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(International Business Times)   If you discount the few short minutes when they were buried alive in molten lava, the life of the people of Pompeii was actually pretty sweet   (ibtimes.co.uk) divider line 72
    More: Interesting, Pompeii, social relations, cuts of meat  
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6406 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Jan 2014 at 1:57 PM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-02 12:57:13 PM
Technically, they were buried in volcanic ash and pumice, not molten lava.  Had they been buried in molten lava, pretty much nothing would have been left.
 
2014-01-02 01:15:22 PM
I'm guessing the odd giraffe leg was from an animal killed in a gladiatorial (or other entertainment) event for an uber-rich man, and its carcass butchered and sold on the black market.  Just a guess.
 
2014-01-02 01:21:40 PM
A popular side dish or condiment for Pompeiians was garum, a kind of fish sauce made from sea salt and fermented fish intestines. The smell, as you can imagine, was said to be pretty foul.

However it's pretty obvious the ancient Romans loved the stuff; there is hardly a street in Pompeii that doesn't have a garum shop. I for one will settle for a good steak or perhaps some buffalo wings; hold the garum.
 
2014-01-02 01:25:13 PM
FTFA: "That the bone represents the height of exotic food is underscored by the fact that this is thought to be the only giraffe bone ever recorded from an archaeological excavation in Roman Italy,"

The article's headline makes it sound like they had a Giraffee-fil-A on every corner.
 
2014-01-02 01:35:55 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: I'm guessing the odd giraffe leg was from an animal killed in a gladiatorial (or other entertainment) event for an uber-rich man, and its carcass butchered and sold on the black market.  Just a guess.


It was a gay giraffe.
 
2014-01-02 01:37:31 PM

gilgigamesh: A popular side dish or condiment for Pompeiians was garum, a kind of fish sauce made from sea salt and fermented fish intestines. The smell, as you can imagine, was said to be pretty foul.

However it's pretty obvious the ancient Romans loved the stuff; there is hardly a street in Pompeii that doesn't have a garum shop. I for one will settle for a good steak or perhaps some buffalo wings; hold the garum.


Actually we think it was more like nam pla or nuoc mam fish sauce and probably delicious when used in cooked dishes.
 
2014-01-02 01:47:51 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: gilgigamesh: A popular side dish or condiment for Pompeiians was garum, a kind of fish sauce made from sea salt and fermented fish intestines. The smell, as you can imagine, was said to be pretty foul.

However it's pretty obvious the ancient Romans loved the stuff; there is hardly a street in Pompeii that doesn't have a garum shop. I for one will settle for a good steak or perhaps some buffalo wings; hold the garum.

Actually we think it was more like nam pla or nuoc mam fish sauce and probably delicious when used in cooked dishes.


It was used as a condiment, not a staple, so yeah.
 
2014-01-02 01:48:35 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: gilgigamesh: A popular side dish or condiment for Pompeiians was garum, a kind of fish sauce made from sea salt and fermented fish intestines. The smell, as you can imagine, was said to be pretty foul.

However it's pretty obvious the ancient Romans loved the stuff; there is hardly a street in Pompeii that doesn't have a garum shop. I for one will settle for a good steak or perhaps some buffalo wings; hold the garum.

Actually we think it was more like nam pla or nuoc mam fish sauce and probably delicious when used in cooked dishes.


I once saw a documentary that said some forms were probably akin to Worcestershire sauce.  Apparently, and not completely surprisingly, there were as many garum recipes as there were people who made it.
 
2014-01-02 02:01:12 PM

dittybopper: Technically, they were buried in volcanic ash and pumice, not molten lava.  Had they been buried in molten lava, pretty much nothing would have been left.


I thought it was  Pyroclastic_flow or was that Herculaneum?
 
2014-01-02 02:01:15 PM

dittybopper: Technically, they were buried in volcanic ash and pumice, not molten lava.  Had they been buried in molten lava, pretty much nothing would have been left.


I came here to point that out.  :-)

/Hmmmm... giraffe!
 
2014-01-02 02:02:57 PM

MrBallou: FTFA: "That the bone represents the height of exotic food is underscored by the fact that this is thought to be the only giraffe bone ever recorded from an archaeological excavation in Roman Italy,"

The article's headline makes it sound like they had a Giraffee-fil-A on every corner.


A misleading headline? On MY Fark? It's more likely than you think...
 
2014-01-02 02:05:42 PM
Pompeii got buried by the ash, Herculaneum got the pyroclastic flow
 
2014-01-02 02:05:47 PM
www.bbc.co.uk
 
2014-01-02 02:07:49 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: gilgigamesh: A popular side dish or condiment for Pompeiians was garum, a kind of fish sauce made from sea salt and fermented fish intestines. The smell, as you can imagine, was said to be pretty foul.

However it's pretty obvious the ancient Romans loved the stuff; there is hardly a street in Pompeii that doesn't have a garum shop. I for one will settle for a good steak or perhaps some buffalo wings; hold the garum.

Actually we think it was more like nam pla or nuoc mam fish sauce and probably delicious when used in cooked dishes.


Yeah, but I think gilgigamesh was talking about how it smelled, not how it tasted. It may have tasted great, but the smell was bad enough that production of the stuff was mostly banned in the cities. You had to make it on the outskirts, and then cart it in.
 
2014-01-02 02:08:28 PM

Snort: dittybopper: Technically, they were buried in volcanic ash and pumice, not molten lava.  Had they been buried in molten lava, pretty much nothing would have been left.

I thought it was  Pyroclastic_flow or was that Herculaneum?


That was Pompeii, it was  Herculaneum that was buried in lava...

Vesuvius, meanwhile, sits quietly while Naples grows around it, biding its time. March will be the 70th anniversary of its last eruption.

/CSB: my Grandfather, part of the American forces occupying Campania, was part of an Army Air Force reconnaissance mission that flew around the erupting volcano
 
2014-01-02 02:09:12 PM
If only The Doctor had saved them!

speakgeekytome.com
 
2014-01-02 02:09:13 PM
Hehe.  My buddy did 2 tours in the Iraq.  He told me this story him and his squad came upon a zoo in the middle of nowhere.  It was completely abandoned of people, but the animals were still there.  They were very hungry so they had to decide which animal to kill for food.  They went with giraffe.  He said it was super gamy and tough.
 
2014-01-02 02:12:10 PM
Well, if you think what happened to Pompeii was bad, wait till you hear what happened to Herculanium.

You know that GIF from the movie Scanners of the dude's head exploding? That actually happened there.
 
2014-01-02 02:12:57 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-02 02:13:11 PM
Pretty sweet, except for the filth, stink, sweat, and disease. Those famous Roman baths had no way to clean or sterilize the water. You'd come out filthier than when you went in. I love the ancient Romans and study them for a living, but give me modern science and medicine any day.
 
2014-01-02 02:17:08 PM
Lower-class Romans where not the true lower class.  I am sure the lives of their slaves kind of sucked even before the eruption.
 
2014-01-02 02:17:29 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: I'm guessing the odd giraffe leg was from an animal killed in a gladiatorial (or other entertainment) event for an uber-rich man, and its carcass butchered and sold on the black market.  Just a guess.


It wasn't a black market. The animals used in games were subsequently used for food. Only makes sense.
 
2014-01-02 02:17:54 PM

dittybopper: Technically, they were buried in volcanic ash and pumice, not molten lava.  Had they been buried in molten lava, pretty much nothing would have been left.


Came here to say this.
 
2014-01-02 02:19:01 PM
They probably really pissed off their plumbers throwing giraffe leg bones and such in the drains.
 
2014-01-02 02:23:19 PM

Scaevola: Pretty sweet, except for the filth, stink, sweat, and disease. Those famous Roman baths had no way to clean or sterilize the water. You'd come out filthier than when you went in. I love the ancient Romans and study them for a living, but give me modern science and medicine any day.


Yeah, when you're in Pompeii, you really get a sense of how crowded the city must have been. Lots of the houses would put modern "microhouses" to shame. And it's funny walking around and listening to the tourists speculate about the two trenches on the side of the roads. "Oh, these must have been for cart wheels." When actually they were for people to throw their shiat in.
 
2014-01-02 02:24:46 PM

TheMysteriousStranger: Lower-class Romans where not the true lower class.  I am sure the lives of their slaves kind of sucked even before the eruption.


It depended. Roman slavery covered everything from Greek-speaking secretaries, highly valued chefs, and palace functionaries who could expect to retire as freedmen, to galley and mine slaves who were largely condemned criminals. The freeborn poor could have it worse than a rich man's slaves.
 
2014-01-02 02:26:39 PM

Scaevola: Pretty sweet, except for the filth, stink, sweat, and disease. Those famous Roman baths had no way to clean or sterilize the water. You'd come out filthier than when you went in. I love the ancient Romans and study them for a living, but give me modern science and medicine any day.


You said it, Lefty.
 
2014-01-02 02:27:03 PM
subby: If you discount the few short minutes when they were buried alive in molten lava, the life of the people of Pompeii was actually pretty sweet

I guess you're gonna be the optimist in all this.
 
2014-01-02 02:27:17 PM
I love lava lamp.
 
2014-01-02 02:28:50 PM

jigger: Benevolent Misanthrope: I'm guessing the odd giraffe leg was from an animal killed in a gladiatorial (or other entertainment) event for an uber-rich man, and its carcass butchered and sold on the black market.  Just a guess.

It wasn't a black market. The animals used in games were subsequently used for food. Only makes sense.


I was thinking black market because it was so exotic.  The rich guy would have eaten it (whether or not it was killed in games), I would think - but his cook probably sold a haunch of it to make some cash on the side.  I mean, seriously - no dinner party is going to finish an entire giraffe.  It may well have been an uneaten portion that was cooked at the rich guy's kitchen first, then sold to a restaurant as leftovers.
 
2014-01-02 02:31:29 PM

jigger: Benevolent Misanthrope: I'm guessing the odd giraffe leg was from an animal killed in a gladiatorial (or other entertainment) event for an uber-rich man, and its carcass butchered and sold on the black market.  Just a guess.

It wasn't a black market. The animals used in games were subsequently used for food. Only makes sense.


Yeah, you don't want to just throw that delicious giraffe away now, but the days of leftovers gets kind of tiring: Giraffe stew, Giraffe sandwiches, Giraffe ala King, etc.
 
2014-01-02 02:34:42 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: I was thinking black market because it was so exotic. The rich guy would have eaten it (whether or not it was killed in games), I would think - but his cook probably sold a haunch of it to make some cash on the side. I mean, seriously - no dinner party is going to finish an entire giraffe. It may well have been an uneaten portion that was cooked at the rich guy's kitchen first, then sold to a restaurant as leftovers.


I'm not exactly sure on this point in time, but in Greek sacrifices, the meat from sacrificial animals (and the Romans farking loved to sacrifice exotic animals like giraffes) was shared with the less fortunate, the gods taking  the inedible parts.This idea made its way into Roman, like a lot of Greek religion.
 
2014-01-02 02:35:35 PM
Now I want to watch Pink FLoyd Live At Pompeii
 
2014-01-02 02:42:15 PM

gilgigamesh: A popular side dish or condiment for Pompeiians was garum, a kind of fish sauce made from sea salt and fermented fish intestines. The smell, as you can imagine, was said to be pretty foul.

However it's pretty obvious the ancient Romans loved the stuff; there is hardly a street in Pompeii that doesn't have a garum shop. I for one will settle for a good steak or perhaps some buffalo wings; hold the garum.


Hom haHum ha
biatches.
 
2014-01-02 02:43:10 PM
Well, who's fault is it that they didn't duck and cover from the lava?

img.fark.net
 
2014-01-02 02:43:32 PM

KingKauff: Now I want to watch Pink FLoyd Live At Pompeii


It melts if you drop acid or not
 
2014-01-02 02:44:20 PM

TheMysteriousStranger: Lower-class Romans where not the true lower class.  I am sure the lives of their slaves kind of sucked even before the eruption.


That's besides the point
 
2014-01-02 03:01:46 PM
static2.wikia.nocookie.net

Stan, you know, Grossman.
 
2014-01-02 03:02:33 PM

KingKauff: Now I want to watch Pink FLoyd Live At Pompeii


My wife got pretty pissed off at me because I dragged her on a "death march" (her words) across the town to see that stadium solely for that reason.

It was raining, it was much farther than I expected it to be, and when I got there, it was pretty anticlimactic. Except for the sense of deja vu I got standing in the place, I admit the time it took to trudge all the way across Pompeii to get to it could have been better spent.
 
2014-01-02 03:04:40 PM
The lave had done far worse than kill them.  It hurt them.
4.bp.blogspot.com
And it wished to go on hurting them.
 
2014-01-02 03:05:04 PM
Came for the Peter Capaldi and Doctor Who references.

Leaving happy.
 
2014-01-02 03:13:16 PM

Scaevola: Pretty sweet, except for the filth, stink, sweat, and disease. Those famous Roman baths had no way to clean or sterilize the water. You'd come out filthier than when you went in. I love the ancient Romans and study them for a living, but give me modern science and medicine any day.


We had an in-ground swimming pool one summer when I was a kid. It takes experience, the right chemicals, and good water pumps to  keep water clean. To hedge his bets, my father used around 400% of the recommended  amount of chlorine instead. I'm surprised we survived or look like sightless cave fish.
 
2014-01-02 03:14:02 PM
one of my past lives was spent in Pompeii (though well before 79 AD) and it was very nice.  good times
 
2014-01-02 03:19:42 PM

MadMattressMack: Well, who's fault is it that they didn't duck and cover from the lava?

[img.fark.net image 464x352]


failposters.com
 
2014-01-02 03:21:39 PM
Even though the lava thing is false, why does subby think that it would take "a few minutes"? Lava is pretty goddamn hot, to say the least. I doubt you'd even feel it if a wave of lava rolled over you.
 
2014-01-02 03:22:03 PM

LeroyBourne: Hehe.  My buddy did 2 tours in the Iraq.  He told me this story him and his squad came upon a zoo in the middle of nowhere.  It was completely abandoned of people, but the animals were still there.  They were very hungry so they had to decide which animal to kill for food.  They went with giraffe.  He said it was super gamy and tough.


I find it surprising all the animals worked together to take down a giraffe. How did they even get out of their cages to do it?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-02 03:23:00 PM
I read an article claiming death would have been instantaneous due to "fulminant shock." Later, I looked up fulminant shock and found it had nothing to do with being smothered in hot ash. So it's unclear whether ash immersion is a better or worse death than being chased off a cliff by a pack of naked women.
 
2014-01-02 03:23:38 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: Benevolent Misanthrope: I'm guessing the odd giraffe leg was from an animal killed in a gladiatorial (or other entertainment) event for an uber-rich man, and its carcass butchered and sold on the black market.  Just a guess.

It was a gay giraffe.

4.bp.blogspot.com


Approves
 
2014-01-02 03:24:55 PM

Scaevola: Pretty sweet, except for the filth, stink, sweat, and disease. Those famous Roman baths had no way to clean or sterilize the water. You'd come out filthier than when you went in. I love the ancient Romans and study them for a living, but give me modern science and medicine any day.


Except, of course, for the whole "boiling" thing.
 
2014-01-02 03:26:25 PM

MythDragon: LeroyBourne: Hehe.  My buddy did 2 tours in the Iraq.  He told me this story him and his squad came upon a zoo in the middle of nowhere.  It was completely abandoned of people, but the animals were still there.  They were very hungry so they had to decide which animal to kill for food.  They went with giraffe.  He said it was super gamy and tough.

I find it surprising all the animals worked together to take down a giraffe. How did they even get out of their cages to do it?


You know I never asked how he was able to communicate with all the animals.  I'll have to ask next time him and I hang out.
 
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