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(Rapid City Journal)   Airline CEO predictions: "Google's 'put me there' technology implemented into its maps software renders all airlines obsolete"   (rapidcityjournal.com) divider line 47
    More: Unlikely, CEO, software rendering, airlines obsolete, predictions, Virgin Atlantic Airways, maps, airlines, propulsion systems  
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2763 clicks; posted to Business » on 01 Jan 2014 at 6:35 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-01 04:08:00 PM  
So we will have teleporters?
 
2014-01-01 04:10:34 PM  
Not until Google figures out how to send your bags to the wrong city.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-01 04:16:37 PM  
A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.
 
2014-01-01 04:20:43 PM  
First-gen Google driverless cars will have this as an add-on to its Maps integration plugin, but it will be natively implemented in GoogleCRAFT Mark I.  So, it's more like twenty-five years, not one hundred.
 
2014-01-01 04:34:02 PM  

ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.


Except when you want to hold your newborn nephew or be there to soothe your gran's fear as she passes away.  Some things require human touch.
 
2014-01-01 04:38:38 PM  
- Mark Dunkerley, CEO Hawaiian Airlines: "Many of today's consumers will be priced out of the air: a sad legacy to 30 years of massive progress in democratizing air travel. Failure to invest in aviation infrastructure and the insatiable appetite for regulation will not be offset by relatively modest further improvements in aircraft efficiency."

"We want taxpayer dollars we just don't want anyone looking over our shoulders while we spend it."
 
2014-01-01 04:41:04 PM  

ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.


People will always want to travel and visit places.  That will never be taken away.
 
2014-01-01 05:02:43 PM  

Mentat: - Mark Dunkerley, CEO Hawaiian Airlines: "Many of today's consumers will be priced out of the air: a sad legacy to 30 years of massive progress in democratizing air travel. Failure to invest in aviation infrastructure and the insatiable appetite for regulation will not be offset by relatively modest further improvements in aircraft efficiency."

"We want taxpayer dollars we just don't want anyone looking over our shoulders while we spend it."


That could be applied to any recipient of taxpayer dollars - from the Banking industry down to people on public assistance.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-01 05:10:07 PM  
Benevolent Misanthrope

The need to touch distant people because they share DNA is Second Millenium thinking. Once the old people die off humanity will be rid of it.
 
2014-01-01 05:32:09 PM  
And everyone blames unions instead of management in the airline and auto industry for the problems they have
 
2014-01-01 05:37:14 PM  

ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.


Niven's flash crowds have been happening without transfer booths. Just had a floating riot at a mall in Brooklyn a couple weeks ago.
 
2014-01-01 05:39:40 PM  
He's confusing "obsolete" with "Greyhound bus lines".
 
2014-01-01 05:45:10 PM  
travelinksites.com

Yeah, just looking at it is enough. Why would I want to actually SWIM in it?
 
2014-01-01 05:46:38 PM  

ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.


And yet no one foresaw the foremost driver of 21st century communication technology.

Porn.

I predict that one of the great growth areas of study in the 21st century will be pornknowgraphy.
 
2014-01-01 06:10:44 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.

And yet no one foresaw the foremost driver of 21st century communication technology.

Porn.

I predict that one of the great growth areas of study in the 21st century will be pornknowgraphy.


Porn drives a lot of media innovation...  that person saying you can't hold your nephew above... I think in 40-50 years (maybe even sooner) it will be possible to do "virtually" in a way that feels so real that you will not be able to tell the difference physically, other than the fact that "mentally" you know you aren't there.... but, the innovation behind that technology will be because the virtual sex market made it possible.
 
2014-01-01 06:18:47 PM  

dletter: a lot of media innovation... that person saying you can't hold your nephew above... I think in 40-50 years (maybe even sooner) it will be possible to do "virtually" in a way that feels so real that you will not be able to tell the difference physically


Having a stroke is no way to go into the new year.
 
2014-01-01 06:53:41 PM  
But what about monsters from the id?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-01-01 07:03:24 PM  

SwiftFox: But what about monsters from the id?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 465x163]


Don't bring Carmack into this.
 
2014-01-01 07:07:22 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: And everyone blames unions instead of management in the airline and auto industry for the problems they have


That goes for every industry in which Union Thugs work.
 
2014-01-01 07:07:39 PM  
Porn has driven all innovations in media technology, back to the printing press. I know it's true because I read it on Cracked.
 
2014-01-01 07:09:28 PM  
Yeah, Google Street View is what'll run the airlines out of business.  The Incredible Shrinking Coach Seat will have nothing to do with it.
 
2014-01-01 07:23:13 PM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Peter von Nostrand: And everyone blames unions instead of management in the airline and auto industry for the problems they have

That goes for every industry in which Union Thugs work.


As a union thug, I do feel good about all the mean things I do
 
2014-01-01 07:27:48 PM  

Mentat: - Mark Dunkerley, CEO Hawaiian Airlines: "Many of today's consumers will be priced out of the air: a sad legacy to 30 years of massive progress in democratizing air travel. Failure to invest in aviation infrastructure and the insatiable appetite for regulation will not be offset by relatively modest further improvements in aircraft efficiency."

"We want taxpayer dollars we just don't want anyone looking over our shoulders while we spend it."


Moreover, it's like he's being willfully ignorant of all the regulations that have been stripped away since the 1980s.  At this point, if a new regulation gets put into place, it's only because one of his ilk really screwed the pooch and a few hundred people ended up dead.
 
2014-01-01 08:01:14 PM  

ZAZ: Benevolent Misanthrope

The need to touch distant people because they share DNA is Second Millenium thinking. Once the old people die off humanity will be rid of it.


Grandma doesn't need to hug Junior anymore, now that we have Skype.
 
2014-01-01 08:39:53 PM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Peter von Nostrand: And everyone blames unions instead of management in the airline and auto industry for the problems they have

That goes for every industry in which Union Thugs work.




Delta is surprisingly union free except for the pilots.
 
2014-01-01 09:16:08 PM  

Robo Beat: Mentat: - Mark Dunkerley, CEO Hawaiian Airlines: "Many of today's consumers will be priced out of the air: a sad legacy to 30 years of massive progress in democratizing air travel. Failure to invest in aviation infrastructure and the insatiable appetite for regulation will not be offset by relatively modest further improvements in aircraft efficiency."

"We want taxpayer dollars we just don't want anyone looking over our shoulders while we spend it."

Moreover, it's like he's being willfully ignorant of all the regulations that have been stripped away since the 1980s.  At this point, if a new regulation gets put into place, it's only because one of his ilk really screwed the pooch and a few hundred people ended up dead.


I remember a Maddow segment where she showed that even with 9/11 factored in, aircraft travel is the safest form of transport due in large part to the high regulation of the industry.
 
2014-01-01 09:56:25 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Some things require human touch.


static4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-01-01 09:58:38 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: dletter: a lot of media innovation... that person saying you can't hold your nephew above... I think in 40-50 years (maybe even sooner) it will be possible to do "virtually" in a way that feels so real that you will not be able to tell the difference physically

Having a stroke is no way to go into the new year.


Speak for yourself. Last night's porn-othon was one of my best ever.
 
2014-01-01 10:41:02 PM  
Notice that none of these industry executives, who would LOVE to cut unionized labor costs, especially higher salaried positions, have predicted pilotless aircraft. That's good, because I really don't think I'd get on an airplane that didn't have somebody up front that is just as interested in getting there in one piece as I am, no matter what may go wrong with the automation or other systems.
 
2014-01-01 10:41:08 PM  

dletter: Marcus Aurelius: ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.

And yet no one foresaw the foremost driver of 21st century communication technology.

Porn.

I predict that one of the great growth areas of study in the 21st century will be pornknowgraphy.

Porn drives a lot of media innovation...  that person saying you can't hold your nephew above... I think in 40-50 years (maybe even sooner) it will be possible to do "virtually" in a way that feels so real that you will not be able to tell the difference physically, other than the fact that "mentally" you know you aren't there.... but, the innovation behind that technology will be because the virtual sex market made it possible.




I hear the "porn drives innovation" argument alot...but can anyone provide ANY examples of something innovative that was invented (media wise) specifically because porn said "hey, we need this!" I can certainly see porn driving the ADOPTION RATE of new media technologies, but not the creation of media tech itself.
 
2014-01-01 10:59:33 PM  
Wait until a real AI search engine comes online and Google becomes yesterday's news.

What, you think Google is an unsinkable rubber duckie? Better mousetraps and all that. The TV channels are about to shiat their pants with the wave of cable cutters, and their advertisers are desperate to reach just that demographic.

If only I could convince people to specifically NOT buy things that have been advertised. We've already broken most of the salesmanship crap down.
 
2014-01-01 11:35:03 PM  

snowshovel: dletter: Marcus Aurelius: ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.

And yet no one foresaw the foremost driver of 21st century communication technology.

Porn.

I predict that one of the great growth areas of study in the 21st century will be pornknowgraphy.

Porn drives a lot of media innovation...  that person saying you can't hold your nephew above... I think in 40-50 years (maybe even sooner) it will be possible to do "virtually" in a way that feels so real that you will not be able to tell the difference physically, other than the fact that "mentally" you know you aren't there.... but, the innovation behind that technology will be because the virtual sex market made it possible.

I hear the "porn drives innovation" argument alot...but can anyone provide ANY examples of something innovative that was invented (media wise) specifically because porn said "hey, we need this!" I can certainly see porn driving the ADOPTION RATE of new media technologies, but not the creation of media tech itself.


http://www.cracked.com/article_18888_5-ways-porn-created-modern-worl d. html
 
2014-01-02 01:06:05 AM  

Agent Smiths Laugh: SwiftFox: But what about monsters from the id?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 465x163]

Don't bring Carmack into this.


www.trilobite.org
Sees what you did there.
 
2014-01-02 01:36:45 AM  

fusillade762: [travelinksites.com image 850x566]

Yeah, just looking at it is enough. Why would I want to actually SWIM in it?


The real innovation is in communication, and there are a lot of things that tech has replaced no problem, but there are certain things that even if replicable in some sort of virtual reality aren't the same as being there. Unless we get a holodeck that replicates smells and all of the little things about a place, communication technology doesn't replace going places.

Though, communication technology is great when you're far away, and the rapid changes are awesome. When I went away to college nearly 15 years ago, long distance calls were expensive and calling home was something you scheduled because you don't call for silly little things. Now, I don't think twice about making international long distance cell phone calls about stupid things while traveling halfway around the world.
 
2014-01-02 06:57:24 AM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Peter von Nostrand: And everyone blames unions instead of management in the airline and auto industry for the problems they have

That goes for every industry in which Union Thugs work.


Yeah, screw the middle class!

/where I'm from over 80% of the middle class is union families
//who do you think trains the folks who build buildings? Every school I know got rid of every practical hands on class before I hit high school. You don't get a degree in carpentry or plumbing at a community college.
 
2014-01-02 08:27:41 AM  
- Mark Dunkerley, CEO Hawaiian Airlines: "Many of today's consumers will be priced out of the air: a sad legacy to 30 years of massive progress in democratizing air travel. Failure to invest in aviation infrastructure and the insatiable appetite for regulation will not be offset by relatively modest further improvements in aircraft efficiency."

lolwut?  If the industry was still regulated, it might be providing actual customer service these days.
 
2014-01-02 08:51:44 AM  

Agent Smiths Laugh: SwiftFox: But what about monsters from the id?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 465x163]

Don't bring Carmack into this.


He's not with Id any more, he's working with the Occulus Rift people.
 
2014-01-02 08:57:10 AM  

snowshovel: dletter: Marcus Aurelius: ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.

And yet no one foresaw the foremost driver of 21st century communication technology.

Porn.

I predict that one of the great growth areas of study in the 21st century will be pornknowgraphy.

Porn drives a lot of media innovation...  that person saying you can't hold your nephew above... I think in 40-50 years (maybe even sooner) it will be possible to do "virtually" in a way that feels so real that you will not be able to tell the difference physically, other than the fact that "mentally" you know you aren't there.... but, the innovation behind that technology will be because the virtual sex market made it possible.

I hear the "porn drives innovation" argument alot...but can anyone provide ANY examples of something innovative that was invented (media wise) specifically because porn said "hey, we need this!" I can certainly see porn driving the ADOPTION RATE of new media technologies, but not the creation of media tech itself.


No, I'd say the way you phrased it is what it really meant by that... it isn't that people go "I'm going to invent this for porn", but, the porn industry "jumps on" new technologies (usually) faster that everyone else.
 
2014-01-02 09:57:39 AM  

Mentat: - Mark Dunkerley, CEO Hawaiian Airlines: "Many of today's consumers will be priced out of the air: a sad legacy to 30 years of massive progress in democratizing air travel. Failure to invest in aviation infrastructure and the insatiable appetite for regulation will not be offset by relatively modest further improvements in aircraft efficiency."

"We want taxpayer dollars we just don't want anyone looking over our shoulders while we spend it."


I think his prediction is sound despite it being really whiny and totally Hawaii-centric.  Consumers are already nearly priced out.  I'm not an airline CEO, so I can't speculate on why, but I doubt regulation is the whole story.
 
2014-01-02 10:21:25 AM  

buzzcut73: Notice that none of these industry executives, who would LOVE to cut unionized labor costs, especially higher salaried positions, have predicted pilotless aircraft. That's good, because I really don't think I'd get on an airplane that didn't have somebody up front that is just as interested in getting there in one piece as I am, no matter what may go wrong with the automation or other systems.


Eventually, it will happen, but not anytime remotely soon. One thing I heard is being looked at is having only one pilot and a systems operator. The systems guy basically just sits there unless anything goes wrong (and possibly work the radios) while the pilot only flies the plane. The systems guy technically wouldn't be a pilot, so, he wouldn't make as much, be subject to the same regulations, etc... Again, its only something I heard was being considered at the R&D level.

Or, as the old joke goes, there will be a pilot and a dog. The pilot's job is to feed the dog. The dog's job is to bite the pilot if he touches anything.
 
2014-01-02 10:28:20 AM  
IN 25 YEARS
- David Barger, CEO JetBlue Airways: "The freedom to travel between any two points in the world will be commonplace. There will be billions of travelers every year flying on new aircraft that will be environmentally friendly; in fact, they will be making zero-carbon travel maybe even a reality."

- Sir Richard Branson, president Virgin Atlantic Airways: "I have no doubt that during my lifetime we will be able to fly from London to Sydney in under two hours, with minimal environmental impact. The awe-inspiring views of our beautiful planet below and zero-gravity passenger fun will bring a whole new meaning to in-flight entertainment."


Are you guys huffing jet fuel or taking it intravenously?


- Mark Dunkerley, CEO Hawaiian Airlines: "Many of today's consumers will be priced out of the air: a sad legacy to 30 years of massive progress in democratizing air travel. Failure to invest in aviation infrastructure and the insatiable appetite for regulation will not be offset by relatively modest further improvements in aircraft efficiency."

Yeah, it's all due to regulations. Nothing to do with the fact that $100/barrel oil is the new normal and will steadily rise. Fewer people flying isn't necessarily a bad thing.
 
2014-01-02 10:29:24 AM  
 Maurice J. Gallagher, Jr., CEO Allegiant Travel Co.: "The next five years will be all about increasing automation and decreasing labor cost ..."

Translation: We're gonna fire people.
 
2014-01-02 10:53:19 AM  
Wednesday marks the 100th anniversary of the first commercial flight: a 23-minute hop across Florida's Tampa Bay. The St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line was subsidized by St. Petersburg officials who wanted more winter tourists in their city. The alternative: an 11-hour train ride from Tampa.

Pilot Tony Jannus had room for just one passenger, who sat next to him in the open cockpit. Three months later - when tourism season ended - so did the subsidy. The airline had carried 1,204 passengers but would never fly again.


And we hold loud outdoor concerts at a venue named in his honor.
 
2014-01-02 11:06:43 AM  

Peter von Nostrand: And everyone blames unions instead of management in the airline and auto industry for the problems they have


Bingo. The real fun is realizing that, slowly but surely, people are becoming the least-desired expense in any business. Airlines would love to do away with as many people as possible, automating as much as possible to ensure the most predictable, reliable, and maximized profit possible.

However, so would every other business on the planet. We're in a dangerous time, in which people are going to be increasingly irrelevant in any task that can be automated. We haven't figured out how you survive that kind of economy - we're hugely overpopulated, with a workforce that once served as the backbone of manufacturing and industry. We'll still be overpopulated for decades to come, but that workforce will become increasingly useless. Not just difficult or impossible to retrain, but simply too numerous for the jobs that remain.

That's when the fun really starts...
 
2014-01-02 01:23:44 PM  

FormlessOne: Peter von Nostrand: And everyone blames unions instead of management in the airline and auto industry for the problems they have

Bingo. The real fun is realizing that, slowly but surely, people are becoming the least-desired expense in any business. Airlines would love to do away with as many people as possible, automating as much as possible to ensure the most predictable, reliable, and maximized profit possible.

However, so would every other business on the planet. We're in a dangerous time, in which people are going to be increasingly irrelevant in any task that can be automated. We haven't figured out how you survive that kind of economy - we're hugely overpopulated, with a workforce that once served as the backbone of manufacturing and industry. We'll still be overpopulated for decades to come, but that workforce will become increasingly useless. Not just difficult or impossible to retrain, but simply too numerous for the jobs that remain.

That's when the fun really starts...


Yeah, but we've been dealing with this for the last 30 years.

mercatus.org
www.multpl.com
data.bls.gov

So:
* Manufacturing jobs are flat until 2001 and then down ever since then.
* Population is increasing.
* The Workforce is increasing even faster because we added women and blah people to the educated mainstream workforce.
* And yet, unemployment is more or less stable since the end of stagflation (though some of that might be due to people like Kiesha who is 'retired' at 21).  It's certainly not at the 30-40% levels that the above things would suggest.

So I'm not nearly as pessimistic as you.  We'll work through it.
 
2014-01-02 06:02:14 PM  

snowshovel: dletter: Marcus Aurelius: ZAZ: A big failure of 20th century science and science fiction predictions was failing to see how communication could substitute for travel. For example, Clarke saw the advantage of a weather station in geosynchronous orbit, but assumed it would be manned. Niven wrote about flash crowds c. 1970, and they happened in cyberspace instead of reality c. 2000.  We send robots to Mars rather than humans. I can easily believe air travel will be mostly obsolete in a century.

And yet no one foresaw the foremost driver of 21st century communication technology.

Porn.

I predict that one of the great growth areas of study in the 21st century will be pornknowgraphy.

Porn drives a lot of media innovation...  that person saying you can't hold your nephew above... I think in 40-50 years (maybe even sooner) it will be possible to do "virtually" in a way that feels so real that you will not be able to tell the difference physically, other than the fact that "mentally" you know you aren't there.... but, the innovation behind that technology will be because the virtual sex market made it possible.



I hear the "porn drives innovation" argument alot...but can anyone provide ANY examples of something innovative that was invented (media wise) specifically because porn said "hey, we need this!" I can certainly see porn driving the ADOPTION RATE of new media technologies, but not the creation of media tech itself.


Streaming video on the interwebs and the improvements it gained pretty much. We were ready for netflix and amazon prime a lot sooner.

Also espn does its fair share. Their scoreboard was one of the first I saw to switch to Ajax instead of 30 second refresh.
 
2014-01-02 07:08:07 PM  
None of those airline "visionaries" in TFA will admit that hub-and-spoke routing is for cargo, not people. The future of air travel is in Direct Flight, point-to-point, non-stop, using smaller city and regional airports, closer to where you ultimately wanted to go.  Look at a map of your favorite jet destination sometime, and look at the number of secondary airports nice and close to where you want to be, instead of the hub airports.

Google is uniquely positioned to create a spin-off service (perhaps it's own branded charter airline)  to optimize this kind of semi-charter travel, where you can name a destination up to 48 hours ahead, and software will aggregate enough other people going your way to fill a 50- seat regional jet going from smaller city airports, flying non-stop and direct, undisturbed by the delays that plague the hub and spoke system.  Really, it's not that different from how hotels fill up extra rooms with Priceline.  It was already pioneered in Florida, and is poised to expand nationwide.

Enhanced GPS and direct flight routing software lets these smaller  jets optimize their routes, saving time and fuel. You'd have to stop for fuel only on the very longest cross-country flights, and it would be a quick pit-stop, about fifteen minutes and back on the way, no de-planing.
 
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