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(Curbed)   Purer-than-thou microhome owner slams other microhome owners for selling out, wanting to create McMansions on their tiny plot of land instead of cabins with beanbag walls, tin-can siding and used TJ's bag wallpaper   (curbed.com) divider line 160
    More: Stupid, McMansion, log cabins, mess  
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13359 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jan 2014 at 7:50 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-06 12:11:56 AM  

gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.


What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?
 
2014-01-06 12:18:16 AM  

Aestatis: gweilo8888: TuteTibiImperes: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Cast iron woks can make sense for a home kitchen.  The idea behind most wok cooking is very fast at very high heat.  Most home ranges can't produce the BTU output woks are traditionally meant to be used with.   Cast iron retains heat better than carbon steel so you can take the time to bring it up to searing temps on a home range and not have it lose that heat as soon as you throw the cold food into it, thus cooking your food in a way similar to how it would be done with a lighter weight steel wok on a wok burner.

No, they do not. If you think they do, then you do not know what a wok is for, pure and simple.

A wok should be able to cool down just as quickly as it heats up. A cast iron wok cannot do so, and therefore it is useless.

What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?


Evidently it is important for some reason. I have no life and was wondering myself.

http://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1153072/wok-for-my-large-egg
 
2014-01-06 12:21:37 AM  

chimp_ninja: lysdexic: I dunno. I think a lot of folks are doing it because of the cool factor. "My carbon footprint is smaller than yours, nyah!"

Their particular eccentricity seems harmless, however.  It's not for everyone, but it's a weird thing to be upset about.

There are plenty of other neighbors in the world with unusual hobbies that create lots of waste, noise, odors, etc.  I'd rather live next to Mr. Paper Bag Microhouse than some guy who spends his life working on his motorcycle.


Out of curiousity, why? Do you think someone working on a motorcycle would be noisy or something?

/works on motorcycle a lot . . .
 
2014-01-06 12:30:46 AM  

gweilo8888: So it's not surprising Americans know nothing about Chinese food and Chinese cooking, by and large.


O. M. G. Americans "know nothing about Chinese food". Color me abso-farking-lutely stunned.

Next thing you'll tell me, The English don't make very good pizza.

Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.

You're "mocking others when you don't when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about." How many do you know? Do you really "have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

I know one. And his wok works as expected. Ergo, ipso facto, e pluribus unum, you're wrong.

So STFU.
 
2014-01-06 12:31:46 AM  

mjjt: iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...

This what you have in mind?

[i40.tinypic.com image 818x1152]


That's a village well in Minecraft, yes?
 
2014-01-06 12:34:36 AM  

gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.


Um... what do you think they were made of before steel became cheap to produce and work? Everything I've read/seen indicates that cast iron woks were around long before steel ones, and are still used in *China*. Steel probably became more popular once it was cheap because it's light and easier to care for.
 
2014-01-06 12:40:13 AM  

max_pooper: You may think you do, but you don't.


Suuuuure. Care to list your experience? How many decades did you live in Asia? How many trained Chinese chefs (proper Chinese, not American Chinese) do you count among your close friends?

Actually, don't bother. You're on ignore for being an obstinate asshat who clearly doesn't know what he's talking about. Buh-bye now.

Aestatis: What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?


Much the same as the ability to lower the heat on a Western-style stove. (Or do you turn the dial to 11 for everything you cook?)

Certain foods cook extremely quickly, burn, toughen or dry out easily, and require a lower heat once added. Watch a proper Chinese chef cooking and you'll see that the afterburner-like flame he cooks over is frequently turned down to a whisper at certain points. Depends what is being cooked. (And chances are, he's controlling the heat with one knee , the wok with one hand, and utensils with the other, if he's busy. It's pretty cool to watch.)

ArcadianRefugee: O. M. G. Americans "know nothing about Chinese food". Color me abso-farking-lutely stunned.

Next thing you'll tell me, The English don't make very good pizza.

Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.

You're "mocking others when you don't when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about." How many do you know? Do you really "have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

I know one. And his wok works as expected. Ergo, ipso facto, e pluribus unum, you're wrong.

So STFU.


His wok works as expected by somebody who doesn't know what a wok is supposed to do, so that makes it right?

That is the most twisted and nonsensical logic I've ever seen. So do go on, explain why cast iron woks don't exist in China. After all, they make them for us, so they have very easy access to them. So why don't they use them, if they work so well?

BECAUSE THEY DON'T WORK RIGHT.

You, too, are on ignore for being an obstinate idiot who clearly knows nothing about the subject, yet is too stubborn to admit you're wrong. Buh-bye now.
 
2014-01-06 12:47:32 AM  

mllawso: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Um... what do you think they were made of before steel became cheap to produce and work? Everything I've read/seen indicates that cast iron woks were around long before steel ones, and are still used in *China*. Steel probably became more popular once it was cheap because it's light and easier to care for.


They were, once, largely cast iron, you're correct, However, they were constructed completely differently to cast-iron woks used in the US. They were made as thin as possible -- unlike the thick cast iron woks popular with Americans -- because the objective of a wok is not to hold heat. It is to pass it through the wok as quickly as possible, and in a concentrated area that's used for cooking, while the remainder of the wok space has a much lower temperature. Again, a cast-iron wok fails here because you don't have that gradient of temperature -- the whole damned thing gets baking hot, and you can't move food off to the lower heat outside the central cooking area.

And if you look for cast iron woks now in China, you will not find them. Cheap steel woks are readily available and seen as superior, because even a thin cast iron wok holds too much heat. Which is rather the crux of this whole matter. Heat retention is not and never has been a desirable characteristic of a wok, which is why the thick, heavy cast iron woks sold in the US are ridiculous.
 
2014-01-06 12:48:23 AM  
That should read "used for fast cooking", sorry.
 
2014-01-06 12:55:50 AM  
Incidentally, for those who care to expand their knowledge, rather than just spouting nonsense, a little reading might be in order:

https://web.archive.org/web/20120204055944/http://www.staff.hum.ku.d k/ dbwagner/wok/wok.html

Sorry for the archive.org link, but the original site no longer exists. Note that Donald B. Wagner is an expert in metallurgy and Asian studies.

More importantly, note that even with mid-1800s technology, Chinese cast iron woks a meter or more in diameter were routinely cast just a few millimeters thick, the reason for that thinness once again being that heat retention is an undesirable characteristic in a wok.
 
2014-01-06 12:56:27 AM  
Whoops, forgot the link to Wagner's CV, which I intended to include to back up the archive link provided:  http://donwagner.dk/EnglishCV.html
 
2014-01-06 12:59:14 AM  

gweilo8888: mllawso: gweilo8888: Dear people who buy a cast-iron "wok": You have completely missed the point of woks, and should kill yourselves now. Kthxbye.

Um... what do you think they were made of before steel became cheap to produce and work? Everything I've read/seen indicates that cast iron woks were around long before steel ones, and are still used in *China*. Steel probably became more popular once it was cheap because it's light and easier to care for.

They were, once, largely cast iron, you're correct, However, they were constructed completely differently to cast-iron woks used in the US. They were made as thin as possible -- unlike the thick cast iron woks popular with Americans -- because the objective of a wok is not to hold heat. It is to pass it through the wok as quickly as possible, and in a concentrated area that's used for cooking, while the remainder of the wok space has a much lower temperature. Again, a cast-iron wok fails here because you don't have that gradient of temperature -- the whole damned thing gets baking hot, and you can't move food off to the lower heat outside the central cooking area.

And if you look for cast iron woks now in China, you will not find them. Cheap steel woks are readily available and seen as superior, because even a thin cast iron wok holds too much heat. Which is rather the crux of this whole matter. Heat retention is not and never has been a desirable characteristic of a wok, which is why the thick, heavy cast iron woks sold in the US are ridiculous.


More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?
 
2014-01-06 01:01:00 AM  

gweilo8888: max_pooper: You may think you do, but you don't.

Suuuuure. Care to list your experience? How many decades did you live in Asia? How many trained Chinese chefs (proper Chinese, not American Chinese) do you count among your close friends?

Actually, don't bother. You're on ignore for being an obstinate asshat who clearly doesn't know what he's talking about. Buh-bye now.

Aestatis: What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?

Much the same as the ability to lower the heat on a Western-style stove. (Or do you turn the dial to 11 for everything you cook?)

Certain foods cook extremely quickly, burn, toughen or dry out easily, and require a lower heat once added. Watch a proper Chinese chef cooking and you'll see that the afterburner-like flame he cooks over is frequently turned down to a whisper at certain points. Depends what is being cooked. (And chances are, he's controlling the heat with one knee , the wok with one hand, and utensils with the other, if he's busy. It's pretty cool to watch.)

ArcadianRefugee: O. M. G. Americans "know nothing about Chinese food". Color me abso-farking-lutely stunned.

Next thing you'll tell me, The English don't make very good pizza.

Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.

You're "mocking others when you don't when you don't have the first farking clue what you're talking about." How many do you know? Do you really "have the first farking clue what you're talking about.

I know one. And his wok works as expected. Ergo, ipso facto, e pluribus unum, you're wrong.

So STFU.

His wok works as expected by somebody who doesn't know what a wok is supposed to do, so that makes it right?

That is the most twisted and nonsensical logic I've ever seen. So do go on, explain why cast iron woks don't exist in China. After all, they make them for us, so they have very easy access to them. So why don't they use them, if they work so well?

BECAUSE THEY DON'T WORK RIGHT.

You, too, are on ignore for being an obstinate idiot who clearly knows nothing about the subject, yet is too stubborn to admit you're wrong. Buh-bye now.


You have proven that you know nothing about wok cooking and the physics behind it. Living in Asia or having a Chinese friend who is a chef doesn't make you an expert. Claiming expertise when you have shown zero knowledge on the subject makes me think you are only trying to sound smart.

A steel wok doesn't work very well on a standard 9,000 btu burner that most American's have in their kitchens. Chinese kitchens have high BTU burners for using a wok. In an American kitchen, a cast iron is preferred for quickly transferring the large amounts of heat into the food that is required for wok cooking.

Steel is great because it is light weight and reacts to temperature changes quickly but it requires a heat source greater than most people in the US have available.

Your claim that people who use a cast iron don't know what they are doing is pure ignorance and I'm glad that other people have chosen to point out your stupidity.

ps Cast iron woke are used in China. I have seen them in use with my own eyes.
 
2014-01-06 01:02:05 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: mjjt: iamrex: propasaurus: I wonder if she built her microwave and fridge out of recycled fair trade coffee grounds and sustainably harvested bamboo?

That said, there's something about the tiny house thang that appeals to me for some reason.

Yeah, the microwave made me laugh.

I want a tiny house, but just for a getaway retreat in the woods...

This what you have in mind?

[i40.tinypic.com image 818x1152]

That's very cool looking, what is it?


Can't rem where I grabbed it from, but google image on 'forest library' and its all over first page

Try this ref  http://www.shedworking.co.uk/2010/12/forest-library-shedworking.html
 
2014-01-06 01:04:27 AM  

Harry_Seldon: More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?


Steel, steel, and only steel. The only reason to buy a cast-iron wok is if, for some reason, you cannot obtain a steel one. Or if the only steel one you can obtain is nonstick-coated, and you can obtain a proper, thin cast-iron wok instead of a thick, American cast-iron "wok". (Woks should be seasoned, not nonstick, but if it came down to it, I would choose a thin nonstick wok over a thick cast-iron wok because at least you haven't sacrificed your heat control. Although bear in mind that cooking at a proper wok heat will likely cause release of toxins into your food produced when Teflon / PTFE is overheated. So really, ditch the cast iron and Teflon, and go find a proper wok instead.)
 
2014-01-06 01:13:43 AM  
Did a thread about pretentious microhome owners really devolve into a flame war over what type of woks are used in China?
 
2014-01-06 01:15:59 AM  
This went from a tiny house thread to the Ministry Of Silly Woks.
 
2014-01-06 01:17:37 AM  

gweilo8888: Harry_Seldon: More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?

Steel, steel, and only steel. The only reason to buy a cast-iron wok is if, for some reason, you cannot obtain a steel one. Or if the only steel one you can obtain is nonstick-coated, and you can obtain a proper, thin cast-iron wok instead of a thick, American cast-iron "wok". (Woks should be seasoned, not nonstick, but if it came down to it, I would choose a thin nonstick wok over a thick cast-iron wok because at least you haven't sacrificed your heat control. Although bear in mind that cooking at a proper wok heat will likely cause release of toxins into your food produced when Teflon / PTFE is overheated. So really, ditch the cast iron and Teflon, and go find a proper wok instead.)


Wrong, again.

Steel is preferred if you have the heat source. Most kitchens outside of Asia don't have burners with enough power to properly cook on a steel wok.

Heavy cast iron will give you better results on a typical American stove.

Thermodynamics: how does it work?
 
2014-01-06 01:20:39 AM  

max_pooper: gweilo8888: Harry_Seldon: More importantly, is a steel or cast iron wok best for a tiny house kitchen?

Steel, steel, and only steel. The only reason to buy a cast-iron wok is if, for some reason, you cannot obtain a steel one. Or if the only steel one you can obtain is nonstick-coated, and you can obtain a proper, thin cast-iron wok instead of a thick, American cast-iron "wok". (Woks should be seasoned, not nonstick, but if it came down to it, I would choose a thin nonstick wok over a thick cast-iron wok because at least you haven't sacrificed your heat control. Although bear in mind that cooking at a proper wok heat will likely cause release of toxins into your food produced when Teflon / PTFE is overheated. So really, ditch the cast iron and Teflon, and go find a proper wok instead.)

Wrong, again.

Steel is preferred if you have the heat source. Most kitchens outside of Asia don't have burners with enough power to properly cook on a steel wok.

Heavy cast iron will give you better results on a typical American stove.

Thermodynamics: how does it work?


That's it...I refuse to buy a tiny house until all this wok controversy gets settled.
 
TWX
2014-01-06 01:26:32 AM  

Tyrosine: That was great and all, but I'll keep my 3500 ft2 mid-century modern.


Yeah, if I wanted to live in something the size of a garden shed I'd find a different place to put the lawnmower and string trimmer...

/has too much living space
//better than having too little living space
 
2014-01-06 01:31:18 AM  

Harry_Seldon: That's it...I refuse to buy a tiny house until all this wok controversy gets settled.


Hah! Go look in a tiny Chinese house -- cooking over a single, portable electric hob or canister gas burner, or perhaps even charcoal, all of which would struggle to get near the heat of an American stove -- and the controversy shall disappear in an instant. You will not find anything even remotely resembling a clunky, heat-retaining American cast iron "wok" in a Chinese household. I can  100% guarantee that.
 
2014-01-06 01:35:35 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: This went from a tiny house thread to the Ministry Of Silly Woks.


Thank you for causing the people around me to be frightened by my sudden outburst of laughter.
 
2014-01-06 01:58:33 AM  

mikeray: Note: They do not exist there, because they are completely useless as woks. What you will see being used is extremely lightweight, flimsy woks which transfer what heat the stove *does* manage to make as quickly as possible, rather than heat- ...

I have watched Yao Ming shoot free throws so if you guys have a question about Chinese culture just ask me.


I picked up some american cookware.  It was teflon and paper thin aluminum.    Americans must use this to cook their food because
it is so great and is used by all the finest chefs.

The pots being 8$ for the entire SET had nothing to do with it though.  I am sure when you are making 32 cents a day, your cookwear and clothes might be paper thin.
 
2014-01-06 02:27:47 AM  

gweilo8888: His wok works as expected by somebody who doesn't know what a wok is supposed to do, so that makes it right?


It makes it sufficient for his needs, which is all that matters.

I'm sure there are a lot of things that, if I did them, would allow me to do X, but if I don't give a shiat, then the way I do things is just fine.

Short version: your initial comment is akin to all of those stupid "You've been doing it wrong" articles Fark routinely links to.
 
2014-01-06 02:33:53 AM  
The great advantage of a tiny house is its cost.  We own one on 44 acres, 14 X 28, so not unbearably tiny.  We own it, not the bank.

No mortgage.

Dinner parties out on the terrace.

Steel wok.
 
2014-01-06 03:28:45 AM  

ameeriklane: Did a thread about pretentious microhome owners really devolve into a flame war over what type of woks are used in China?


This is Fark. So yes.

/It's food fight central here
//Don't get them started on pizza
///It's very controversia
l
 
2014-01-06 03:54:24 AM  

Nutsac_Jim: I picked up some american cookware.  It was teflon and paper thin aluminum.    Americans must use this to cook their food because
it is so great and is used by all the finest chefs.

The pots being 8$ for the entire SET had nothing to do with it though.  I am sure when you are making 32 cents a day, your cookwear and clothes might be paper thin.


[iseewhatyoudidthere.jpg]

But your theory falls apart because commercial woks are also intentionally thin and made from steel because they don't want heat retention. If paper-thin was only about cost, commercial chefs would go for thicker for durability reasons, but they don't.
 
2014-01-06 04:49:12 AM  
Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.
 
2014-01-06 04:54:02 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.


Is your dog cast iron?
 
Esn
2014-01-06 05:00:02 AM  
It's associated with hipsters in the U.S. now, but in Europe this is nothing new. You see tons of little dwellings like that if you ever visit Scandinavia, often in out-of-the-way locations.

And in the Soviet Union it used to be legal to build private structures only if they were very small - which was meant more to allow tool shacks and the like but people began to build little living spaces within the allowed space.
 
2014-01-06 05:19:01 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.


images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-01-06 05:26:28 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Good God y'all, this farking guy is more emotionally invested in other people's woks than I am in my dog.

Is your dog cast iron?


Probably, I got him cheap and he seems to retain heat well.
 
2014-01-06 07:42:27 AM  
I am so going to get fired now at wok, I was sneaking in a bit of Fark before actual lunchtime and I cannot stop laughing!!
 
2014-01-06 08:29:24 AM  

gweilo8888: Nutsac_Jim: I picked up some american cookware.  It was teflon and paper thin aluminum.    Americans must use this to cook their food because
it is so great and is used by all the finest chefs.

The pots being 8$ for the entire SET had nothing to do with it though.  I am sure when you are making 32 cents a day, your cookwear and clothes might be paper thin.

[iseewhatyoudidthere.jpg]

But your theory falls apart because commercial woks are also intentionally thin and made from steel because they don't want heat retention. If paper-thin was only about cost, commercial chefs would go for thicker for durability reasons, but they don't.


Commercial kitchens have 100btu burners. Home kichens do not.

You are moran who knows very little about heat transfer and how it effects cooking.
 
2014-01-06 08:47:53 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Fact is, a cast iron wok works wonderfully. It may take longer to get to usable temperature, but once it does it works just fine.


Yeppers. I have a Lodge wok. It are teh wunderful.

/drive by posting.
//will not enter this argument.
 
2014-01-06 08:51:43 AM  
Huh. That egghead link was interesting, but it doesn't mean what the poster thought it meant. Cast iron woks and steel carbon woks have their place and some people use both for different things.

Now here's a fun link. A thread on the Egghead site about how big is your house.
 
2014-01-06 09:15:09 AM  

Tyrosine: That was great and all, but I'll keep my 3500 ft2 mid-century modern.


this...
 
2014-01-06 09:57:40 AM  

lysdexic: Huh. That egghead link was interesting, but it doesn't mean what the poster thought it meant. Cast iron woks and steel carbon woks have their place and some people use both for different things.


But they don't use a thick cast-iron "wok" as a wok, because it isn't a wok any more than a chocolate cigarette is a cigarette.

But what I've learned from this thread is that tiny-house yuppies will gang together in their to-the-death defence of utterly illogical cooking tools, despite all the available evidence of how a wok is supposed to work (and has been for well over a century), presumably because they spent their yuppie dollars on them already.
 
2014-01-06 10:06:28 AM  
The whole time I was looking at this I kept thinking that we could make some really nice Hoovervilles this time around.
 
2014-01-06 10:16:12 AM  
Oh, how you tried,
To cut me down to size
Telling dirty lies to my friends

But my own father said,
Give her up, don't bother
The world isn't coming to an end

He said it, wok like a man
Talk like a man
Wok like a man my son

Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh
 
2014-01-06 10:18:46 AM  
While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.
 
2014-01-06 10:22:47 AM  

dolphkhan: While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.


But gang-trolling me when I was the very first person who commented on the wok thing from the video -- well, that was totally non-douchey.

/I'm not the douche here
 
2014-01-06 10:30:18 AM  

gweilo8888: dolphkhan: While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.

But gang-trolling me when I was the very first person who commented on the wok thing from the video -- well, that was totally non-douchey.

/I'm not the douche here


Scroll back up and re-read the whole sequence. You flipped your shiat in your second post, replying to one perfectly reasonable statement and one admittedly condescending one. You were fair game after that.
 
2014-01-06 10:39:07 AM  

dolphkhan: gweilo8888: dolphkhan: While I agree with a lot of what you say, gweillo8888, you're making your arguments in an extremely douchey manner. At this point, I think that people are pretty much just poking you with sticks to watch you rage out.

But gang-trolling me when I was the very first person who commented on the wok thing from the video -- well, that was totally non-douchey.

/I'm not the douche here

Scroll back up and re-read the whole sequence. You flipped your shiat in your second post, replying to one perfectly reasonable statement and one admittedly condescending one. You were fair game after that.


Yes you are an absolute dick.
 
2014-01-06 10:41:06 AM  

dolphkhan: Scroll back up and re-read the whole sequence. You flipped your shiat in your second post, replying to one perfectly reasonable statement and one admittedly condescending one. You were fair game after that.


That's your interpretation. The "perfectly reasonable" post was anything but, in my opinion. Somebody who clearly didn't know what a wok is actually for and how it works decided to stick their oar in and "school me" with a load of nonsense about how works are supposed to work.

And then there was the completely douchetastic brofist follow-up you mention, again with me not yet having posted a single reply.

I'd only have been fair game if I was wrong. I wasn't.
 
2014-01-06 10:55:14 AM  

gweilo8888: lysdexic: Huh. That egghead link was interesting, but it doesn't mean what the poster thought it meant. Cast iron woks and steel carbon woks have their place and some people use both for different things.

But they don't use a thick cast-iron "wok" as a wok, because it isn't a wok any more than a chocolate cigarette is a cigarette.


I do use my cast wok as a wok. My stove top is electric so I have a small portable propane burner that i use inside the house.  It's pretty weak so I use the cast wok on it due to its heat retention. Cooking with it does involve a lot of putting things in and taking them out and then combining all the ingredients at the end.

I also have a very nice hand hammered wok that I picked up when I lived in Japan. I use this one outside on a burner repurposed from a turkey fryer.

/just saying
 
2014-01-06 11:53:44 AM  
Watching_Epoxy_Cure:
There are plenty of other neighbors in the world with unusual hobbies that create lots of waste, noise, odors, etc.  I'd rather live next to Mr. Paper Bag Microhouse than some guy who spends his life working on his motorcycle.

Out of curiousity, why? Do you think someone working on a motorcycle would be noisy or something?

/works on motorcycle a lot . . .


He must hate classical music...  I always listen to classical when I'm wrenching on the bikes.
 
2014-01-06 12:08:19 PM  

moike: He must hate classical music... I always listen to classical when I'm wrenching on the bikes.


I've always listened to the blues.

/harley rider
// SRV freak
 
2014-01-06 12:38:20 PM  
gweilo8888:

Aestatis: What is the advantage to the wok cooling down quickly?

Much the same as the ability to lower the heat on a Western-style stove. (Or do you turn the dial to 11 for everything you cook?)

Certain foods cook extremely quickly, burn, toughen or dry out easily, and require a lower heat once added. Watch a proper Chinese chef cooking and you'll see that the afterburner-like flame he cooks over is frequently turned down to a whisper at certain points. Depends what is being cooked. (And chances are, he's controlling the heat with one knee , the wok with one hand, and utensils with the other, if he's busy. It's pretty cool to watch.)


This seems like an argument against ever using cast iron, as opposed to a reason not to use a cast iron wok.  How do people manage with their other properly non-wok cast iron pots and pans?  Or is it particularly chinese cooking in woks that requires a mix of foods that don't cook at the same temperature to be cooked in the same pan?
 
2014-01-06 02:12:38 PM  

Aestatis: This seems like an argument against ever using cast iron, as opposed to a reason not to use a cast iron wok.  How do people manage with their other properly non-wok cast iron pots and pans?  Or is it particularly chinese cooking in woks that requires a mix of foods that don't cook at the same temperature to be cooked in the same pan?


It's most assuredly not. Cast iron has its uses for which it is excellent: In some situations having a temperature-retentive cooking container / surface (be it a pot, pan, sheet, or something else) is a very useful thing.

It's just not useful for *actual* wok cooking. Pretend wok cooking, sure, but it's wrong to call it a wok, because it isn't -- it's an undefined wok-shaped pot/pan of some kind. It doesn't cook food in remotely the way a real wok does.
 
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