If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Post)   NSA's quantum computer could be threat to cryptography, expensive failure, or both at the same time   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 27
    More: Interesting, NSA, quantum, quantum computer, line coding, quantum superpositions, quantum information processing, space researches, electrical engineering and computer science  
•       •       •

1002 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jan 2014 at 11:25 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-03 11:28:12 AM  
Where did my cat go? Oh well, I suppose it doesn't matter.
 
2014-01-03 11:36:32 AM  
Yawn, Shor's Algorithm (the quantum algorithm for solving integer factorization in polynomial time) was formulated in 1994 and everyone has been trying to build a quantum computation device to run it since.  This is nothing new.
 
2014-01-03 11:38:01 AM  
Well, we won't know for sure until we check.
 
2014-01-03 11:44:42 AM  
It's a threat to some cryptographic methods, but not all.

And for those that it is a threat to, they have side-channel attacks that can defeat most of it anyway.
 
2014-01-03 11:49:58 AM  
Now that my friends is how you get a headline greened. Good show sub.
 
2014-01-03 11:54:16 AM  
What's the record for 'MORE" links?
 
2014-01-03 11:55:11 AM  
Two things you hear from physicists every year;

1)cold fusion blah blah blah
2) quantum computer is almost here and will be so powerful....

Neither will ever happen.
 
2014-01-03 12:01:14 PM  
We have to keep reminding it where it is.
 
2014-01-03 12:03:36 PM  

spentshells: Now that my friends is how you get a headline greened. Good show sub.


I simultaneously did and did not understand the headline.

/Analog computers- the wave of the future!
 
2014-01-03 12:40:57 PM  
All cool computers have a name. They should call it "Heisenberg."

/biatches
 
2014-01-03 12:45:41 PM  
as someone on slashdot pointed out the whole program costs about half a F-22 so it's not really that expensive.
 
2014-01-03 12:46:19 PM  

stuhayes2010: Two things you hear from physicists every year;

1)cold fusion blah blah blah
2) quantum computer is almost here and will be so powerful....

Neither will ever happen.


... No? I'm pretty sure most physicists realize *COLD* fusion is likely a pipe dream.

They do talk about FUSION frequently, and there's a large scale fusion plant being built in France, set to go online... sometime in the 2020's, I think? (SOme have suspected that it may just be a matter of scale-if I recall correctly, for tokamak reactors, the energy produced goes up as the cube (volume) while the energy to contain it/keep the reaction going goes up by the square (surface area), but I may be misremembering, I'm not a nuclear physicist.)

dittybopper: It's a threat to some cryptographic methods, but not all.

And for those that it is a threat to, they have side-channel attacks that can defeat most of it anyway.


Yeah, properly created and used one-time pads are still completely impenetrable.

Of course, the key word is 'properly used'. I suspect if people started using one-time-pads, some idiots would commit the cardinal sin of cryptography and re-use one.
 
2014-01-03 12:48:56 PM  
Quantum computing is neither here nor there.
 
2014-01-03 12:50:26 PM  
I think I'll invent a new digital currency, the Qubitcoin.

It exists in superposition in your digital wallet, both there and not there.

Until you try to spend it.
 
2014-01-03 12:56:19 PM  
but what does "Seatec Astronomy" mean?
 
2014-01-03 12:59:04 PM  

Nefarious: but what does "Seatec Astronomy" mean?


A telescope company operating in the Seattle-Tacoma area of Washington, owned by people who can't spell
 
2014-01-03 01:36:53 PM  

Felgraf: dittybopper: It's a threat to some cryptographic methods, but not all.

And for those that it is a threat to, they have side-channel attacks that can defeat most of it anyway.

Yeah, properly created and used one-time pads are still completely impenetrable.

Of course, the key word is 'properly used'. I suspect if people started using one-time-pads, some idiots would commit the cardinal sin of cryptography and re-use one.


Probably, but that can be mitigated by using paper pads.

You make just two copies, and once you've used them, you burn them so they can't be re-used.   Since each person knows the other person is going to destroy their page once it's used, there is no reason to try and re-use a page.

The Russians did re-use pad pages, but that was likely because of the problems of generating key pads during war-time, and shipping them all over the world.  Even so, it took decades for the US to fully exploit it.  It would naturally be faster today.

Plus, you can re-use pad pages *IF* you use them in conjunction with other methods.  A repeating key combined with transposition and fractionation can be very (though not perfectly) secure.
 
2014-01-03 01:40:38 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-03 01:44:01 PM  

dittybopper: The Russians did re-use pad pages, but that was likely because of the problems of generating key pads during war-time, and shipping them all over the world.  Even so, it took decades for the US to fully exploit it.


I should point out that even with pad re-use by the Soviets, the US only was able to decode a very small percentage of the messages sent.
 
2014-01-03 02:11:52 PM  

dittybopper: dittybopper: The Russians did re-use pad pages, but that was likely because of the problems of generating key pads during war-time, and shipping them all over the world.  Even so, it took decades for the US to fully exploit it.

I should point out that even with pad re-use by the Soviets, the US only was able to decode a very small percentage of the messages sent.


Oh, aye, but it does make it *breakable*, and does technically open up the same weaknesses that the Viginere cipher has.

/God I loved my cryptography class in undergrad
//One of the take home midterm problems was "Here's a vigenere ciphertext. BREAK IT."
///"Okay, so toying with the 'coincidences' and assuming a key size of X, frequency analysis is getting me this chunk of text as... Br**l*g? The hell? I can't even think of a word, or words next to each other, that would ha-... ... That's brillig, isn't it. She used the jabberwocky as plaintext. That is both evil and hysterical."
 
2014-01-03 02:25:52 PM  
Quantum Computer. Much Uncertainty. So Powerful. Not Yet. Free Cat.
 
2014-01-03 02:30:32 PM  

dittybopper: Felgraf: dittybopper: It's a threat to some cryptographic methods, but not all.

And for those that it is a threat to, they have side-channel attacks that can defeat most of it anyway.

Yeah, properly created and used one-time pads are still completely impenetrable.

Of course, the key word is 'properly used'. I suspect if people started using one-time-pads, some idiots would commit the cardinal sin of cryptography and re-use one.

Probably, but that can be mitigated by using paper pads.

You make just two copies, and once you've used them, you burn them so they can't be re-used.   Since each person knows the other person is going to destroy their page once it's used, there is no reason to try and re-use a page.

The Russians did re-use pad pages, but that was likely because of the problems of generating key pads during war-time, and shipping them all over the world.  Even so, it took decades for the US to fully exploit it.  It would naturally be faster today.

Plus, you can re-use pad pages *IF* you use them in conjunction with other methods.  A repeating key combined with transposition and fractionation can be very (though not perfectly) secure.


So the solution to secure communication is a big one-time pad.  A really big one time pad.

*dons sunglasses*
You might say...
A maxi-pad.

/I hope there are no leaks.
 
2014-01-03 02:32:53 PM  

theborg1of4: Where did my cat go? Oh well, I suppose it doesn't matter.


We need to invent and disinvent the Heisenberg compensator.

img2.timeinc.net
 
2014-01-03 03:19:38 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: I think I'll invent a new digital currency, the Qubitcoin.

It exists in superposition in your digital wallet, both there and not there.

Until you try to spend it.


Sounds like an ATM card.
 
2014-01-03 04:17:23 PM  
Oh boy...

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2014-01-03 07:38:13 PM  

Felgraf: dittybopper: dittybopper: The Russians did re-use pad pages, but that was likely because of the problems of generating key pads during war-time, and shipping them all over the world.  Even so, it took decades for the US to fully exploit it.

I should point out that even with pad re-use by the Soviets, the US only was able to decode a very small percentage of the messages sent.

Oh, aye, but it does make it *breakable*, and does technically open up the same weaknesses that the Viginere cipher has.

/God I loved my cryptography class in undergrad
//One of the take home midterm problems was "Here's a vigenere ciphertext. BREAK IT."
///"Okay, so toying with the 'coincidences' and assuming a key size of X, frequency analysis is getting me this chunk of text as... Br**l*g? The hell? I can't even think of a word, or words next to each other, that would ha-... ... That's brillig, isn't it. She used the jabberwocky as plaintext. That is both evil and hysterical."


Fark can be like that sometimes:

http://www.fark.com/comments/7928839/If-you-can-crack-this-code-you- co uld-be-next-James-Bond-AWVLI-QIQVT-QOSQO-ELGCV-IIQWD-LCUQE-EOENN-WWOAO -LTDNU-QTGAW-TSMDO-QTLAO-QSDCH-PQQIQ-DQQTQ-OOTUD-BNIQH-BHHTD-UTEET-FDU EA-UMORE-SQEQE-MLTME-TIREC-LICAI-QATUN-QRALT-ENEIN-RKG

If you want, you can skip ahead to the part where I cracked it:

http://www.fark.com/comments/7928839/86420069#c86420069
 
2014-01-03 08:18:25 PM  

whither_apophis: All cool computers have a name. They should call it "Heisenberg."



Ya God Damn Right!!!
 
Displayed 27 of 27 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report