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(io9)   Remember the 'Milgram Experiment' during which participants were made to think they were shocking someone to death? Yeah, about that   (io9.com) divider line 66
    More: Interesting, Milgram experiment, human subject research  
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7905 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jan 2014 at 8:49 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



66 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-03 09:00:41 PM
Milgram is not a meme.
 
2014-01-03 09:03:57 PM
Screw you?
 
2014-01-03 09:06:47 PM
What about the people who just liked electrocuting things?
 
2014-01-03 09:13:45 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: What about the people who just liked electrocuting things?


Shockingly enough, they complied with the least resistance.
 
2014-01-03 09:14:37 PM
Cool thing is...most people aren't sadistic assholes...
 
2014-01-03 09:16:04 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: What about the people who just liked electrocuting things?


We call them "cops" now and give them tasers.
 
2014-01-03 09:16:12 PM

Sugarbombs: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: What about the people who just liked electrocuting things?

Shockingly enough, they complied with the least resistance.


"You can stop now. The experiment is over."

"No, that's okay. I want to keep going."
 
2014-01-03 09:16:33 PM
We do what we're told.
 
2014-01-03 09:18:19 PM
LOL...most of  us  folks want to get hurt...a little...that keeps the whole pony ride going
 
2014-01-03 09:22:48 PM
Cool thing is (beatings)  that we human beings tend to resist what we have been told...especially if it smells of tyranny
 
2014-01-03 09:27:03 PM
the social psychology experiments from the sixties were the only reason to love social psychology
 
2014-01-03 09:38:07 PM
The absolute irony is that  the Milgram  experiments involved absolute obedience to authority. Any likely commenter on Fark would pleasantly surprise me by not being an absolute mockingbird to authority or popular culture.
 
2014-01-03 09:38:32 PM

tjraff01: the social psychology experiments from the sixties were the only reason to love social psychology


That, robbers cave, and the stanford prison experiment were a hoot. Too bad you can't pass any of that stuff past a committee now.
 
2014-01-03 09:38:39 PM

tjraff01: LOL...most of  us  folks want to get hurt...a little...that keeps the whole pony ride going


"fark is not your personal erotica site"
 
2014-01-03 09:39:48 PM
Robbers cave made me a fan of psychology...back when cool experiments could be conducted
 
2014-01-03 09:40:49 PM
I remember playing one round of a prisoner's dilemma for five bucks against a psych major for an experiment . the look on his face when I didn't do the optimal thing and cooperate was priceless. Like two bucks would have been worth my time or the zero if we both didn't.
 
2014-01-03 09:45:27 PM
most social psych research nowadays has to be questionnaire stuff
 
2014-01-03 09:49:36 PM
It's just good that most people are decent (and I'm not joking, you cynical monkeys :))
 
2014-01-03 09:49:43 PM
One time I started an Internet company called Spacebook so I could collect user data and sell it to the government and other companies.

I was amazed at the number of people who signed up for it willingly and submitted all their life data for me to sell and profit from.
 
2014-01-03 09:55:20 PM
Absolutely,  Fano...the social psych experiments from the 60's (which would never fly now) got me into psychology in the 1990's
 
2014-01-03 10:00:14 PM

tjraff01: Cool thing is (beatings)  that we human beings tend to resist what we have been told...especially if it smells of tyranny


i love the smell of tyranny in the morning.
 
2014-01-03 10:00:47 PM
I don't think I'd make a good lab rat for most experiments.  I think I would play the meta-game too much and figure out what is actually being measured.  With the shock experiment stuff, my internal bullshiat alarm would sound, because this isn't the Third Reich.
 
2014-01-03 10:02:51 PM

Myria: I don't think I'd make a good lab rat for most experiments.  I think I would play the meta-game too much and figure out what is actually being measured.  With the shock experiment stuff, my internal bullshiat alarm would sound, because this isn't the Third Reich.



"Hey, your shock thing wasn't actually hooked up, these guys were just screaming in pretend, so I fixed the wiring for you!"


/I like being helpful
//And zapping people
 
2014-01-03 10:03:20 PM
the strange thing is that professional (practiced) psychology is all about genuineness, authenticity, and trying to reflect on what actually is occurring...fark  is going to have a field day with that
 
2014-01-03 10:12:29 PM
fark is going to eat it alive, lol
 
2014-01-03 10:17:46 PM
This is an unpopular thread. Ladies,  could you light it up a bit?
 
2014-01-03 10:23:21 PM
I think you may need to go flirt with some younger men
 
2014-01-03 10:29:01 PM
And all I wanted to do was hook up with some other reminiscent psychology majors. Lord help us.
 
2014-01-03 10:30:04 PM
Tjraff01

For someone so brimming with comments, you might want to read the details of the Milgram experiments.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2013/10/02/the-shocking-truth- o f-the-notorious-milgram-obedience-experiments/#.Usd_A6NdXJs

And

http://www.npr.org/2013/08/28/209559002/taking-a-closer-look-at-milgr a ms-shocking-obedience-study
 
2014-01-03 10:31:54 PM
They are awful, Smack...this is why I am proud not to have had anything to do with em
 
2014-01-03 10:32:25 PM

Fano: I remember playing one round of a prisoner's dilemma for five bucks against a psych major for an experiment . the look on his face when I didn't do the optimal thing and cooperate was priceless. Like two bucks would have been worth my time or the zero if we both didn't.


Aww, you are so special.

/pats fano on the head
 
2014-01-03 10:34:38 PM
There are those who study human nature in order to try to help folks...then there are those who study human nature in order to try to scam folks
 
2014-01-03 10:36:12 PM

tjraff01: They are awful, Smack...this is why I am proud not to have had anything to do with em


Read the links.
They aren't nearly the revealing of humans as terrible things that you think.
 
2014-01-03 10:37:57 PM
People play...in the most essential motive force...we do not harm
 
2014-01-03 10:39:49 PM

tjraff01: People play...in the most essential motive force...we do not harm


Are you high?
 
2014-01-03 10:40:35 PM
dang, feller
 
2014-01-03 10:42:46 PM
you messin with me, Smack? Don't make me go Colorado on ya.
 
2014-01-03 10:51:39 PM
We have some very decent vendors here in louisiana (no dope required)
 
2014-01-03 10:52:49 PM
Fant's is some heavenly seafood
 
2014-01-03 10:53:25 PM

Smackledorfer: Fano: I remember playing one round of a prisoner's dilemma for five bucks against a psych major for an experiment . the look on his face when I didn't do the optimal thing and cooperate was priceless. Like two bucks would have been worth my time or the zero if we both didn't.

Aww, you are so special.

/pats fano on the head


I never did figure out what the researchers learned from people playing just one round of a prisoner's dilemma with little at stake learned. That earnest people will be suckers who think it's supposed to come out like the textbook says and people who don't care about anything but satisfying one of their experiment credits will blow it off?
 
2014-01-03 10:57:28 PM
I think it comes down to religion, Fano. If you are serious about your stake and are "all in," then you are Christian :). If you are confused, then you  are confused.
 
2014-01-03 11:14:57 PM

tjraff01: Absolutely,  Fano...the social psych experiments from the 60's (which would never fly now) got me into psychology in the 1990's


I would have loved to be part of one of those kick ass experiments from social psych back in the day. Unfortunately, all I ever did was do surveys, memorize and repeat strings of numbers, estimate the length of poles at various distances, and one time answered an interview about sex, drugs, and alcohol wearing alternatively an angel puppet and a devil puppet. And the lightning round prisoner's dilemma. I didn't mean to sound condescending about it, but the broken look of "this wasn't how it was supposed to go down because I know we both read the same textbook" was funny.
 
2014-01-03 11:22:28 PM
Well, sure you can do the Milgram experiment.

You just have to turn it into a French game show with an audience demanding blood. (Far as I can tell, that experiment resulted in more people going all the way on the dial than any other iteration of Milgram.)
 
2014-01-03 11:24:34 PM

Fano: tjraff01: Absolutely,  Fano...the social psych experiments from the 60's (which would never fly now) got me into psychology in the 1990's

I would have loved to be part of one of those kick ass experiments from social psych back in the day. Unfortunately, all I ever did was do surveys, memorize and repeat strings of numbers, estimate the length of poles at various distances, and one time answered an interview about sex, drugs, and alcohol wearing alternatively an angel puppet and a devil puppet. And the lightning round prisoner's dilemma. I didn't mean to sound condescending about it, but the broken look of "this wasn't how it was supposed to go down because I know we both read the same textbook" was funny.


The experiment I ran was basically seeing is people could learn paper rock scissors in 100 tries with foreign symbols at a computer.

You got shown two, picked one, and were told if correct or incorrect.

Well, only about one in five picked up the pattern. It was so painful to watch student after student fail so miserably.

One left me with the following: "I think the symbol on the left is supposed to be the winner, but it wins about half the time"

/shudder
 
2014-01-03 11:28:37 PM

Fano: tjraff01: Absolutely,  Fano...the social psych experiments from the 60's (which would never fly now) got me into psychology in the 1990's

I would have loved to be part of one of those kick ass experiments from social psych back in the day. Unfortunately, all I ever did was do surveys, memorize and repeat strings of numbers, estimate the length of poles at various distances, and one time answered an interview about sex, drugs, and alcohol wearing alternatively an angel puppet and a devil puppet. And the lightning round prisoner's dilemma. I didn't mean to sound condescending about it, but the broken look of "this wasn't how it was supposed to go down because I know we both read the same textbook" was funny.


I had a good one in my undergrad time. Naturally, it was one of those "Be a test monkey for extra credit in Psych 201" things, so I'm not exactly breaking new ground. Subjects were shown various pictures of unpleasant scenes (rotting garbage, fecal encrusted toilets, roadkill, dead bodies, etc) alternated with pleasant scenes (flowers, fresh food, small children playing, etc) and given a button. We were told that the button moved the slide forward and we should press it when the unpleasantness registered with us. A few slides go by with normal clicking, but I noticed lag in the responses - I've played enough games to recognize a delay independent of my controller, so I started testing it. Rapid clicks, no change. No clicks, change. It was clear to me that I didn't actually control the progression, so I decided to engage in the proudest of traditions: Screwing with data.

I like to think that as the numbers of clicks were being analyzed that there was one serious outlier. "So, this subject LIKED the rotten toilet but clicked over 60 times when apple pie was shown?"
 
2014-01-04 12:14:34 AM

tjraff01: I think it comes down to religion, Fano. If you are serious about your stake and are "all in," then you are Christian :). If you are confused, then you  are confused.


You are amazing. Post more comments. You alone have the power to light Fark on fire.
 
2014-01-04 01:03:39 AM

tjraff01: The absolute irony is that  the Milgram  experiments involved absolute obedience to authority.


The interesting thing is that they showed exactly the opposite of what people think it showed.  When the people were *ordered* to continue shocking the other person, they refused.
 
2014-01-04 02:09:32 AM

tjraff01: Cool thing is...most people aren't sadistic assholes...


They're just willing to shock people to death when the sadistic assholes of the world tell them so.... at least if the assholes appear to be in charge and say they'll take full responsibility.
 
2014-01-04 02:15:57 AM

tjraff01: the social psychology experiments from the sixties were the only reason to love social psychology


They're what got me interested in psychology. Milgram and Stanford are my two favorites.
 
2014-01-04 02:57:09 AM
Short version: psychology is 99% bullshiat.
 
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