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(TreeHugger)   The history of the Etch-A-Sketch. As told on an Etch-A-Sketch   (treehugger.com) divider line 17
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5186 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Dec 2013 at 7:05 AM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-30 07:13:29 AM
Sounds a little shaky to me.
 
2013-12-30 07:19:46 AM
Does it show you how to make Thermite?
 
2013-12-30 07:21:37 AM
That's SO meta.
 
2013-12-30 07:23:24 AM
www.latinorebels.com
 
2013-12-30 07:30:15 AM
I was expecting the 'art' to be a little better.
im-possible.info
 
2013-12-30 07:48:09 AM
We were so poor we had Magic Slate.
 
2013-12-30 08:44:32 AM
My Dad was in sales and marketing for Ohio Art, so we always had lots of these around the house. All of us got pretty good at it (you can, in fact, draw a perfect circle... it just takes a lot of practice), and in the early 70's the box it was packaged in had a flower that was drawn by my Mom.

One of my favorite stories regarding the Etch-a-Sketch has to do with W.C. Killgallon, who was the owner and president of Ohio Art for many years (cool guy... he always gave me a toy or some candy whenever dad brought me to work with him). There was at one time a controversy about mercury being used in it (there never was - it's aluminum powder and plastic pellets), and comments that the glass was too fragile, and if you leaned on it, it could break (it's tempered glass made to automotive standards). To deal with these stories, Mr. Killgallon had a dozen or so reporters that covered the toy industry come out to Bryan, Ohio (where the Etch-a-Sketch was made) for a demonstration. Mr. Killgallon had each reporter pick two completed Etch-a-Sketches off the assembly line , then had them follow him across the street to a foundry, where he had each reporter climb a scaffold and drop the Etch-a-Sketches 25 feet onto a section of boiler plating. While several of them wound up with cracked casings and broken knobs, not a single one of the drawing screens had so much as a scratch on it (he kept two of them in his office to show later visitors).
 
2013-12-30 08:56:18 AM

LonMead: My Dad was in sales and marketing for Ohio Art, so we always had lots of these around the house. All of us got pretty good at it (you can, in fact, draw a perfect circle... it just takes a lot of practice), and in the early 70's the box it was packaged in had a flower that was drawn by my Mom.

One of my favorite stories regarding the Etch-a-Sketch has to do with W.C. Killgallon, who was the owner and president of Ohio Art for many years (cool guy... he always gave me a toy or some candy whenever dad brought me to work with him). There was at one time a controversy about mercury being used in it (there never was - it's aluminum powder and plastic pellets), and comments that the glass was too fragile, and if you leaned on it, it could break (it's tempered glass made to automotive standards). To deal with these stories, Mr. Killgallon had a dozen or so reporters that covered the toy industry come out to Bryan, Ohio (where the Etch-a-Sketch was made) for a demonstration. Mr. Killgallon had each reporter pick two completed Etch-a-Sketches off the assembly line , then had them follow him across the street to a foundry, where he had each reporter climb a scaffold and drop the Etch-a-Sketches 25 feet onto a section of boiler plating. While several of them wound up with cracked casings and broken knobs, not a single one of the drawing screens had so much as a scratch on it (he kept two of them in his office to show later visitors).


Listen to you, with your historically informed and interesting contribution to Fark.  You think you're better than us?
 
2013-12-30 09:00:30 AM

Aquapope: LonMead: (repeat of all that stuff I said above)

Listen to you, with your historically informed and interesting contribution to Fark.  You think you're better than us?


Hey, I just have the one... I gotta use it when I can.
 
2013-12-30 09:15:19 AM

LonMead: Aquapope: LonMead: (repeat of all that stuff I said above)

Listen to you, with your historically informed and interesting contribution to Fark.  You think you're better than us?

Hey, I just have the one... I gotta use it when I can.


What really sucks is when you have one REALLY GOOD story, and the opportunity never comes up.  Mine involves Tom Berenger and gays at West Point.
 
2013-12-30 09:21:43 AM

LonMead: My Dad was in sales and marketing for Ohio Art, so we always had lots of these around the house. All of us got pretty good at it (you can, in fact, draw a perfect circle... it just takes a lot of practice), and in the early 70's the box it was packaged in had a flower that was drawn by my Mom.

One of my favorite stories regarding the Etch-a-Sketch has to do with W.C. Killgallon, who was the owner and president of Ohio Art for many years (cool guy... he always gave me a toy or some candy whenever dad brought me to work with him). There was at one time a controversy about mercury being used in it (there never was - it's aluminum powder and plastic pellets), and comments that the glass was too fragile, and if you leaned on it, it could break (it's tempered glass made to automotive standards). To deal with these stories, Mr. Killgallon had a dozen or so reporters that covered the toy industry come out to Bryan, Ohio (where the Etch-a-Sketch was made) for a demonstration. Mr. Killgallon had each reporter pick two completed Etch-a-Sketches off the assembly line , then had them follow him across the street to a foundry, where he had each reporter climb a scaffold and drop the Etch-a-Sketches 25 feet onto a section of boiler plating. While several of them wound up with cracked casings and broken knobs, not a single one of the drawing screens had so much as a scratch on it (he kept two of them in his office to show later visitors).


Cool story indeed, bro - thanks for sharing

/also, that was some crappy sketching in the video.  I expected to see some actual etch-a-sketch artists doodling the scenes for narration.
 
2013-12-30 09:30:49 AM
I was actually happy to see "normal" sketches on the thing rather than the crazy, unrealistic stuff, artists normally come out with.

Love it or hate it, the EtchASketch has been around for generations, and even new kids love it.  My son just recently discovered one of our old ones.  His mission last week was to clear the entire screen so he could see the mechanism inside.

Who hasn't done that?
 
2013-12-30 09:58:38 AM
I loved the Etch-a-Sketch back in my youth.  We had one in the lunchroom when I was in grade 4.  Rather than be social and crap like the other kids were doing, I sat there one day during lunch and drew an entire cityscape.  (It was all orthogonal shapes, so few if any circles required except for the clouds in the sky which were okay if they were lumpy and oblong).  The principal saw it when I was done and gave me a certificate for the best Etch-a-Sketch drawing he'd ever seen.  I was inordinately proud of that certificate.  Other kids thought the drawing was cool, but that I was weird.  Some things never change.

/Brool story co.
 
2013-12-30 10:15:43 AM
We were so poor we had old fashioned pencil & paper.
 
M-G
2013-12-30 10:16:42 AM

LonMead: There was at one time a controversy about mercury being used in it


Now that they're made in China, anything could be in them...
 
2013-12-30 11:42:34 AM

M-G: LonMead: There was at one time a controversy about mercury being used in it

Now that they're made in China, anything could be in them...


It's all lead powder now.  The stylus is made from a dried, sharpened Yangtze river dolphin beak.
 
2013-12-30 12:00:36 PM
I could make stairs.
 
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