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(Huffington Post)   Vintage salad recipes that pretty much make healthy eating (or any eating at all) impossible   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 114
    More: Strange, healthy eating, salad recipes, salads, corn syrup, HuffPost Taste, recipes  
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11141 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jan 2014 at 8:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-05 10:00:16 AM  

SpdrJay: When I was a kid we had dandelion greens slathered in 10W40 as salad and we liked it!


You got multi-weight?

/you lucky bastard
 
2014-01-05 10:02:12 AM  
A favorite of mine is minced up  raw carrots, raisins (Or currants)  and a LITTLE mayo..Just enough to hold everything together.
 
2014-01-05 10:05:30 AM  

optikeye: hubiestubert: Yeah, gelatin was big back in the day. Savory as well as sweet. So were essentially forcemeat salads.

If you do a all beef meatloaf, put a 1/2 tsp of unflavored gelatin in the mix; along with the cracker crumbs, sauteed veggies--and a can of V8 to simmer the veggies; then 1 egg and crush saltine crackers...Which is moistened with the 1/2 tsp of gelatin in 1/2 cup of stock.

The Gelatine replaces the really good fat you'd get from using a veal, beef, pork meatloaf grind. And using a all beef (Hamburger meat) grind.

Glaze on ketchup/vinegar/brown sugar mix in 3 addtions on broil in the last 10-15 mins of cooking to get the really crusty bit.


Not in my house.
 
2014-01-05 10:10:40 AM  

Fast Talkin Fanny: Odoriferous Queef: Same here.  Speaking of Miracle Whip, I had an Aunt that loved fried Spam sammiches made with Wonder bread and Miracle Whip.

Hey! I grew up on SPAM and white bread sammiches.

/And frozen fish sticks


You must be from the South.
Once in a while I'll have some fish sticks......childhood memories.

/Oblig picture

data2.whicdn.com
 
2014-01-05 10:20:11 AM  

Odoriferous Queef: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Odoriferous Queef: Confabulat: I find the idea of Miracle Whip as salad dressing pretty hysterical. And horrifying.

Same here.  Speaking of Miracle Whip, I had an Aunt that loved fried Spam sammiches made with Wonder bread and Miracle Whip.

*shudder*

Ummm, that does not sound that bad.

Love me some Spam from time to time.

I too require the occasional input of Spam.  It's the Miracle Whip  and that aerated goo they call Wonder Bread that is off putting.


I personally prefer miracle whip.
 
2014-01-05 10:31:26 AM  
As a glutton, I would eat any of those. Especially the potato-salad loaf.
 
2014-01-05 10:42:22 AM  
buzzfeedingtonpost.com
 
2014-01-05 10:45:25 AM  
Boy we sure did suck at food back in the 50s.
 
2014-01-05 10:57:58 AM  

devildog123: Well, to be fair, the salad and baloney loaf was a WWII thing, trying to use as few rationed products as possible.  Look up some of the baked goods recipies from that era, trying to substitue a lot.  Also, today we take for granted a lot of the rapid shipping of produce that let's you get fresh looking produce in Minnisota in January, for a relatively decent price.  Back in those days, if stuff was out of season, you either bought canned, did without, or paid triple for stuff that looked like it would go bad by dinner.  Thus lots of heavy dressings, and bright, shiny gels to cover it up.  Year round access to fresh foods is a relatively new thing for most parts of the country.


Hail to the truck farmer!

Worship the truck farmer at the church of your choice.
 
2014-01-05 10:58:09 AM  

crab66: "Listen guys, fruit and mayonnaise is never a good idea. Ever."


http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/waldorf_salad/


I stand by that assertion. Waldorf salad is way better without the mayonnaise (especially if you replace it with a crumbly cheese, but even without any dairy at all).
 
2014-01-05 11:01:29 AM  
I hope this isn't considered spam[1], but there's a series of books by James Lileks which consider all manner of curious food from the 40s-60s.

(I share little of Lilek's POV and none of his money, but he has an accurate eye for the lapses of our parents and grandparents. I think he'd fit in easily at Fark.)

[1] unavoidable coincidence.
 
2014-01-05 11:04:33 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: I grew up using Miracle Whip as a salad dressing. Not just tuna salad & egg salad, but green salads too. My grandma's idea of a green salad was iceberg lettuce, tomatoes & occasionally some cut up spring onions if those were available, all slathered in Miracle Whip. I was in my late teens before I ever had another type of dressing on green salad & that was at a friend's home.


Miracle Whip is disgusting and vile.

And I like mayonnaise.
 
2014-01-05 11:15:18 AM  
All these recipes become super healthy by substituting fat-free and/or sugar-free versions of the main ingredients and adding a sprinkle of chow mein noodles.
 
2014-01-05 11:24:58 AM  

highwayrun: Paging Mr. James Lileks to a white courtesy phone, Mr. James Lileks to a white courtesy phone.


I don't care for him personally, but he has some funny compilations from that period, including 70's decorating nightmares.
 
2014-01-05 11:25:34 AM  

some_beer_drinker: [i.huffpost.com image 640x836]
lol, wut?


Is this what you'd be served at Don Draper's house?
 
2014-01-05 11:26:22 AM  

yakmans_dad: I hope this isn't considered spam[1], but there's a series of books by James Lileks which consider all manner of curious food from the 40s-60s.

(I share little of Lilek's POV and none of his money, but he has an accurate eye for the lapses of our parents and grandparents. I think he'd fit in easily at Fark.)

[1] unavoidable coincidence.


Or you could just go here.
 
2014-01-05 11:29:53 AM  

JonZoidberg: In the south, there's a salad still served today called pear salad.  It's a lettuce leaf topped with a canned pear half topped with a dollop of mayo and shredded cheese.  I find it's pretty good if you cut it up and get a little of everything in each bite.  Also canned peaches are used, but I've never tried it.


My mom still serves this sometimes!  Canned pears are so different from fresh they are like another food altogether.  Not the way I cook, but it feels like home...
 
2014-01-05 11:40:30 AM  
"We don't just want to get in better shape, we're actually desperate for the taste of  freshfruits and vegetables."

Yeah, that's known as 'what happens in the middle of winter'.

/Getting hit with that craving pretty hard lately
//Can't get fresh fruits and veggies easily in a food desert, especially when your dad thinks 'doing the shopping' means 'buying a few ingredients for special meals and nothing else'.
 
2014-01-05 11:44:29 AM  

highwayrun: Paging Mr. James Lileks to a white courtesy phone, Mr. James Lileks to a white courtesy phone.


And he was much funnier.
 
2014-01-05 11:46:33 AM  

Odoriferous Queef: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Odoriferous Queef: Confabulat: I find the idea of Miracle Whip as salad dressing pretty hysterical. And horrifying.

Same here.  Speaking of Miracle Whip, I had an Aunt that loved fried Spam sammiches made with Wonder bread and Miracle Whip.

*shudder*

Ummm, that does not sound that bad.

Love me some Spam from time to time.

I too require the occasional input of Spam.  It's the Miracle Whip  and that aerated goo they call Wonder Bread that is off putting.


You'd be surprised. It actually works.
 
2014-01-05 12:15:26 PM  

crab66: "Listen guys, fruit and mayonnaise is never a good idea. Ever."


http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/waldorf_salad/



When I was growing up my grandma made a good-sized bowl of that for every Thanksgiving & Christmas dinner, but she used Miracle Whip instead of mayo & there was no lettuce. She finally stopped making it in my late teens, but I think that was only because she & maybe one or two other relatives would even eat the stuff and most of it eventually ended up going bad & thrown in the garbage.
 
2014-01-05 12:24:55 PM  

vinniethepoo: JonZoidberg: In the south, there's a salad still served today called pear salad.  It's a lettuce leaf topped with a canned pear half topped with a dollop of mayo and shredded cheese.  I find it's pretty good if you cut it up and get a little of everything in each bite.  Also canned peaches are used, but I've never tried it.

I recall having eaten something similar but with cottage cheese instead of shredded cheese/mayo. I forget where: probably the school cafeteria.


Cottage cheese served in a canned pear or peach half is one of those things you don't see everyday, but it isn't uncommon.

You tend to find it as a side or a desert where old people like to eat.

But really, canned peach half with large curd cottage cheese sprinkled with cracked black pepper - so good. In fact, canned peaches just went on the shopping list.
 
2014-01-05 12:35:27 PM  
...and yet people were skinny back in the 50's before the advent of all the new 'low fat' foods.
 
2014-01-05 12:38:37 PM  
Now you know what they mean when a fatties says "all I had was a salad for lunch".
 
2014-01-05 12:47:47 PM  
I can't believe I'm the first to share this:

http://www.lileks.com/institute/gallery/index.html
 
2014-01-05 12:49:09 PM  
Damn it. Missed the link just upstream. I blame the cat for sitting on the keyboard and blipping over many entries. Yeah, that's it.
 
2014-01-05 01:17:42 PM  

JonZoidberg: In the south, there's a salad still served today called pear salad.  It's a lettuce leaf topped with a canned pear half topped with a dollop of mayo and shredded cheese.  I find it's pretty good if you cut it up and get a little of everything in each bite.  Also canned peaches are used, but I've never tried it.


I live in Colorado, and as a kid in the 1960's my mom served that. Not bad actually. Canned pears taste better than fresh pears IMO.
 
2014-01-05 02:04:13 PM  
My grandmother used to make green jello salad filled with (maraschino) cherries and celery every Christmas. Bleh.  I still hate celery to this day.

/Miracle Whip is "dressing" as in salad dressing.  Can't stand that stuff either.
 
2014-01-05 02:06:06 PM  
I want Rocky Mountain Oysters.
 
2014-01-05 02:09:59 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: ...and yet people were skinny back in the 50's before the advent of all the new 'low fat' foods.


Getting fat off of the foods in TFA would require being able to eat (and keep down) enough thereof.

/not sure I'd be capable, myself
//the 'everything is gross' diet?
 
2014-01-05 02:18:40 PM  
Almost all of these look more like advertising for the products in the recipes than dishes people would actually buy. I'm picturing a few Don Draper types sitting around a board room, looking at some disgusting glob of white substance going how the fark are we going to sell that?

They called in some secretary to write a few recipes they could publish in ladies' magazines, called it a day, and went out to get drunk and bed broads.

Now, decades later, people think people ate shiat like this back then. Oh, I'm sure some naive 18- or 19-year old bride made these once or twice over the years, but I don't think anybody ever had a second bite of any of them. All because of some lazy, boozy, whoring admen.
 
2014-01-05 02:21:45 PM  

yakmans_dad: I hope this isn't considered spam[1], but there's a series of books by James Lileks which consider all manner of curious food from the 40s-60s.

(I share little of Lilek's POV and none of his money, but he has an accurate eye for the lapses of our parents and grandparents. I think he'd fit in easily at Fark.)

[1] unavoidable coincidence.


James Lileks is actually registered here on Fark. Though I've never seen him post. He probably doesn't come here at all becuase you are all assholes.
 
2014-01-05 02:37:04 PM  
I remember this kind of food as a child - it would have been considered "fancy" in our house. Lots of moms in our area in the Midwest cooked a LOT of casseroles.

Hubby and I are just sitting down to enjoy one of our college favorites - hotdogs wrapped in canned biscuits. Cheaper than Spam back in the day.
 
2014-01-05 02:44:51 PM  
Oh, and Waldorf salad?  Hated that stuff as a kid - love it now.  I don't use much real mayo, but there has to be just a bit (not Miracle Whip).  As a kid, any combination of fruit and cheese made me gag. Dad to this day has a canned peach or pear half on top of cottage cheese for dessert, and I still can't stand it. He's also the king of apple pie with cheese.  (hork)
 
2014-01-05 02:58:45 PM  

new_york_monty: Almost all of these look more like advertising for the products in the recipes than dishes people would actually buy.


So what you are saying is that you have no idea how cookbooks originated in America?
 
2014-01-05 03:04:57 PM  

chitownmike: new_york_monty: Almost all of these look more like advertising for the products in the recipes than dishes people would actually buy.

So what you are saying is that you have no idea how cookbooks originated in America?


Most of the early German-American cookbooks in my cupboard start out with things like slaughter a chicken, or grind the flour coarsely. It wasn't until the early 20th century that they started naming branded products for recipes. The admen took over cookbooks quite early, but they didn't originate them.
 
2014-01-05 03:08:02 PM  

angiemama: I remember this kind of food as a child - it would have been considered "fancy" in our house. Lots of moms in our area in the Midwest cooked a LOT of casseroles.

Hubby and I are just sitting down to enjoy one of our college favorites - hotdogs wrapped in canned biscuits. Cheaper than Spam back in the day.


Mmmm....I have always loved the hot dog/canned dough combo. It was always crescent dough at my house, but I'm sure the biscuits are great, too. Add a slice of cheddar to the mix and then we're REALLY talking.

If you ever find yourself in Texas, you should try a sausage kolache. It's the same idea as a pig in a blanket, but it's made with sausage (often spicy) and a very mildly sweet, soft dough with a crispy exterior. It's the perfect breakfast food.
 
2014-01-05 03:29:56 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-05 03:49:36 PM  

devilskware: James Lileks is actually registered here on Fark. Though I've never seen him post. He probably doesn't come here at all becuase you are all assholes.


Well, he is something of a self-important right-wing blowhard, so there's that.
 
2014-01-05 03:51:18 PM  

chitownmike: So what you are saying is that you have no idea how cookbooks originated in America?


1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-05 03:54:45 PM  

new_york_monty: chitownmike: new_york_monty: Almost all of these look more like advertising for the products in the recipes than dishes people would actually buy.

So what you are saying is that you have no idea how cookbooks originated in America?

Most of the early German-American cookbooks in my cupboard start out with things like slaughter a chicken, or grind the flour coarsely. It wasn't until the early 20th century that they started naming branded products for recipes. The admen took over cookbooks quite early, but they didn't originate them.


I have an original Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking School cookbook, 1896, passed down from my great grandmother.
 
2014-01-05 04:09:33 PM  

JonZoidberg: In the south, there's a salad still served today called pear salad.  It's a lettuce leaf topped with a canned pear half topped with a dollop of mayo and shredded cheese.  I find it's pretty good if you cut it up and get a little of everything in each bite.  Also canned peaches are used, but I've never tried it.


Pacific NW here, my sister's mom would serve cottage cheese (small curd only) on a leaf of iceberg lettuce with either a pineapple ring, a peach half or pear half with a dollop of Miracle Whip.
 
2014-01-05 04:20:20 PM  

Choestoe: I can't believe I'm the first to share this:

http://www.lileks.com/institute/gallery/index.html



Actually you are the third (or fourth) to leave a post about him.
 
2014-01-05 04:43:41 PM  

mike_d85: SpdrJay: When I was a kid we had dandelion greens slathered in 10W40 as salad and we liked it!

10W40?! You were spoiled. We just got 4 drops of 4-in-1 and if we asked for a fifth, we went to bed without dinner.


Luxury!
 
2014-01-05 04:58:45 PM  

theorellior: devilskware: James Lileks is actually registered here on Fark. Though I've never seen him post. He probably doesn't come here at all becuase you are all assholes.

Well, he is something of a self-important right-wing blowhard, so there's that.


He'd fit right in here. Probably too well.
 
2014-01-05 05:05:46 PM  
Not to mention iceberg lettuce has pretty much zero nutrition.
 
2014-01-05 05:47:15 PM  

bratface: JonZoidberg: In the south, there's a salad still served today called pear salad.  It's a lettuce leaf topped with a canned pear half topped with a dollop of mayo and shredded cheese.  I find it's pretty good if you cut it up and get a little of everything in each bite.  Also canned peaches are used, but I've never tried it.

Pacific NW here, my sister's mom would serve cottage cheese (small curd only) on a leaf of iceberg lettuce with either a pineapple ring, a peach half or pear half with a dollop of Miracle Whip.


Same here only sans the MW.  She called it "diet food".
 
2014-01-05 06:56:29 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Odoriferous Queef: Confabulat: I find the idea of Miracle Whip as salad dressing pretty hysterical. And horrifying.

Same here.  Speaking of Miracle Whip, I had an Aunt that loved fried Spam sammiches made with Wonder bread and Miracle Whip.

*shudder*

Ummm, that does not sound that bad.

Love me some Spam from time to time.


You forgot the melted american cheese on the fried Spam...that was a typical lunch visiting grandmom
 
2014-01-05 07:02:51 PM  

Thingster: vinniethepoo: JonZoidberg: In the south, there's a salad still served today called pear salad.  It's a lettuce leaf topped with a canned pear half topped with a dollop of mayo and shredded cheese.  I find it's pretty good if you cut it up and get a little of everything in each bite.  Also canned peaches are used, but I've never tried it.

I recall having eaten something similar but with cottage cheese instead of shredded cheese/mayo. I forget where: probably the school cafeteria.

Cottage cheese served in a canned pear or peach half is one of those things you don't see everyday, but it isn't uncommon.

You tend to find it as a side or a desert where old people like to eat.

But really, canned peach half with large curd cottage cheese sprinkled with cracked black pepper - so good. In fact, canned peaches just went on the shopping list.


I like cottage cheese with fresh-ground black pepper, garlic powder and a dash of soy sauce stirred in. No fruit involved. It may sound gross but it's actually quite tasty that way. Now I have a craving for cottage cheese, but unfortunately it's one of the few things you can't find here: the Philippines isn't exactly dairy country. Even milk is found only in canned and powdered forms, imported from Australia or New Zealand. We can get cheese (though it's normally a processed cheeselike thing rather than real cheese, although the real thing can be found too), yogurt and ice cream but that's about all. Not even any sour cream to be found here. :(
 
2014-01-05 07:02:57 PM  

i upped my meds-up yours: theorellior: devilskware: James Lileks is actually registered here on Fark. Though I've never seen him post. He probably doesn't come here at all becuase you are all assholes.

Well, he is something of a self-important right-wing blowhard, so there's that.

He'd fit right in here. Probably too well.


Since I remember none of his politics except for the fact that he's considered a right winger, I feel free to defend him, at least on the grounds that he can be very funny. Laughter can cover a multitude of sins.
 
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