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(News 13 Orlando)   Florida's time capsule is decidedly boring   (mynews13.com) divider line 38
    More: Florida, florida, Florida Senate, Alachua County, Florida Department of Transportation, Florida Governor, Florida State, Florida History  
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5103 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jan 2014 at 2:30 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-01 12:32:23 PM  
Someone dig it up! I'm sure the missing votes from the 2000 Presidential election are hidden inside! o.o
 
2014-01-01 01:37:03 PM  
Then they threw it in to another sinkhole . . . .
 
2014-01-01 02:06:04 PM  
 2013 Great Floridian Award for Juan Ponce de León. Presented by the Office of Florida

Governor Rick Scott.
Material: Glass


lol
 
2014-01-01 02:20:37 PM  
A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.
 
2014-01-01 02:23:21 PM  
They should put a Gold coin in there because Gold will be worth so much by then and you know Gold.
 
2014-01-01 02:34:08 PM  

unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.


That's what I was thinking.
 
2014-01-01 02:36:38 PM  

KarmicDisaster: They should put a Gold coin in there because Gold will be worth so much by then and you know Gold.


Good God no... with all the meth-heads and crack-fiends in this state, if there was anything of actual value in it, it'd be dug up and sold for scrap within two hours.
 
2014-01-01 02:37:49 PM  
How often do you hear about one of those things actually getting dug up? People lose them or forget about them or pile stuff on top of them so often that most of them never get seen again.
 
v15
2014-01-01 02:38:00 PM  

2) A Short History of Florida, from 12,000 years before 2013 to the space shuttle program,
which ended in 2011.


Oh that's right. NASA only explores sand n*gger outreach now.
 
2014-01-01 02:38:12 PM  
They put the map to find the time capsule in the time capsule.
 
2014-01-01 02:42:14 PM  
Wow, Flagler County really phoned it in.
 
2014-01-01 02:44:36 PM  
I'm not staying up to see them open it.
 
2014-01-01 02:45:32 PM  

bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.


None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.
 
2014-01-01 02:46:04 PM  

Gosling: How often do you hear about one of those things actually getting dug up? People lose them or forget about them or pile stuff on top of them so often that most of them never get seen again.


I have noticed that they get dug up after about 11 years.
 
2014-01-01 02:46:07 PM  

KarmicDisaster: They should put a Gold coin in there because Gold will be worth so much by then and you know Gold.


Florida Department of Agriculture Commemorative Coin, submitted by Florida
There's a real collector's item.
 
2014-01-01 02:50:00 PM  

Aquapope: bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.

None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.


I know, right?
 
2014-01-01 02:50:21 PM  
They should put something in there that future generations will find hilarious, like the U.S. Bill of Rights.
 
2014-01-01 02:55:26 PM  

Aquapope: bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.

None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.


Actually, data gets lost this way all the time.   NASA has reams of data tapes from the early moon shots that are unreadable, and that's not even 50 years in our rear view mirror.  I have one oilfield client that has 40 years of seismic data that they're desperately trying to retrieve from old magnetic tape and archive before the lone drive capable of reading them craps out, or the lone computer circa 1990 capable of supporting the lone interface card circa 1985 capable of supporting the lone drive  circa 1980 craps out, whichever comes first.  Some things, you just can't virtualize.
 
2014-01-01 02:55:44 PM  

Snazzy1: Wow, Flagler County really phoned it in.


Huh, I could have given them something more memorable than that.
Perhaps a pile of pink-slips and foreclosure notices. All they had to do was ask.
 
2014-01-01 03:01:35 PM  
They need to print a few Fark main pages.  "What are these catagories about: asinine, cool, dumbass, Florida?"
 
2014-01-01 03:05:10 PM  
If it's going to be things Floridians like now, then how about printed-out mugshots of all of FL's arrestees for 2013?

The perps can retrieve them, for $200 each.
 
2014-01-01 03:09:51 PM  

unyon: Aquapope: bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.

None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.

Actually, data gets lost this way all the time.   NASA has reams of data tapes from the early moon shots that are unreadable, and that's not even 50 years in our rear view mirror.  I have one oilfield client that has 40 years of seismic data that they're desperately trying to retrieve from old magnetic tape and archive before the lone drive capable of reading them craps out, or the lone computer circa 1990 capable of supporting the lone interface card circa 1985 capable of supporting the lone drive  circa 1980 craps out, whichever comes first.  Some things, you just can't virtualize.


There are billions of DVD playing devices today.  None of them will survive the next 60 years.  I understand now, thanks..
 
2014-01-01 03:33:49 PM  
If it doesn't include a singing, dancing frog I'm not interested.
 
2014-01-01 03:39:57 PM  

unyon: Aquapope: bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.

None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.

Actually, data gets lost this way all the time.   NASA has reams of data tapes from the early moon shots that are unreadable, and that's not even 50 years in our rear view mirror.  I have one oilfield client that has 40 years of seismic data that they're desperately trying to retrieve from old magnetic tape and archive before the lone drive capable of reading them craps out, or the lone computer circa 1990 capable of supporting the lone interface card circa 1985 capable of supporting the lone drive  circa 1980 craps out, whichever comes first.  Some things, you just can't virtualize.


Assuming the media itself doesn't deteriorate to the point of being unreadable, everything is recoverable for a price.  I don't know what the situation is with NASA's tapes, but there's nothing stopping a company from building a new reader based on the old spec as long as the data on the tapes is still sound.

It just comes down to if it's determined to be worth the cost to recreate the old technology for what would essentially be a one-off device.
 
2014-01-01 03:54:23 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Assuming the media itself doesn't deteriorate to the point of being unreadable, everything is recoverable for a price.  I don't know what the situation is with NASA's tapes, but there's nothing stopping a company from building a new reader based on the old spec as long as the data on the tapes is still sound.

It just comes down to if it's determined to be worth the cost to recreate the old technology for what would essentially be a one-off device.


I suppose they could include a mothballed laptop with a DVD player in the capsule.  Then they'd just have to worry about 110v outlets becoming passe.
 
2014-01-01 04:08:32 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Assuming the media itself doesn't deteriorate to the point of being unreadable, everything is recoverable for a price.  I don't know what the situation is with NASA's tapes, but there's nothing stopping a company from building a new reader based on the old spec as long as the data on the tapes is still sound.

It just comes down to if it's determined to be worth the cost to recreate the old technology for what would essentially be a one-off device.


You're not wrong, but recreating old tech is actually a pretty challenging thing.  Between the drive itself, to the interface, to the thing that drives the interface, to the drivers that sit over top of all of that.  And raw data isn't considered useful right up until it is, meaning that it rarely makes business sense to re-archive things.  You'd be surprised how much data gets lost to the sands of time that way.

Aquapope: There are billions of DVD playing devices today.  None of them will survive the next 60 years.  I understand now, thanks..


Wow.  How incredibly nearsighted.  I didn't say none would survive.  But what shape will they be in?  Where is the surplus of those millions of 78rpm record players from 80 years ago kicking around?  And that's a media that can actually survive the ravages of time.

'Disk Rot' is a very real phenomenon.  The lacquer layer of a CD delaminates, and the data is corrupted, partially missing, or gone altogether.  This phenomenon is more common on 3rd party burnt disks (like the one in the article), and can start occurring in under a decade.  Granted, this time capsule is presumably light and climate controlled, so the degradation should theoretically be slower.  But what happens to a CD after 80 years?  Since widespread use of the technology is less than 30 years old, we actually have no idea whatsoever.  So a fat lot of good one of those billions of CD players does you with a degraded disk.

The reality is that we lose scientific data at a rate of about 17% a year, due to storage, archiving, and data management practices.  I wouldn't expect this disk to be anything other than an 80 year old coaster when the capsule gets opened.
 
2014-01-01 04:10:12 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: unyon: Aquapope: bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.

None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.

Actually, data gets lost this way all the time.   NASA has reams of data tapes from the early moon shots that are unreadable, and that's not even 50 years in our rear view mirror.  I have one oilfield client that has 40 years of seismic data that they're desperately trying to retrieve from old magnetic tape and archive before the lone drive capable of reading them craps out, or the lone computer circa 1990 capable of supporting the lone interface card circa 1985 capable of supporting the lone drive  circa 1980 craps out, whichever comes first.  Some things, you just can't virtualize.

Assuming the media itself doesn't deteriorate to the point of being unreadable, everything is recoverable for a price.  I don't know what the situation is with NASA's tapes, but there's nothing stopping a company from building a new reader based on the old spec as long as the data on the tapes is still sound.

It just comes down to if it's determined to be worth the cost to recreate the old technology for what would essentially be a one-off device.


blog.seattlepi.com

Ooooh, Betamax.
 
2014-01-01 04:28:16 PM  

unyon: TuteTibiImperes: Assuming the media itself doesn't deteriorate to the point of being unreadable, everything is recoverable for a price.  I don't know what the situation is with NASA's tapes, but there's nothing stopping a company from building a new reader based on the old spec as long as the data on the tapes is still sound.

It just comes down to if it's determined to be worth the cost to recreate the old technology for what would essentially be a one-off device.

You're not wrong, but recreating old tech is actually a pretty challenging thing.  Between the drive itself, to the interface, to the thing that drives the interface, to the drivers that sit over top of all of that.  And raw data isn't considered useful right up until it is, meaning that it rarely makes business sense to re-archive things.  You'd be surprised how much data gets lost to the sands of time that way.

Aquapope: There are billions of DVD playing devices today.  None of them will survive the next 60 years.  I understand now, thanks..

Wow.  How incredibly nearsighted.  I didn't say none would survive.  But what shape will they be in?  Where is the surplus of those millions of 78rpm record players from 80 years ago kicking around?  And that's a media that can actually survive the ravages of time.


My point was that 60 years is no big deal to expect  DVD to be usable technology considering the plethora of consumer-available DVD players right now.  There will be millions working perfectly well 60 years from now.   Sure those DVD players are eventually going to break, but it won't be 60 years.   As for those 78rpm players, they're all over the place!
 
2014-01-01 04:29:46 PM  

Aquapope: bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.

None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.


So just put a DVD player in the time capsule - problem solved.
 
2014-01-01 04:56:08 PM  

unyon: Where is the surplus of those millions of 78rpm record players from 80 years ago kicking around?


From 80 years ago?  Dunno.

But I saw a stack of new ones at Urban Outfitters just the other day.
 
2014-01-01 04:56:19 PM  

MBrady: So just put a DVD player in the time capsule - problem solved.


Yeah, but they didn't.  And even if you did, make sure it's one with a display built in, because you can't hardly plug anything with RCA outs into a modern TV, let alone whatever we'll be using 80 years from now.  And hopefully, we're also using 60hz  120v power.

Aquapope: My point was that 60 years is no big deal to expect  DVD to be usable technology considering the plethora of consumer-available DVD players right now.  There will be millions working perfectly well 60 years from now.   Sure those DVD players are eventually going to break, but it won't be 60 years.   As for those 78rpm players, they're all over the place!


I understand your point.  I'm just suggesting that it's irrelevant.  My point is that the sheer abundance of any given technology is no reason to expect it to persist.   Especially with the exponential curve that technology is on.  10 years ago, there were literally billions of CRT displays on the planet.  Today, in the first world, they exist largely in dusty corners of basements, because they're a pain to dispose of.  10 years from now, they won't exist outside of a museum.  Disk-based technology is already irrelevant.  It won't be around as an active technology for another 10 years, let alone 80.  Understand that this is a technology that was invented, commercialized, popularized, exploited, made ubiquitous, and then made irrelevant in the span of less than a half-generation.  The thing that makes CDs irrelevant will have been made irrelevant by the thing that has made it irrelevant by the time this capsule is opened.

But all of this is besides the point, as you've correctly noted, since only 1 functioning DVD player capable of being connected to whatever display mechanism is available needs to persist.  That is, presuming the media is readable.

And that's the crux.  Both you and MBrady assume that the media will be in fine readable shape 80 years from now.  I'm saying that there's nothing about the chemistry, construction, or usability of the CD or DVD reflective layer that would suggest that that will be the case.  Unlike, say, that 78 rpm disk that we're talking about, which is a robust wax imprint capable of withstanding the ravages of time safe in its protective envelope, a DVD is dependant on volatile adhesives for the reflective layer.  Even a marginal delamination can render the disk unreadable.
 
2014-01-01 07:31:32 PM  
Hold the presses! The time capsule contains a "holiday ornament"! Dig it up now or Florida will disappear beneath the waves like the Lost City of Atlantis, because God is deeply offended when somebody says holy days instead of Christ mass.

Then again, Florida will probably sink beneath the waves by 2095 any way, so don't worry about it.

One super-hurricane and half of it will be gone. Sea level is rising at several millimeters (the thickness of a dime) a year. The rate of rise has risen from 2 mm to 3 mm a year since 1990 or later. Between the two causes, I'd say the odds are that Florida will lose half its land area in 80 years.
 
2014-01-01 07:48:39 PM  
Hillsborough County County?

Yup. That's Florida.
 
2014-01-02 12:02:55 AM  
unyon:

Wow.  How incredibly nearsighted.  I didn't say none would survive.  But what shape will they be in?  Where is the surplus of those millions of 78rpm record players from 80 years ago kicking around?  And that's a media that can actually survive the ravages of time.

I don't know where all of them are, but one of them is in my living room.  It works.
 
2014-01-02 12:17:35 AM  
Put all of the digital media onto Dropbox or sky drive or icloud and scribble the password onto a post it note and put it into the box
 
2014-01-02 12:21:49 AM  

Aquapope: bikerbob59: unyon: A DVD video?  You won't be able to play that in 10 years, let alone 80.

That's what I was thinking.

None of the recordable media from before 10 years ago is playable today - all that info is just lost.  No phonographs, reel-to-reel, cassette, film, 8-track, CD...none of it.

What fools they are.


But they do have the digital photographs on paper. That has to count for something.
 
2014-01-02 12:07:08 PM  

unyon: MBrady: So just put a DVD player in the time capsule - problem solved.

Yeah, but they didn't.  And even if you did, make sure it's one with a display built in, because you can't hardly plug anything with RCA outs into a modern TV, let alone whatever we'll be using 80 years from now.  And hopefully, we're also using 60hz  120v power.

Aquapope: My point was that 60 years is no big deal to expect  DVD to be usable technology considering the plethora of consumer-available DVD players right now.  There will be millions working perfectly well 60 years from now.   Sure those DVD players are eventually going to break, but it won't be 60 years.   As for those 78rpm players, they're all over the place!

I understand your point.  I'm just suggesting that it's irrelevant.  My point is that the sheer abundance of any given technology is no reason to expect it to persist.   Especially with the exponential curve that technology is on.  10 years ago, there were literally billions of CRT displays on the planet.  Today, in the first world, they exist largely in dusty corners of basements, because they're a pain to dispose of.  10 years from now, they won't exist outside of a museum.  Disk-based technology is already irrelevant.  It won't be around as an active technology for another 10 years, let alone 80.  Understand that this is a technology that was invented, commercialized, popularized, exploited, made ubiquitous, and then made irrelevant in the span of less than a half-generation.  The thing that makes CDs irrelevant will have been made irrelevant by the thing that has made it irrelevant by the time this capsule is opened.

But all of this is besides the point, as you've correctly noted, since only 1 functioning DVD player capable of being connected to whatever display mechanism is available needs to persist.  That is, presuming the media is readable.

And that's the crux.  Both you and MBrady assume that the media will be in fine readable shape 80 years from now.  I'm saying ...


Hey Marty McFly was able to show 80s camcorder video on a 30 year old TV, so we have that going for us.
 
2014-01-02 01:43:13 PM  
MBrady: Hey Marty McFly was able to show 80s camcorder video on a 30 year old TV, so we have that going for us.

What that scene didn't show is how they managed to flange up RCA out to the arial connector on that TV.  At the very least, Doc Brown would have had to jury rig (and probably invent) an  RF modulator for that job.  Indeed, RCA in wasn't common on TVs until the mid-80s.  Most early video games (Atari 2600, intellivision, etc) came with an RF modulator for that very reason.

After typing that, I did a little research- It turns out that the job was sufficiently challenging that the producers of the film, in 1985, couldn't even get it to work.  They ended up putting a modern TV in the classic cabinet to solve that issue instead, so there must have been another issue other than RF modulation, because that was an easy problem to solve in 1985.
 
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