If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Universe Today)   NASA's Curiosity rover marks New Year's Day on Earth and her 500th Sol (that is a Martian day) on Mars with awesome photo of 18,000 foot high Mount Sharp: "Goals for 2014: Finish driving to Mars' Mount Sharp & do all the science I can"   (universetoday.com) divider line 62
    More: Spiffy, Mount Sharp, New Year's Day on Earth, NASA, interplanetary mission, Mars Time, Long-distance track event, clay minerals, raw images  
•       •       •

4423 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Jan 2014 at 9:34 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



62 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-01-01 06:33:02 PM
*Insert obligatory sad XKCD comic here*
 
2014-01-01 06:50:22 PM
Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.
 
2014-01-01 07:02:17 PM

antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.


I know.  It is almost as if we were unable to plan for every conceivable variable in an incredibly harsh environment with technology that was lucky to even make it to Mars and then operate for the past 16 or so months.  What a failure.
 
2014-01-01 07:05:14 PM
Whar pic of tall mountain? Whar?
 
2014-01-01 07:29:37 PM
I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.
 
2014-01-01 07:55:32 PM

Demetrius: I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.


And the Cassini pics from Saturn a couple of days ago.  Just amazing.
 
2014-01-01 08:14:07 PM

John Buck 41: Whar pic of tall mountain? Whar?


Mt. Sharp doesn't look very sharp to me.
 
2014-01-01 09:05:09 PM

rickythepenguin: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

I know.  It is almost as if we were unable to plan for every conceivable variable in an incredibly harsh environment with technology that was lucky to even make it to Mars and then operate for the past 16 or so months.  What a failure.


Really? That is your reaction to my post?
 
2014-01-01 10:06:34 PM

John Buck 41: Whar pic of tall mountain? Whar?


That is how Mars mountains look, they look squashed and almost hilly like even if they're very tall. Mount Sharp for example is comparable in size to this mountain
Mt Saint Elias for example. Yet, that looks like a mountain and Mount Sharp looks like a dusty hill.

 upload.wikimedia.org

A better example is Olympus Mons, its the largest mountain in the solar system and yet it looks like you could just gradually walk up it. Compared to say Everest.
 
2014-01-01 10:07:09 PM
Just look at that sharp mountain.  That's way below my standards.
 
2014-01-01 10:09:52 PM
A rather big milestone is coming up to: Opportunity will have landed 10 years ago on the 24th. It's 90 sol journey could become longer than a 3555 sol journey.
 
2014-01-01 10:11:12 PM
How many sols would a woodsol sol if a woodsol could sol wood?
 
2014-01-01 10:25:24 PM

rickythepenguin: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

I know.  It is almost as if we were unable to plan for every conceivable variable in an incredibly harsh environment with technology that was lucky to even make it to Mars and then operate for the past 16 or so months.  What a failure.


I've got teabagger relatives that were derping about a year ago about how that thing was a giant failure and waste of taxpayer money, because it only has a 1 megapixel camera.  Pfft, this here free cell phone has a better camera, so that's the best NASA can do with billions of our hard earned dollars.

Best part?  One of them is a retired engineer, so he's well aware of how planning and execution of large scale projects works.  He's also aware of the type of hardening that needs to happen to electronics before they can survive such environments. He's also aware of how many years it had probably been since the spec was written for how the camera would interface with the rest of the system, and what was available at the time to prototype and test.

Willful Prideful ignorance.  There's no point in arguing with people like that.
 
2014-01-01 10:31:27 PM
Holy crap, all I did was state how shocked/amazed I was that the martian surface did so much damage to the wheels after such a short distance. Next time they probably won't use aluminum for the wheels.
 
2014-01-01 10:33:36 PM

urger: *Insert obligatory sad XKCD comic here*


imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-01-01 10:36:56 PM
Why is a Martian day a sol? Do they have different names for days on every planet?
 
2014-01-01 10:38:27 PM

Demetrius: I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.


check out  http://www.distancetomars.com to have your mind blown.
 
2014-01-01 10:41:26 PM

bbfreak: John Buck 41: Whar pic of tall mountain? Whar?

That is how Mars mountains look, they look squashed and almost hilly like even if they're very tall. Mount Sharp for example is comparable in size to this mountain
Mt Saint Elias for example. Yet, that looks like a mountain and Mount Sharp looks like a dusty hill.

 [upload.wikimedia.org image 700x452]

A better example is Olympus Mons, its the largest mountain in the solar system and yet it looks like you could just gradually walk up it. Compared to say Everest.


Yeah, it's tough to get a sense of how truly large those mountains are from the ground since everything is so gradual and there's nothing next to it to serve as a reference. Olympus Mons doesn't seem that huge until you also view from above and realize that it would cover Utah.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-01-01 11:10:28 PM

wildcardjack: urger: *Insert obligatory sad XKCD comic here*

[imgs.xkcd.com image 740x201]


i3.kym-cdn.com
 
2014-01-01 11:21:41 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Why is a Martian day a sol? Do they have different names for days on every planet?


It would be a sol anywhere else, too.  Sol is the sun's name, and it counts local sunrises.  Here we have one sol every 24 hours and call it a day.

But the Martian day is about 40 minutes longer than Earth's, just long enough to be inconvenient.  Were it much shorter or much longer, we'd just have a day and night shift at JPL manning its transmissions and planning progress, but since it's sort of close to an Earth day, the Martian dayshift people change their Earth schedule to correspond to Mars's day.  So whenever sunrise is on Mars, those people start their "sol", even if it's in the middle of the night, which it will be every 5 weeks.
 
2014-01-01 11:51:37 PM
My grandkids are screwed.
 
2014-01-01 11:52:34 PM
Whoops.  Wrong thread.
 
2014-01-01 11:56:54 PM
urger

*Insert obligatory sad XKCD comic here*


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-02 12:13:47 AM

antidisestablishmentarianism: Holy crap, all I did was state how shocked/amazed I was that the martian surface did so much damage to the wheels after such a short distance. Next time they probably won't use aluminum for the wheels.


I think we can blame a certain user for their oversensitivity regarding space tech... Not naming any names, because that's against Fark ToS (where trolling for YEARS is not)
 
2014-01-02 12:43:52 AM

Iszael: ArcadianRefugee: Why is a Martian day a sol? Do they have different names for days on every planet?

It would be a sol anywhere else, too.  Sol is the sun's name, and it counts local sunrises.  Here we have one sol every 24 hours and call it a day.

But the Martian day is about 40 minutes longer than Earth's, just long enough to be inconvenient.  Were it much shorter or much longer, we'd just have a day and night shift at JPL manning its transmissions and planning progress, but since it's sort of close to an Earth day, the Martian dayshift people change their Earth schedule to correspond to Mars's day.  So whenever sunrise is on Mars, those people start their "sol", even if it's in the middle of the night, which it will be every 5 weeks.


See, that's what I thought. However:

Headline (admittedly not a great source): "...her 500th Sol (that is a Martian day) on Mars" indicates that a Sol is a Martian day. Better phrased, it should have read "her 500th sol on Mars (500 Martian days)". Was gonna point this out, visited dictionary.com (perhaps, given the current circumstances, also not the best source) and found this:

dictionary.com: "a solar day as measured on the planet Mars, equal to 24.65 hours". I suppose that's the reason I asked my question.

Then there's Wikipedia (cited):

"The term sol is used by planetary astronomers to refer to the duration of a solar day on Mars.[7]"

whose citation (NASA.gov) links to this explanation:

"...this stereo view of the rover's surroundings on the 959th sol, or Martian day...."


I always assumed "sol" meant (essentially) "On a given planetary body, time it takes to complete one rotation" but this all seemed to point to sol = 1 Martian day.

Now, I do recognize that the confusion may have started with NASA's phrasing above, in that it hints that the term applies to Mars solely, but I cannot find contradiction.
 
2014-01-02 01:13:24 AM
People now expect everything to be snark.


The wheel thing sucks.
 
2014-01-02 01:18:24 AM
Geez.  I was hoping to just not masturbate so much for 2014.  Thanks for setting the bar high, Curiosity.
 
2014-01-02 01:27:13 AM

antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.


It has disappointed me many times that we build these one or two at a time, one to send and maybe one to debug with. I find it hard to believe the cost of five Mars Lab missions is twice as expensive as the cost of the first one.
 
2014-01-02 01:38:59 AM

RoyBatty: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

It has disappointed me many times that we build these one or two at a time, one to send and maybe one to debug with. I find it hard to believe the cost of five Mars Lab missions is twice as expensive as the cost of the first one.


That's what I am waiting for: the first mission that dumps several, (roughly) identical probes all at the same time and just sends them scattering for data.
 
2014-01-02 02:06:20 AM

ArcadianRefugee: RoyBatty: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

It has disappointed me many times that we build these one or two at a time, one to send and maybe one to debug with. I find it hard to believe the cost of five Mars Lab missions is twice as expensive as the cost of the first one.

That's what I am waiting for: the first mission that dumps several, (roughly) identical probes all at the same time and just sends them scattering for data.


I recall reading a proposal to send a thing with about a dozen simple probes scurrying around collecting samples that they would then deliver to a central probe, which would run a series of rests on each sample. It was essentially little bobcat diggers or something that could scoop a sample. The central hub would also serves as a solar powered charging station.
 
2014-01-02 02:11:41 AM

r1niceboy: ArcadianRefugee: RoyBatty: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

It has disappointed me many times that we build these one or two at a time, one to send and maybe one to debug with. I find it hard to believe the cost of five Mars Lab missions is twice as expensive as the cost of the first one.

That's what I am waiting for: the first mission that dumps several, (roughly) identical probes all at the same time and just sends them scattering for data.

I recall reading a proposal to send a thing with about a dozen simple probes scurrying around collecting samples that they would then deliver to a central probe, which would run a series of rests on each sample. It was essentially little bobcat diggers or something that could scoop a sample. The central hub would also serves as a solar powered charging station.


All that would be cool, but what I really want is a factory pipeline here on earth, an industry that launches probes once every six months, using a standard but continuously improving platform gaining in experience, making turnaround faster, so that hell, the new curiosity or even just a jumbo spirit and opportunity might be sent out with martian quadcopters or some such shiat.

I liked the old faster, cheaper, leaner programs, but they fell into the same trap as the ones before that they could never tolerate 'splosions and failures.
 
2014-01-02 02:28:00 AM

twistedmetal: And the Cassini pics from Saturn a couple of days ago.  Just amazing.


Now I realize Saturn is just a naturally photogenic planet, but good lord those photos are awe inspiring.
 
2014-01-02 03:16:36 AM

The Why Not Guy: twistedmetal: And the Cassini pics from Saturn a couple of days ago.  Just amazing.

Now I realize Saturn is just a naturally photogenic planet, but good lord those photos are awe inspiring.


Good thing the libtards didn't get their way, or the whole works would have never gotten off the ground:

www.peacebuttons.info
 
2014-01-02 04:27:58 AM

bbfreak: John Buck 41: Whar pic of tall mountain? Whar?

That is how Mars mountains look, they look squashed and almost hilly like even if they're very tall. Mount Sharp for example is comparable in size to this mountain
Mt Saint Elias for example. Yet, that looks like a mountain and Mount Sharp looks like a dusty hill.

 

A better example is Olympus Mons, its the largest mountain in the solar system and yet it looks like you could just gradually walk up it. Compared to say Everest.


Everest is over commercialized and not the best example anymore.
 
2014-01-02 06:09:45 AM

rickythepenguin: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

I know.  It is almost as if we were unable to plan for every conceivable variable in an incredibly harsh environment with technology that was lucky to even make it to Mars and then operate for the past 16 or so months.  What a failure.


In several major ways it was.

The biggest failure is IT'S NOT SEARCHING FOR LIFE.

Thanks drill disinfection guy. Thanks a lot.
 
2014-01-02 07:22:19 AM

antidisestablishmentarianism: rickythepenguin: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

I know.  It is almost as if we were unable to plan for every conceivable variable in an incredibly harsh environment with technology that was lucky to even make it to Mars and then operate for the past 16 or so months.  What a failure.

Really? That is your reaction to my post?


I suspect Ricky might have just come from a climate change or circumcision thread. Maybe both.
 
2014-01-02 07:58:45 AM

bbfreak: John Buck 41: Whar pic of tall mountain? Whar?

That is how Mars mountains look, they look squashed and almost hilly like even if they're very tall. Mount Sharp for example is comparable in size to this mountain
Mt Saint Elias for example. Yet, that looks like a mountain and Mount Sharp looks like a dusty hill.

 [upload.wikimedia.org image 700x452]

A better example is Olympus Mons, its the largest mountain in the solar system and yet it looks like you could just gradually walk up it. Compared to say Everest.


I'd imagine the difference is mostly due to erosion. Everest would be one giant smooth hill if it wasn't for weather.
 
2014-01-02 08:27:09 AM

Demetrius: I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.


How about a picture from titan?

photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov


http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/imagedetails/index.cfm?imageId=18 81
 
2014-01-02 08:52:20 AM

Egoy3k: Demetrius: I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.

How about a picture from titan?

[photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov image 504x718]


http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/imagedetails/index.cfm?imageId=18 81


I talk a lot of shiat about NASA. Mainly because they don't release many pictures like this. I'm not even Lana Kane, but SPLOOSH.
 
2014-01-02 08:57:38 AM

ArcadianRefugee: RoyBatty: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

It has disappointed me many times that we build these one or two at a time, one to send and maybe one to debug with. I find it hard to believe the cost of five Mars Lab missions is twice as expensive as the cost of the first one.

That's what I am waiting for: the first mission that dumps several, (roughly) identical probes all at the same time and just sends them scattering for data.


Fast, cheap, and out of control.
 
2014-01-02 09:05:54 AM

r1niceboy: ArcadianRefugee: RoyBatty: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

It has disappointed me many times that we build these one or two at a time, one to send and maybe one to debug with. I find it hard to believe the cost of five Mars Lab missions is twice as expensive as the cost of the first one.

That's what I am waiting for: the first mission that dumps several, (roughly) identical probes all at the same time and just sends them scattering for data.

I recall reading a proposal to send a thing with about a dozen simple probes scurrying around collecting samples that they would then deliver to a central probe, which would run a series of rests on each sample. It was essentially little bobcat diggers or something that could scoop a sample. The central hub would also serves as a solar powered charging station.



It could be the personnel and equipment costs to support such a mission could be so high that it's not viable. Putting a dozen robots on Mars at the same time is not so far fetched. In these economic and political times, hiring the people and building all the "mission controls" needed is beyond feasible.

Just a guess.
 
2014-01-02 09:17:54 AM

doglover: Egoy3k: Demetrius: I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.

How about a picture from titan?

[photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov image 504x718]


http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/imagedetails/index.cfm?imageId=18 81

I talk a lot of shiat about NASA. Mainly because they don't release many pictures like this. I'm not even Lana Kane, but SPLOOSH.


The only reason I knew this picture exists was a Ted talk by one of the project members who was in tears when talking about it.  A combination of joy at getting to land (well controlled crash) a probe on Titan, anger at the public not giving a shiat, and awe about the surface conditions.
 
2014-01-02 09:38:17 AM

Egoy3k: The only reason I knew this picture exists was a Ted talk by one of the project members who was in tears when talking about it.


It's not the public's fault. NASA has shiat PR, America is a representative republic, and no one likes geology.

This means the sciences get stuck in a confluence of suck. They don't impress the politicians, who in turn cut the funding, causing them to stick to boring (cheap) geology missions, which turns the public off, which doesn't impress the politicians....

Look at all the support for Mars One. EVERYONE wants to go to Mars. Politicians hold the purse strings though. They're impressed by blowing up brown people. NASA isn't a weapons maker, though. So Lockeed Martin eats up NASA's lunch. Then they can't send people to Mars anymore. So, they send robots to do geology, which is boring as fark. In the meantime someone makes a MOAB, which is awesome, so funding get's cut again, and again, and again. In the end, we're left with Russia taking up Chris Hatfield and his guitar to play folk songs and talk to school kids in low earth orbit, which leads to even BIGGER budget cuts.

But when NASA finds that first alien life form, the money will never EVER stop for a generation or more.
 
2014-01-02 10:21:15 AM
Don't Troll Me Bro! [TotalFark]

I've got teabagger relatives that were derping about a year ago about how that thing was a giant failure and waste of taxpayer money, because it only has a 1 megapixel camera. Pfft,[//quote] Fark-libs where posting the same complaint (along with demanding we point the Hubble at the moon to prove the Apollo missions).

But go ahead and pretend this is a Right vs Left thing.
 
2014-01-02 10:23:21 AM
antidisestablishmentarianism [TotalFark]
2014-01-01 06:50:22 PM


Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

It's also shorting out like a motherfarker. We can't get current from point A to point B without farking it up, so I'm not surprised making round things is too hard for us.
 
2014-01-02 10:32:58 AM
OnlyM3:

You're gnashing your teeth so hard you can't even format a post. Time to calm down. Maybe try not being a dumb asshole for a week or so.
 
2014-01-02 10:36:11 AM

Egoy3k: doglover: Egoy3k: Demetrius: I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.

How about a picture from titan?

[photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov image 504x718]


http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/imagedetails/index.cfm?imageId=18 81

I talk a lot of shiat about NASA. Mainly because they don't release many pictures like this. I'm not even Lana Kane, but SPLOOSH.

The only reason I knew this picture exists was a Ted talk by one of the project members who was in tears when talking about it.  A combination of joy at getting to land (well controlled crash) a probe on Titan, anger at the public not giving a shiat, and awe about the surface conditions.


Yeah, I never knew of Huygens landing on Titan until I saw a documentary a couple years ago.
 
2014-01-02 10:43:34 AM
Not doing too bad for faking it on Mars...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHU67s5tOSA
 
2014-01-02 10:55:04 AM

Don't Troll Me Bro!: rickythepenguin: antidisestablishmentarianism: Still amazed at how little distance Curiosity has covered and how much damage has been done to the wheels in that short distance.

I know.  It is almost as if we were unable to plan for every conceivable variable in an incredibly harsh environment with technology that was lucky to even make it to Mars and then operate for the past 16 or so months.  What a failure.

I've got teabagger relatives that were derping about a year ago about how that thing was a giant failure and waste of taxpayer money, because it only has a 1 megapixel camera.  Pfft, this here free cell phone has a better camera, so that's the best NASA can do with billions of our hard earned dollars.

Best part?  One of them is a retired engineer, so he's well aware of how planning and execution of large scale projects works.  He's also aware of the type of hardening that needs to happen to electronics before they can survive such environments. He's also aware of how many years it had probably been since the spec was written for how the camera would interface with the rest of the system, and what was available at the time to prototype and test.

Willful Prideful ignorance.  There's no point in arguing with people like that.


Almost as little point in arguing with someone who casually tosses around homophobic slurs making light of sexual assault.
 
2014-01-02 11:26:20 AM

Seequinn: Demetrius: I'm constantly amazed that I'm looking at pictures from FARKING MARS.  Another planet. A bajillion miles from here (okay, maybe not that many). Just freaking amazing.

check out  http://www.distancetomars.com to have your mind blown.


Holy crap, space is huge amounts of mostly nothing. I knew it academically, but this helps translate it into something I can relate to.

Thanks for the link.
 
Displayed 50 of 62 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report