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(BBC)   Soon, the sound of the rabbi plucking his six string will no longer roll across the Delta, the synagogues will close, and the South will be the way you thought it always was   ( bbc.co.uk) divider line
    More: Sad, souths, Vicksburg, Adobe Flash  
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7310 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Dec 2013 at 11:31 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-30 12:51:36 PM  
2 votes:

news.bbcimg.co.uk



Uh... am I supposed to just know WTF is going on in this pic? Did I miss some context in the article? By not knowing why the hell these women are wearing boat, laundry, etc hats does that make me an anti-semite? Because... yanno... I wouldn't want to be one of those.
2013-12-30 12:22:42 PM  
2 votes:

Ethertap: I live in a small town in south Georgia, the synagogue here is only open for a lay-led service once a month and there are 11 members.  All their kids have moved to larger communities, since the opportunities their great-grandparents had are gone.  This is common in several small southern towns I've visited in south Georgia and Alabama.

If I wanted to go to service every week I would have to drive to Dothan (quasi-famous for once offering a "signing bonus" to any Jewish family moving there) or Tallahassee.   Atlanta has a substantial and strong Jewish population - something like 90% of all Jews in Georgia live in the Atlanta metro area.


1. Aren't all services "lay-led"? There may be a rabbi in attendance, or a full-time cantor (whose credentials are usually choral and voice work, not liturgical studies), but Jewish services are entirely lay-led. (Maybe that's only a common thing among Orthodoxy and some Conservative branches?)
2a. Cities have Jews. Period. It's true of pretty much any and every city in the world, including Dubai and New Delhi. That the far-flung South ever had Jews in significant numbers was interesting enough.
2b. Far-flung areas get hit hard by recessions or economic downturns, and people pull stumps for areas that are doing better (like cities). This is also not a new phenomenon.
Not 2b. Baltimore (yes, the one in MD) was offering signing bonuses for observant, single men moving to the area. With a HUGE Jewish community and one of the biggest cultural centers outside NY (the Ner Yisrael school), you might think they wouldn't need to recruit so hard. Baltimore's apparently got lots of single Jewish ladies.

Google the term "shidduch crisis" if you want a bit of a laugh.
2013-12-30 11:36:37 AM  
2 votes:

Nabb1: There is still a very large, thriving Jewish community in New Orleans, but New Orleans is often a bit different than the rest of the South.


They are talking about the Delta, not the South in general - unless we've redefined "the South" to mean only one part of Mississippi.
2013-12-30 11:20:48 AM  
2 votes:
There is still a very large, thriving Jewish community in New Orleans, but New Orleans is often a bit different than the rest of the South.
2013-12-30 11:10:01 AM  
2 votes:
You silly rabbi! The sticks are for hicks!
2013-12-30 10:21:34 AM  
2 votes:
This has been going on for some time.

My college roommate ultimately went on to be a rabbi (we did our undergrads from '88-'92).  Well before he entered rabbinical studies he used to go down to Arkansas during the High Holy Days to help conduct services because they didn't have many rabbis left.
2013-12-30 01:29:28 PM  
1 vote:

Goodluckfox: Nabb1: phalamir: Nabb1: There is still a very large, thriving Jewish community in New Orleans, but New Orleans is often a bit different than the rest of the South.

They are talking about the Delta, not the South in general - unless we've redefined "the South" to mean only one part of Mississippi.

It's not just the Mississippi Delta, though. Lots of communities across the South are losing groups as kids move to more metropolitan areas.

I was born in the Delta, and have lived in MS for most of my life, other than a few years in Arkansas and Tennessee.

Nabb1 has it right. It's not just the Jews leaving. It's everyone that can. This isn't really even a noteworthy story; it' s the logical outcome of demographic and economic changes.


Count me as one -- although I stayed in the South, didn't go back to the my small home town on the edge of the Delta. I always say that Mississippi is a good place to be from. But I have a bookcase full of books on Mississippi. It's an interesting place, more diverse than people think. We always said that every town (at least those in the Delta) had a Chinese grocery, a Lebanese furniture store and a Jewish clothing store. I just can't live there.
2013-12-30 01:08:26 PM  
1 vote:

Nabb1: phalamir: Nabb1: There is still a very large, thriving Jewish community in New Orleans, but New Orleans is often a bit different than the rest of the South.

They are talking about the Delta, not the South in general - unless we've redefined "the South" to mean only one part of Mississippi.

It's not just the Mississippi Delta, though. Lots of communities across the South are losing groups as kids move to more metropolitan areas.


I was born in the Delta, and have lived in MS for most of my life, other than a few years in Arkansas and Tennessee.

Nabb1 has it right. It's not just the Jews leaving. It's everyone that can. This isn't really even a noteworthy story; it' s the logical outcome of demographic and economic changes.
2013-12-30 12:58:05 PM  
1 vote:

Nabb1: phalamir: Nabb1: There is still a very large, thriving Jewish community in New Orleans, but New Orleans is often a bit different than the rest of the South.

They are talking about the Delta, not the South in general - unless we've redefined "the South" to mean only one part of Mississippi.

It's not just the Mississippi Delta, though. Lots of communities across the South are losing groups as kids move to more metropolitan areas.


The same is true of the Midwest. We went out to rural Missouri to bury my father in law in the family plot. Almost every one of her family members left in the area was over 50. Only one person out of the 15 or so in my wife's generation decided to stay and make a life out of farming.
2013-12-30 12:21:05 PM  
1 vote:

phalamir: Nabb1: There is still a very large, thriving Jewish community in New Orleans, but New Orleans is often a bit different than the rest of the South.

They are talking about the Delta, not the South in general - unless we've redefined "the South" to mean only one part of Mississippi.


It's not just the Mississippi Delta, though. Lots of communities across the South are losing groups as kids move to more metropolitan areas.
2013-12-30 12:16:20 PM  
1 vote:

Ethertap: I live in a small town in south Georgia, the synagogue here is only open for a lay-led service once a month and there are 11 members.  All their kids have moved to larger communities, since the opportunities their great-grandparents had are gone.  This is common in several small southern towns I've visited in south Georgia and Alabama.

If I wanted to go to service every week I would have to drive to Dothan (quasi-famous for once offering a "signing bonus" to any Jewish family moving there) or Tallahassee.   Atlanta has a substantial and strong Jewish population - something like 90% of all Jews in Georgia live in the Atlanta metro area.


Doesn't 90% of everybody in Georgia live in the Atlanta metro area?

But yes, this is clearly a rural-to-urban migration story, not a South-to-not-South migration story.  Jewish communities are still strong in Memphis and Little Rock, as well the cities already mentioned.
2013-12-30 11:49:26 AM  
1 vote:
I live in a small town in south Georgia, the synagogue here is only open for a lay-led service once a month and there are 11 members.  All their kids have moved to larger communities, since the opportunities their great-grandparents had are gone.  This is common in several small southern towns I've visited in south Georgia and Alabama.

If I wanted to go to service every week I would have to drive to Dothan (quasi-famous for once offering a "signing bonus" to any Jewish family moving there) or Tallahassee.   Atlanta has a substantial and strong Jewish population - something like 90% of all Jews in Georgia live in the Atlanta metro area.
2013-12-30 11:46:05 AM  
1 vote:
The Jews stayed in that area so long as a "screw you" to General Grant...

/by expelling the Jews from Tennessee, he would've expelled my great-great-great-grandfather, who was fighting for the Union
//he lived in Chattanooga but fought for the Union in a New York regiment
2013-12-30 11:44:35 AM  
1 vote:

phalamir: Nabb1: There is still a very large, thriving Jewish community in New Orleans, but New Orleans is often a bit different than the rest of the South.

They are talking about the Delta, not the South in general - unless we've redefined "the South" to mean only one part of Mississippi.


Pretty much the same all across the rural South. Even in some of the larger towns (Columbus, GA, Montgomery) the same thing is happening.  Everyone is going where the money is.
2013-12-30 11:39:23 AM  
1 vote:
People grow old and die, or decide to move away from where they grew up. Not a story.

Those people are Jews. STORY! BIG STORY! EVERYBODY LOOKIE HERE, J*E*W*S ARE DYING AND BEING FORCED OUT OF THEIR HOMES! NO NORMAL LOGICAL EXPLANATION WHATSOEVER!!!!
 
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