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(Deslidefied)   Another batch of awesome space images from 2013 (deslided for your viewing pleasure)   (deslide.clusterfake.net) divider line 2
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3980 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Dec 2013 at 7:18 PM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-29 02:41:24 PM  
1 votes:

SurelyShirley: bbfreak: Enjoy them why you can now. If things don't drastically change soon, the state of space science past the 2020's will be rather pathetic. ISS in the ocean, future flagship missions similar to Curiosity, Voyager, or  Cassini nonexistent. All to save a few billion dollars a year, less than 1 percent a year in the United States. That's the ticket.

There will be no space exploration without freedom, son.

[i44.tinypic.com image 800x550]

[i41.tinypic.com image 640x512]

[i43.tinypic.com image 600x300]

[i43.tinypic.com image 420x349]


Can somebody explain to me why we need new carriers (besides the political/military industrial reasons) when there is nothing else in the world that comes close to how well we built ours, run, deploy and maintain them?
2013-12-29 04:51:16 AM  
1 votes:

doglover: bbfreak: Enjoy them why you can now. If things don't drastically change soon, the state of space science past the 2020's will be rather pathetic. ISS in the ocean, future flagship missions similar to Curiosity, Voyager, or  Cassini nonexistent. All to save a few billion dollars a year, less than 1 percent a year in the United States. That's the ticket.

We need sexy missions.

Search for life on Europa.
Send people to Europa.
Open a Starbucks on Europa.


Unfortunately any mission to Europa is likely to cost at least as much as Cassini or Curiosity adjusted for inflation of course if not more. Those are the sort of missions that NASA doesn't have money for and yet should be gearing up to do right this very moment. Instead just this year alone, NASA hasdue to budget cuts scuttled the more efficient power source it was working on to explore the outer planetsand has basically told planetary scientist that starting next year they need to find a new line of work if they aren't doing existing research.

Democrats and Republicans, the President, they are all to blame but to be fair they are just representing your average American. Which thinks we spend
about 1/4 of the budget on NASA, when it'll really be 0.5 percent of the budget next year. Nowhere near 1/4 percent. Quote forrelevance if you don't want to bother clicking.

Americans in general have no idea what NASA's "cost" is. In fact, most members of the public have no idea how much any government agency's budget is. What we do know - and have recently documented - is that the public perception of NASA's budget is grossly inflated relative to actual dollars. In a just-completed study, we asked respondents what percentage of the national budget is allocated to NASA ... NASA's allocation, on average, was estimated to be approximately 24% of the national budget (the NASA allocation in 2007 was approximately 0.58% of the budget.

Oh, and if you think that that was just 2007. Things haven't improved. >.> The majority of Americans think sequester budget levels for NASA are either just right, or too much. Only 38 percent of the country thinks that is too low. I'm starting to think that Americans are as stupid as everyone says we are. *facepalms*

But with the economy facing austerity measures in recent years and developing countries such as India joining the race to land a manned mission on Mars, is there still a place for the US in space?
Americans say yes. 94% of adult Americans surveyed feel it is important that NASA and the US space program are maintained. While any level of importance is felt equally across genders, men are more likely to have strength in the opinion with one in three (32%) stating it is extremely important for the United States to maintain NASA compared with one in four (23%) women.

So how much should we be funding NASA? Their 2014 budget has been set at $16 billion, the lowest since 2007. Overall, four in ten (39%) Americans think this is about right with almost the same proportion (38%) saying this is too low. Just under one in four (23%) feel this is too high.


Oh, and it isn't just NASA either. >.> Science funding in general has been cut in the United States and why? Easier to cut science spending then somewhere that matters like social spending or military budgets. *facepalms* Anyway, rate things are going Idiocracy is going to be our future. Meh.
 
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