  
Watching_Epoxy_Cure:
There are plenty of other neighbors in the world with unusual hobbies that create lots of waste, noise, odors, etc.  I'd rather live next to Mr. Paper Bag Microhouse than some guy who spends his life working on his motorcycle.

Out of curiousity, why? Do you think someone working on a motorcycle would be noisy or something?

/works on motorcycle a lot . . .


He must hate classical music...  I always listen to classical when I'm wrenching on the bikes.
 
2014-01-06 12:08:19 PM  

moike: He must hate classical music... I always listen to classical when I'm wrenching on the bikes.


I've always listened to the blues.

/harley rider
// SRV freak
 
2014-01-06 12:38:20 PM  
gweilo8888:

Aestatis: What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?

Much the same as the ability to lower the heat on a Western-style stove. (Or do you turn the dial to 11 for everything you cook?)

Certain foods cook extremely quickly, burn, toughen or dry out easily, and require a lower heat once added. Watch a proper Chinese chef cooking and you'll see that the afterburner-like flame he cooks over is frequently turned down to a whisper at certain points. Depends what is being cooked. (And chances are, he's controlling the heat with one knee , the wok with one hand, and utensils with the other, if he's busy. It's pretty cool to watch.)


This seems like an argument against ever using cast iron, as opposed to a reason not to use a cast iron wok.  How do people manage with their other properly non-wok cast iron pots and pans?  Or is it particularly chinese cooking in woks that requires a mix of foods that don't cook at the same temperature to be cooked in the same pan?
 
2014-01-06 02:12:38 PM  

Aestatis: This seems like an argument against ever using cast iron, as opposed to a reason not to use a cast iron wok.  How do people manage with their other properly non-wok cast iron pots and pans?  Or is it particularly chinese cooking in woks that requires a mix of foods that don't cook at the same temperature to be cooked in the same pan?


It's most assuredly not. Cast iron has its uses for which it is excellent: In some situations having a temperature-retentive cooking container / surface (be it a pot, pan, sheet, or something else) is a very useful thing.

It's just not useful for *actual* wok cooking. Pretend wok cooking, sure, but it's wrong to call it a wok, because it isn't -- it's an undefined wok-shaped pot/pan of some kind. It doesn't cook food in remotely the way a real wok does.
 
2014-01-06 03:08:30 PM  
Hurm... they can't like wine much, their "rack" would shake all the bottles up whenever someone wants to access just one (or get to the crawlspace).
 
2014-01-06 05:39:22 PM  

Odoriferous Queef: moike: He must hate classical music... I always listen to classical when I'm wrenching on the bikes.

I've always listened to the blues.

/harley rider
// SRV freak


I have to listen to something that calms the nerves... classical is good for that.

Otherwise there would be nothing but cussing and screaming coming out of the garage and maybe the occasional desmodromic valvetrain hurled at great velocity.

/it's a love-hate relationship
 
2014-01-06 06:19:33 PM  
I think I just witnessed an internet slap-fight over what metal a wok should be made of. I... uh... wow.
 
2014-01-06 06:22:14 PM  

moike: Odoriferous Queef: moike: He must hate classical music... I always listen to classical when I'm wrenching on the bikes.

I've always listened to the blues.

/harley rider
// SRV freak

I have to listen to something that calms the nerves... classical is good for that.

Otherwise there would be nothing but cussing and screaming coming out of the garage and maybe the occasional desmodromic valvetrain hurled at great velocity.

/it's a love-hate relationship


what kind of Duc you got? I had a little seat time with a 916 on my way to Sturgis one year.  Nice bike.
 
2014-01-06 07:20:23 PM  
Wife and I have moved into an 800 SF cabin and have been here full time for a few years now.  It's tight, and we do have a shed in which we can store some stuff we don't need all the time - like golf clubs, skiis, tools, etc.  It's nice heating a small place and it's cozy but it's also doable.

I look at the 140 square foot places and think that it's possible for one person, but I know that unless you lived where you can be outdoors year around [which does not describe our location - winter is COLD], I think they are just too small for two people.

We downsized from about 2,000 sf of house.  Personally, I've never been happier, I think my wife feels cramped.  Fortunately, we live in such a nice location that finding a larger replacement house - as she would like - has been a challenge.
 
2014-01-06 08:47:37 PM  

GreenAdder: I think I just witnessed an internet slap-fight over what metal a wok should be made of. I... uh... wow.


The metal is less important than the thickness.

/that's what she said
 
2014-01-06 10:04:41 PM  

gweilo8888: kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


gweilo8888: I was the very first person who commented on the wok thing from the video -- well, that was totally non-douchey.


You seem... out of touch.
 
2014-01-06 10:47:24 PM  

LordOfThePings: gweilo8888: kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


Was a comment directed at the woman in the video. As was fairly obvious.

/also, [welcometofark.jpg] -- not everything here is intended to be serious
//to be clear, I don't espouse death for cast-iron wok owners.
///bamboo splinters hammered under the nails and then soaked in water should be sufficient
 
2014-01-06 11:00:51 PM  

gweilo8888: LordOfThePings: gweilo8888: kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Was a comment directed at the woman in the video. As was fairly obvious.

/also, [welcometofark.jpg] -- not everything here is intended to be serious
//to be clear, I don't espouse death for cast-iron wok owners.
///bamboo splinters hammered under the nails and then soaked in water should be sufficient


Heh. Playing the welcometofark card after playing the farkersgangeduponme card is a smooth gambit!
 
2014-01-07 02:07:07 AM  

LordOfThePings: Heh. Playing the welcometofark card after playing the farkersgangeduponme card is a smooth gambit!


At this point, any gambit is going to go unseen by the world, smooth or otherwise. But then I don't really go in for gambits -- I speak my mind.
 
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