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(The Register)   Remember your first calculator? Here are 9 more that are so 1.618033989   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 98
    More: Spiffy, square roots, tangents, trigonometry, cosines, calculators, chronologies  
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4598 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jan 2014 at 9:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-04 03:24:50 PM  
=( I miss my first calculator.  It was a large, fat, cumbersome Ti-30 with the "Math on keys" handbook.  It had a light blue carrying case that was designed to be strapped to your BELT LOOP!  If you were a nerd, and you weren't "Packing 30" you were wrong.  You would have been aghast at the power consumption of it- it'd burn through a 9 volt battery in 24 hours of operation.  (Texas instruments claimed 30- horseshiat, if you were taking a test and have it die would YOU trust that extra 5 or 6 hours?)
 
2014-01-04 04:02:21 PM  
GBGEEOBIGI?

I don't get it.
 
2014-01-04 05:21:36 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: I don't get it.


Had to google it myself. Reminds me of that old film strip from elementary school.
 
2014-01-04 05:38:42 PM  
remember credit card calculators, and watch calculators, ruler calculators, too. good times
 
2014-01-04 05:48:42 PM  

Trailltrader: =( I miss my first calculator.  It was a large, fat, cumbersome Ti-30 with the "Math on keys" handbook.  It had a light blue carrying case that was designed to be strapped to your BELT LOOP!  If you were a nerd, and you weren't "Packing 30" you were wrong.  You would have been aghast at the power consumption of it- it'd burn through a 9 volt battery in 24 hours of operation.  (Texas instruments claimed 30- horseshiat, if you were taking a test and have it die would YOU trust that extra 5 or 6 hours?)


TI30. I loved it. I felt so smart.

I tucked the reciept into the battery door so I'd always remember how much I spent for it. I was such a geek!
 
2014-01-04 05:49:56 PM  
www.vintage-calc.info
 
2014-01-04 06:05:43 PM  
www.hpmuseum.org
 
2014-01-04 06:28:05 PM  
5318008
 
2014-01-04 08:20:09 PM  
education.ti.com

Yes, you are getting old.
 
2014-01-04 08:49:26 PM  
Five pages?  Thank you, no.
 
2014-01-04 09:16:40 PM  
I still have the Casio fx-81 my father gave me in 1980 (high school grad gift).
 
2014-01-04 09:23:25 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

My first calculator - grew up in China. Didn't own an electronic one until I moved to the US.
 
2014-01-04 09:47:34 PM  
For High School:
upload.wikimedia.org

Then moved to an HP for college:
www.hpcalc.org
 
2014-01-04 09:49:23 PM  
My first calculator was a TI-86 I got as a birthday present when I was 17. 16 years later I still use it just about everyday.

/electrical engineer
//no, I'm not going to use an HP
///reverse Polish notation is farking stupid
 
2014-01-04 09:50:21 PM  
thehomemakershelper.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-01-04 09:50:59 PM  
www.datamath.org
 
2014-01-04 09:51:49 PM  
The first one I ever did any real work on.  This thing was badass.  Had it for years until the ex destroyed it in a fit of jealous rage.  Yes, that's how much I loved that thing.
www.hpmuseum.org
 
2014-01-04 09:55:11 PM  
www.vintagecalculators.com

Still have it
 
2014-01-04 10:01:08 PM  
I had a HP-80, it actually took a second or two to give its answer. I used to think there was a pixie inside working the sums out for me.
 
2014-01-04 10:01:12 PM  

Nilatir: For High School:
[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x340]

Then moved to an HP for college:
[www.hpcalc.org image 386x862]


I had the 48SX.  We were allowed to use calculators for the final exam in Chemistry so I added the periodic table expansion card to mine.  It practically took the test for me.  Professor was 77 years old, had no clue modern (for the early 90's) high end calculators could do that.
 
2014-01-04 10:05:14 PM  
I still have my 1975-vintage Hewlett Packard 25. Reverse Polish Notation FTW!
 
2014-01-04 10:07:21 PM  
HP 15C

/hands dead cold
 
2014-01-04 10:08:27 PM  

Nilatir: For High School:


Then moved to an HP for college:


Exactly the same. Though I mostly use bc these days.
 
2014-01-04 10:09:24 PM  
My dad had the TI 30 and gave it to me for junior high, where it was stupidly over-powered. It also freaked people out by using reverse Polish notation....  I remember the keys had a very positive and satisfying "klik" sound.

Dad also had a sinclair with a  white case and red LED's that looked purple thru the tinted lens cover. That one had a simple lunar lander game on it that was very boring, as it was all numerical and not at all "flashy".

Isaac Asimov used to crow that he first described an LED-display pocket calculator in a story from the 30's or 40's... but he was also apologetic that when it came to recording devices, he totally blew it... or did he? His description of a press conference had reporters using single-handed fist-sized type-writers to type transcripts of what was happening in a press conference, using chorded keys.  He said it didn't even occur to him that future cameras and recording devices would advance as fast as they did, and in his day, a TV camera would weigh about 40 pounds and be the size of a 30-inch CRT.  Come to think of it, the typing on a mini keyboard seems like people tweeting today... so maybe he didn't really miss it after all.
 
2014-01-04 10:15:11 PM  

kimwim: [www.vintage-calc.info image 243x400]


That was mine, too. You never forget your first!
 
2014-01-04 10:19:06 PM  
school.discoveryeducation.com
 
2014-01-04 10:21:44 PM  
I had some obscure graphing calculator (do not remember what it was) in high school, and I programmed a simple Monopoly game into it.  This was mid 90s.  I was writing handheld apps before it was cool.

Don't even own a calculator today.
 
2014-01-04 10:26:09 PM  
This monster got me through grad school, but the form factor was horrible:

img607.imageshack.us

It did do a pretty good job of solving equations by variables instead of just calculating numbers.  It's my understanding that since it has a full keyboard the SAT board ruled it a computer that couldn't be used on tests, which killed the market for it.  Real men took the SAT before they let you pussy out and use a programmable calculator on it.

I still have that calculator.  It's slow as balls these days, but it was a real revolution when it came out.
 
2014-01-04 10:33:42 PM  
I had the TI-35 Plus for my first real calculator... I never fully taxed it, but I loved it.  My parents bought it for me my sophomore year in HS (87) and I used it all the way through college.  It did not do very well in the interim years.... entropy and several moves seem to have done it in and I was unable to bring it to life about a year ago when I dug it back out to keep in my tool box.
 
2014-01-04 10:37:16 PM  

Any Pie Left: My dad had the TI 30 and gave it to me for junior high, where it was stupidly over-powered. It also freaked people out by using reverse Polish notation....  I remember the keys had a very positive and satisfying "klik" sound.

Dad also had a sinclair with a  white case and red LED's that looked purple thru the tinted lens cover. That one had a simple lunar lander game on it that was very boring, as it was all numerical and not at all "flashy".

Isaac Asimov used to crow that he first described an LED-display pocket calculator in a story from the 30's or 40's... but he was also apologetic that when it came to recording devices, he totally blew it... or did he? His description of a press conference had reporters using single-handed fist-sized type-writers to type transcripts of what was happening in a press conference, using chorded keys.  He said it didn't even occur to him that future cameras and recording devices would advance as fast as they did, and in his day, a TV camera would weigh about 40 pounds and be the size of a 30-inch CRT.  Come to think of it, the typing on a mini keyboard seems like people tweeting today... so maybe he didn't really miss it after all.


No one in Asimov's generation really nailed it with their sci-fi on purpose. What they did was INSPIRE kids in college to become engineers by showing how advanced technology MIGHT be applied to fulfill roles we all dreamed of. Look at how movies like The Terminator and video games like Doom have inspired engineers for decades to be working on an HUD system for daily life, like Google Glass. That has nothing to do with technology and everything to do with I'd like to see circles around them when I'm looking for my car keys.
 
2014-01-04 10:42:06 PM  
a.tgcdn.net
 
2014-01-04 10:43:25 PM  
"Big green numbers, and little rubber feet!"

// earworm
 
2014-01-04 10:50:14 PM  

schnee: HP 15C

/hands dead cold


That thing will outlast you. I've got one 30+ years old that has been left out in the rain, dropped on to concrete from 3 stories up, generally abused all it's life... it will not die.

/Equals keys are for people with short stacks.
 
2014-01-04 10:50:51 PM  
Still have it. Last time I put 4AA batteries in it, still worked.

img.fark.net
 
2014-01-04 10:53:52 PM  
I had the Casio FX-550
and I remember that darn calc watch.

/still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea...
 
2014-01-04 10:55:36 PM  

Trailltrader: =( I miss my first calculator.  It was a large, fat, cumbersome Ti-30 with the "Math on keys" handbook.  It had a light blue carrying case that was designed to be strapped to your BELT LOOP!  If you were a nerd, and you weren't "Packing 30" you were wrong.  You would have been aghast at the power consumption of it- it'd burn through a 9 volt battery in 24 hours of operation.  (Texas instruments claimed 30- horseshiat, if you were taking a test and have it die would YOU trust that extra 5 or 6 hours?)


I liked the TI-30 so much I bought two of them so I'd have one at work and one at home.
I still have them.
The Math on Keys book was fantastic, too. I memorized the (rather long) formula for calculating time payments, and amused myself by finding blatant lies in car dealers' ads.
 
2014-01-04 10:55:50 PM  

kimwim: [www.vintage-calc.info image 243x400]


Blast from my past.
 
2014-01-04 10:57:29 PM  

albert71292: Still have it. Last time I put 4AA batteries in it, still worked.

[img.fark.net image 339x519]


Haha that's my Dad's calculator from the 70s/80s
 
db2
2014-01-04 10:58:44 PM  
The HP 28C was a joke. You couldn't do squat with 2KB of RAM in that bulky OS. The 28S made it usable, but nothing will top the 48SX/GX. NOTHING.
 
2014-01-04 11:05:17 PM  

eltejon: I had the TI-35 Plus for my first real calculator... I never fully taxed it, but I loved it.  My parents bought it for me my sophomore year in HS (87) and I used it all the way through college.  It did not do very well in the interim years.... entropy and several moves seem to have done it in and I was unable to bring it to life about a year ago when I dug it back out to keep in my tool box.


My mom got a TI-35 Plus for college. 20 years later I had to use it when one of my physics banned graphing calculators from class. The 7 stopped working one day and I popped the batteries. It had the original Union Carbide batteries. Replaced them and it still works.


Lsherm: This monster got me through grad school, but the form factor was horrible:

[img607.imageshack.us image 817x480]

It did do a pretty good job of solving equations by variables instead of just calculating numbers.  It's my understanding that since it has a full keyboard the SAT board ruled it a computer that couldn't be used on tests, which killed the market for it.  Real men took the SAT before they let you pussy out and use a programmable calculator on it.

I still have that calculator.  It's slow as balls these days, but it was a real revolution when it came out.


I always wanted one of those, and even though I could just buy one today I think I can do everything by hand or with a spread sheet and linear algebra. I see they go for less than $30 on eBay.

Actually, what I really want is Mathematica. If I had stupid money to blow I'd probably get back into that, without that silly student edition single processor core restriction. I've got 8 cores, and I want to fire on all cylinders.
 
2014-01-04 11:05:44 PM  

eltejon: I had the TI-35 Plus for my first real calculator... I never fully taxed it, but I loved it.  My parents bought it for me my sophomore year in HS (87) and I used it all the way through college.  It did not do very well in the interim years.... entropy and several moves seem to have done it in and I was unable to bring it to life about a year ago when I dug it back out to keep in my tool box.


I was given a TI-35 for Christmas, my senior year of high school. It disappeared that day, and I found it 10 days later, in the back yard, in a foot of snow, with dog-chew marks all over it. I dried it out, and it fired right up. The case was destroyed, but the calculator worked just fine. I still have it.
 
2014-01-04 11:21:54 PM  
max_pooper:
///reverse Polish notation is farking stupid

RPN is the shiznit!!!
 
2014-01-04 11:25:28 PM  
I ENTER
still ENTER
love ENTER
Reverse ENTER
Polish ENTER
Notation ENTER
+ + + + +
 
2014-01-04 11:26:36 PM  
I still have my HP-41CV.  Awesome calculator.
 
2014-01-04 11:29:33 PM  
I had this bad boy when I was ten. I think I was the only kid in class to have a calculator.

img593.imageshack.us

/Also had one of the first digital watches, the LED Timex one you had to pres a button to see the time.
 
2014-01-04 11:34:07 PM  

serial_crusher: getting o


Still perfect.
 
2014-01-04 11:46:18 PM  
www.azom.com
 
2014-01-04 11:46:54 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-01-04 11:50:15 PM  

Local Man: I ENTER
still ENTER
love ENTER
Reverse ENTER
Polish ENTER
Notation ENTER
+ + + + +


The HP-41C duplicates the entry if you hit ENTER and don't start another entry. Also, it's stack is only four deep and also duplicates the oldest item on the stack as you perform operations.  So your exampleresults in "ReverseReverseReversePolishNotationNotation".

I have way too much time invested in that calculator. :D
 
2014-01-04 11:51:15 PM  

wildcardjack: Actually, what I really want is Mathematica. If I had stupid money to blow I'd probably get back into that, without that silly student edition single processor core restriction. I've got 8 cores, and I want to fire on all cylinders.


Yeah, it's $2495 for a personal edition that could use eight cores.  We hand out a full version to our engineering/math students at the university I work at, but it's tied to a licensing server.  Actually, I think everything we have that is of any value is tied to a licensing server, and it's a pain in the farking ass.  All of the users can't seem to understand that they have to be on campus or on a VPN for numerous products to work, primarily because most licensing servers for academic/secientific software don't have any farking authentication mechanisms.  If we opened them up to the world, anyone could use it.

Seriously, I just started this job and I'm appalled at the archaic infrastructure required to utilize most of the software our researchers are using.  It's like most companies developed a licensing infrastructure during the days of LAN-only labs and just never bothered to develop a better way of doing it.
 
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