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(CBC)   Chairman of railway that blew up a small town and killed 47 people: "I was also a victim of this whole thing. It's reduced me from being a fairly well-off guy to one that's just getting by"   (cbc.ca) divider line 99
    More: Dumbass, train drivers  
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8391 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Dec 2013 at 9:20 AM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-28 07:30:13 AM
This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?
 
2013-12-28 08:13:05 AM

Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?


I dunno.  Sounds like he's got a future at BP.
 
2013-12-28 08:19:01 AM
I'm pretty sure this guy got where he was by being an asshole and he's going out the same way.  Sort of the Rob Ford of CEOs if you will.  From day one he has pretty much said the wrong thing every time he opened his mouth.  If he'd spent a few bucks on a PR team as soon as the shiat exploded he might have come off as a victim of circumstance but at this point it just looks like dharma.
 
2013-12-28 09:23:22 AM

Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?


I thought Ronald Regan was dead.
 
2013-12-28 09:25:23 AM
A little glimpse into the heads of people of his station. Sociopathy detected.
 
2013-12-28 09:26:15 AM

TwoHead: it just looks like dharma.


images.zap2it.com
 
2013-12-28 09:28:12 AM
This interview is amazing
 
2013-12-28 09:30:36 AM
Subby's quote is genuine. Wow.
 
2013-12-28 09:31:27 AM
The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.
 
2013-12-28 09:37:28 AM

Demetrius: Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?

I dunno.  Sounds like he's got a future at BP.


He just wants his life back.
 
2013-12-28 09:38:35 AM
Isn't a train like a truck? In effect, if you shut off the engine in a truck, you cut off the air compressor, and as the air pressure bleeds off, the spring-activated brakes clamp down on the wheels, shutting the truck down in its tracks. In other words, it takes positive air pressure to open the brakes, not close them. Why would a train be any different, considering the great amount of weight (and potential for disaster) involved?
 
2013-12-28 09:39:05 AM
Well, it's true.  It's callous and probably ought never be spoken in public, but he has (apparently) suffered genuine loss from events outside his control.
 
2013-12-28 09:42:00 AM

rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.


Came to say this.

Many C level people are borderline to outright sociopaths. They are so wealthy, they have no frame of reference for connecting to "little" people - and that's what PR firms are for. Someone should have told him to check his ego at the gate and hire a PR firm to do the heavy lifting.

/He could have possibly minimized the financial damage (which was mostly dealt to his stock value), and he sure would be less reviled.
 
2013-12-28 09:42:25 AM

Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?


High-functioning sociopath. The only part that affects him is his personal financial loss - the rest is an attempt to deceive those around him as to his prior reactions and motivations.
 
2013-12-28 09:43:47 AM

rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.


If you're going to go down may as well go down trolling. Why not!
 
2013-12-28 09:44:18 AM

rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.


I've worked with someone just like this moron.  Much, much smaller scale, but everything was his when the going was great, and nothing was his when the shiat hit the fan.  Micro manager doesn't even begin to describe the level this kind of moron can screw with.  If anyone on his payroll is ever allowed to speak freely, it will probably come out that this guy was complaining/hindering maintenance, operator training, etc. by slashing budgets line by line, contradicting or outright ignoring governmental regs, and acting on the thought that no one wanted his business to succeed but him, so no ideas or thoughts mattered but his and his alone.  Sociopath.
 
2013-12-28 09:44:45 AM

Demetrius: Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?

I dunno.  Sounds like he's got a future at BP.


assets.nydailynews.com
 
2013-12-28 09:44:52 AM
Some thoughts should be kept to oneself or a small circle of friends.
 
2013-12-28 09:46:03 AM

Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?


===============

Been my personal observation of wealthy people.....people I've worked for....that most have sociopathic tendencies, if they are not full blown sociopaths.  So is this guy totally lacking in empathy?  Uh, yeah.   They are no different than serial killers.  When they are caught, and asked if they are sorry, they usually reply, "Sure I'm sorry!  Sorry I got caught."  Oh, how they suffer.
 
2013-12-28 09:46:32 AM

Fear the Clam: Demetrius: Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?

I dunno.  Sounds like he's got a future at BP.

[assets.nydailynews.com image 635x477]


came here to post

"we're sorry for the massive disruption it's caused to their lives. There's no one who wants this thing over more than I do, I'd like my life back."
 
2013-12-28 09:47:55 AM

rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.


This is kinda my take on it as well. Obviously, I don't know the guy, and he may very well be a prick. But maybe not. I dunno.

shiat happens, and there's not always someone to directly blame.
 
ecl
2013-12-28 09:48:46 AM
www.duramaxforum.com
thankyoueurope.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-12-28 09:51:21 AM

HAMMERTOE: Isn't a train like a truck? In effect, if you shut off the engine in a truck, you cut off the air compressor, and as the air pressure bleeds off, the spring-activated brakes clamp down on the wheels, shutting the truck down in its tracks. In other words, it takes positive air pressure to open the brakes, not close them. Why would a train be any different, considering the great amount of weight (and potential for disaster) involved?


Probably. But those brakes have to be in proper working order to do that well enough in an emergency like what happened. Based off of the oil being mislabeled as something less volatile, I severely doubt that the train was well maintained, let alone in proper working order as required by regulations.

We will see what the investigation finds.

/maintenance is considered a red line item by many managers
/it is actually a required cost of using technology
 
2013-12-28 09:54:24 AM

GibbyTheMole: rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.

This is kinda my take on it as well. Obviously, I don't know the guy, and he may very well be a prick. But maybe not. I dunno.

shiat happens, and there's not always someone to directly blame.


Lac Megantic was a horror show. The explosions and fireballs went on for hours. Nobody wants to hear how this asshole's wallet was affected.
 
2013-12-28 09:54:52 AM
I think we've found out what happened to James Taggart.
 
2013-12-28 09:55:22 AM

Warlordtrooper: rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.

If you're going to go down may as well go down trolling. Why not!


That is not a troll.  That is a reasonable assessment of the situation.
 
2013-12-28 09:55:35 AM

HAMMERTOE: Isn't a train like a truck? In effect, if you shut off the engine in a truck, you cut off the air compressor, and as the air pressure bleeds off, the spring-activated brakes clamp down on the wheels, shutting the truck down in its tracks. In other words, it takes positive air pressure to open the brakes, not close them. Why would a train be any different, considering the great amount of weight (and potential for disaster) involved?


AFAIK some train air brakes don't have the spring bit, and rely on separate handbrakes for keeping the train stopped without brake pressure. So you have "fail safe" air brakes that eventually release themselves if the pressure is cut off for several hours...

/ Not an engineer, so YMMV
 
2013-12-28 09:56:42 AM
Speaking of BP, that whole thing just kinda petered out, didn't it?
 
2013-12-28 09:57:24 AM
cherryl taggart:
I've worked with someone just like this moron.  Much, much smaller scale, but everything was his when the going was great, and nothing was his when the shiat hit the fan.  Micro manager doesn't even begin to describe the level this kind of moron can screw with.  If anyone on his payroll is ever allowed to speak freely, it will probably come out that this guy was complaining/hindering maintenance, operator training, etc. by slashing budgets line by line, contradicting or outright ignoring governmental regs, and acting on the thought that no one wanted his business to succeed but him, so no ideas or thoughts mattered but his and his alone.  Sociopath.

Jim Collins wrote in his book "Good to Great" about the elements that make up a great leader (in his book, called "Level-5"), of any organization, be it business or otherwise.
One critical element was called "The Window and The Mirror" and can be used to quickly determine, through a short conversation, whether a person is a great leader, or just good at their job.
When a person talks about why things are going well within the organization, he will look out the window and credit the team.  When things go poorly, he will look in the mirror and cite his own failures, and learn from them.
A sociopath will do the exact opposite.
It takes a great leader to make an enduring company, organization, club, nation, or practically any other worthwhile group.  One who will look to himself to find the screw-ups and will look to his team to find the successes.  I don't know this guy personally, and I won't judge based on comments made in a time of grief.  But at the end of the day, he's a railroad man, not a PR man.  He needs to hire a PR contractor and maybe he can get out of this with nothing lost but his shirt.
 
2013-12-28 09:58:14 AM

HAMMERTOE: Isn't a train like a truck? In effect, if you shut off the engine in a truck, you cut off the air compressor, and as the air pressure bleeds off, the spring-activated brakes clamp down on the wheels, shutting the truck down in its tracks. In other words, it takes positive air pressure to open the brakes, not close them. Why would a train be any different, considering the great amount of weight (and potential for disaster) involved?


Well, several things. Some trailers, notably heavy-haul trailers (the low-boy trailers for heavy equipment), are exempt from having spring-activated parking brakes; they use an air tank to hold the parking brakes, but the driver is supposed to chock the trailer for long-term parking.

A railroad person needs to chime in here, but from what I understand, the practice is to leave the air on the train, and set a certain number of hand brakes when "parking" a train that will be unattended. Railroad air brakes, from what I have read, are way more complicated than truck air brakes, which are complicated enough (you have both braking air and control air, and now you have ABS in truck brakes, and you are starting to see electronic stability and anti-jackknifing automation).
 
2013-12-28 10:00:37 AM
Completely missing the point. He had as much to do with the derailment as a pilot has to do with a crash in a systems failure situation. Terrible tragedy, but he's the wrong target. Personally, I appreciate straight shooters much more than some douchebag PR guy who is straight up lying to smooth out a bad situation. I'm sure he only brought up money because he was asked about it, not to shove it anyone's face. He may, however, be a douchebag anyway. I don't know him.

Nonetheless, RIP to those lost in LM. Unspeakable tragedy.
 
2013-12-28 10:01:33 AM

Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?


Regardless of the inanity of his quote, IF he really was knocked down from wealthy to "getting by," that's more of a burden than I would have expected.  (Not necessarily more than I think he deserves, but that's a different discussion).  Maybe Canada is different, but how often do you hear about the actual captains of industry taking a class-changing hit?  Even the Wall Street guys who took the fall for 2008 are probably still worth tens if not hundreds of millions.
 
2013-12-28 10:04:40 AM
He thinks he's in a bad spot?  He should be happy he didn't end up like this guy.

content7.flixster.com

/Too obscure?
 
2013-12-28 10:05:14 AM

God Is My Co-Pirate: Lac Megantic was a horror show. The explosions and fireballs went on for hours. Nobody wants to hear how this asshole's wallet was affected.


When you invest your entire life into building something like that, you've pored more emotional attachment into that business than you would a child.  Nobody wants to see their child die.  He thinks he just did.  Or at least, he sees it on life support.

There was a man in my hometown where I grew up who lost his business to a fire.  It was just a freak accident but within a couple months he had sunk into depression and alcoholism before killing himself.  To him, that ready-mix plant was his life.  The guy was still a prick, and the town was better off without him, but that doesn't make his emotions, nor what he did based on them, any less real.
 
2013-12-28 10:05:27 AM

Ima4nic8or: Warlordtrooper: rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.

If you're going to go down may as well go down trolling. Why not!

That is not a troll.  That is a reasonable assessment of the situation.


Oh I was referring to the manager not the guy I quoted
 
2013-12-28 10:06:04 AM

rolladuck: The Dumbass part can be summed up in the fact that he is still speaking directly to the public and has not hired a publicist to handle all his PR matters for him.
His company is in shambles now, and it is truly devastating to a person to see someone that you spent 30 or 40 years building literally go up in a fireball.  But his message will always be received by the people who lost family members, and the message they will perceive is, "My financial loss is almost as tragic your personal loss."
But logically speaking, he wasn't solely to blame for the tragedy.  He didn't even have a significant role.  He owned a train that caught fire, and through a series of operator errors and unpredictable emergency response actions, ended up killing people.
The outrage we're seeing here is emotionally devastated humans acting in a mob-like fashion to punish the loudest possible scapegoat.  He needs to shut up, so that they don't lash out even more at him.


Soley to blame?  No, probably not.

Responsible in part for lobbying the federal government (a.k.a. the "gotta let industries self-regulate because free market rulez!" Harper Conservaties) to allow them an exemption to use only a single operator on their trains to save on salary?  Sure.  Responsible for allowing the secondary track to be used for storing excess cargo instead of its intended use in order to save on storage costs?  Sure.

He and his company cut corners to fatten up their wallets and a small town paid for it.
 
2013-12-28 10:10:25 AM

Unobtanium: HAMMERTOE: Isn't a train like a truck? In effect, if you shut off the engine in a truck, you cut off the air compressor, and as the air pressure bleeds off, the spring-activated brakes clamp down on the wheels, shutting the truck down in its tracks. In other words, it takes positive air pressure to open the brakes, not close them. Why would a train be any different, considering the great amount of weight (and potential for disaster) involved?

Well, several things. Some trailers, notably heavy-haul trailers (the low-boy trailers for heavy equipment), are exempt from having spring-activated parking brakes; they use an air tank to hold the parking brakes, but the driver is supposed to chock the trailer for long-term parking.

A railroad person needs to chime in here, but from what I understand, the practice is to leave the air on the train, and set a certain number of hand brakes when "parking" a train that will be unattended. Railroad air brakes, from what I have read, are way more complicated than truck air brakes, which are complicated enough (you have both braking air and control air, and now you have ABS in truck brakes, and you are starting to see electronic stability and anti-jackknifing automation).


Yeah, it's a different dynamic. Train brakes are tricky. Having brakes activate when they shouldn't is as dangerous as having them fail outright.
 
2013-12-28 10:12:35 AM

HAMMERTOE: Isn't a train like a truck? In effect, if you shut off the engine in a truck, you cut off the air compressor, and as the air pressure bleeds off, the spring-activated brakes clamp down on the wheels, shutting the truck down in its tracks. In other words, it takes positive air pressure to open the brakes, not close them. Why would a train be any different, considering the great amount of weight (and potential for disaster) involved?


So you're suggesting that in the case of legitimate brake, the train has a way of shutting that whole thing down?
 
2013-12-28 10:12:57 AM

Romanes Eunt Domus: Soley to blame? No, probably not.

Responsible in part for lobbying the federal government (a.k.a. the "gotta let industries self-regulate because free market rulez!" Harper Conservaties) to allow them an exemption to use only a single operator on their trains to save on salary? Sure. Responsible for allowing the secondary track to be used for storing excess cargo instead of its intended use in order to save on storage costs? Sure.

He and his company cut corners to fatten up their wallets and a small town paid for it.


I was only aware of the immediate surrounding area of the tragedy.  I see it like this:

If you receive the right to self-regulate, then you and your industry partners assume the risk for the failures.  The free market does rule.
If you allow the government to regulate, then the government is to blame when the regulations fail to prevent a tragedy.
He tried to self-regulate, and he then tried to be cheap.  In trying to be cheap, he lost his shirt.  He fails, his business collapses, and he is, indeed a victim of his own ineptitude.  If what you've said is true, (and I've got means to dispute it) then the free market has spoken and chosen to kick him out.

May he be cast into the street to live like a beggar, and may his story be an example to others who would do such things.  The free market does not forgive.
 
2013-12-28 10:16:24 AM

Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?


TwoHead: I'm pretty sure this guy got where he was by being an asshole and he's going out the same way.  Sort of the Rob Ford of CEOs if you will.  From day one he has pretty much said the wrong thing every time he opened his mouth.  If he'd spent a few bucks on a PR team as soon as the shiat exploded he might have come off as a victim of circumstance but at this point it just looks like dharma.


From TFA:

He added, however, that he wasn't complaining about the hit he took to his bottom line, insisting he didn't want to criticize the people of Lac-Mégantic because "they went through hell."

"[Financial losses are] not in the same category as the personal losses, the deaths and all of that, that people suffered in Lac-Mégantic," he said.

Burkhardt's frequently blunt remarks, often lacking public-relations massaging and sentimentalism, made him public enemy No. 1 last summer in Lac-Mégantic.

His brief stop in the town in the aftermath is perhaps best-remembered for his tumultuous news conference, during which he was heckled by irate locals.

Burkhardt, who also faced criticism for waiting more than four days before visiting the town after the crash, had anticipated the rough reception. He defended his delayed appearance, saying he was dealing with the crisis from his office.   Before travelling to Lac-Mégantic, Burkhardt even quipped that he'd probably have to wear a bulletproof vest during his visit.

Burkhardt displayed his straight-shooting style in the middle of the news conference when a reporter asked him how much he was worth, financially. He replied: "A whole lot less than I was Saturday [the day of the derailment]."

Reflecting on his reputation in Lac-Mégantic, Burkhardt believes local anger was directed at him because, as chairman, he was the voice of the company. "I think I assumed too much of a personal role up there, so I guess I was the magnet for all of the people's unhappiness, which is not terribly surprising," the railway boss said.

He then repeated an allegation he first made publicly at that July news conference: the train driver didn't do his job properly the night of the disaster.  "They view me terribly, but I wasn't the guy who didn't set the brakes on the train," he said.


It appears he gets that his financial losses are not equivalent to the losses suffered by the residents of Lac-Mégantic, but why would he bother to discuss his finances at all?  He could simply pass on the question, saying "You know, I don't want to talk about my personal situation. It's irrelevant, and pales in comparison to what Lac-Mégantic has suffered."

So, he's still a jerk, but not a Marie Antoinette-level jerk.
 
2013-12-28 10:17:19 AM
That Bakken crude is still being hauled all over the country in the same cars every day.  About ten of those trains go by my office every day and it scares the crap out of me.  The biggest reason there isn't a pipeline coming out of the area is that the rail union is bigger than the pipe fitters union, and that's a fact.  I'd much rather deal with a pipeline spill than a town being blown up again.
 
2013-12-28 10:18:17 AM

rolladuck: Romanes Eunt Domus: Soley to blame? No, probably not.

Responsible in part for lobbying the federal government (a.k.a. the "gotta let industries self-regulate because free market rulez!" Harper Conservaties) to allow them an exemption to use only a single operator on their trains to save on salary? Sure. Responsible for allowing the secondary track to be used for storing excess cargo instead of its intended use in order to save on storage costs? Sure.

He and his company cut corners to fatten up their wallets and a small town paid for it.

I was only aware of the immediate surrounding area of the tragedy.  I see it like this:

If you receive the right to self-regulate, then you and your industry partners assume the risk for the failures.  The free market does rule.
If you allow the government to regulate, then the government is to blame when the regulations fail to prevent a tragedy.
He tried to self-regulate, and he then tried to be cheap.  In trying to be cheap, he lost his shirt.  He fails, his business collapses, and he is, indeed a victim of his own ineptitude.  If what you've said is true, (and I've got means to dispute it) then the free market has spoken and chosen to kick him out.

May he be cast into the street to live like a beggar, and may his story be an example to others who would do such things.  The free market does not forgive.


Full disclosure: I'm going off of what I remember from the articles that were written at the time by a number of different sources (primarily the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, and CBC's site).  I may not possess an eidetic memory but I do recall certain facts as they were presented in those articles and those were the ones I mentioned above.

If you provide any credible sources that can offer contrary evidence, I would be interested in reading them.
 
2013-12-28 10:18:30 AM

rolladuck: Romanes Eunt Domus: Soley to blame? No, probably not.

Responsible in part for lobbying the federal government (a.k.a. the "gotta let industries self-regulate because free market rulez!" Harper Conservaties) to allow them an exemption to use only a single operator on their trains to save on salary? Sure. Responsible for allowing the secondary track to be used for storing excess cargo instead of its intended use in order to save on storage costs? Sure.

He and his company cut corners to fatten up their wallets and a small town paid for it.

I was only aware of the immediate surrounding area of the tragedy.  I see it like this:

If you receive the right to self-regulate, then you and your industry partners assume the risk for the failures.  The free market does rule.
If you allow the government to regulate, then the government is to blame when the regulations fail to prevent a tragedy.
He tried to self-regulate, and he then tried to be cheap.  In trying to be cheap, he lost his shirt.  He fails, his business collapses, and he is, indeed a victim of his own ineptitude.  If what you've said is true, (and I've got means to dispute it) then the free market has spoken and chosen to kick him out.

May he be cast into the street to live like a beggar, and may his story be an example to others who would do such things.  The free market does not forgive.


This kind of error, where no doubt multiple mistakes were made, is in deed the type of disaster that ruins companies and their management. Theres nothing wrong with that.

Some accidents are hard to reduce to zero probability, this was not that kind of accident.
 
2013-12-28 10:21:12 AM
 
2013-12-28 10:27:15 AM

Yankees Team Gynecologist: Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?

Regardless of the inanity of his quote, IF he really was knocked down from wealthy to "getting by," that's more of a burden than I would have expected.  (Not necessarily more than I think he deserves, but that's a different discussion).  Maybe Canada is different, but how often do you hear about the actual captains of industry taking a class-changing hit?  Even the Wall Street guys who took the fall for 2008 are probably still worth tens if not hundreds of millions.


This guy is exactly the same as them. He'll have to sell his boat and one of his vacation houses (probably the Mexican one,  selling the Muskoka one will remove him from crucial networking opportunities which he needs more than ever), then he'll get hired at some other company after selling his board stake back to the rest of them at a sweetheart price which will constitute "working for a living" but for all practical purposes nothing will change at all. The guy likely still has millions of dollars.

Railroads was the classic Ayn Rand business.
 
2013-12-28 10:32:46 AM

Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?


Tony Hayward.
 
2013-12-28 10:33:17 AM

Doc Batarang: Yankees Team Gynecologist: Speaker2Animals: This has to be satire, right? Nobody is that lacking in awareness, right?

Regardless of the inanity of his quote, IF he really was knocked down from wealthy to "getting by," that's more of a burden than I would have expected.  (Not necessarily more than I think he deserves, but that's a different discussion).  Maybe Canada is different, but how often do you hear about the actual captains of industry taking a class-changing hit?  Even the Wall Street guys who took the fall for 2008 are probably still worth tens if not hundreds of millions.

This guy is exactly the same as them. He'll have to sell his boat and one of his vacation houses (probably the Mexican one,  selling the Muskoka one will remove him from crucial networking opportunities which he needs more than ever), then he'll get hired at some other company after selling his board stake back to the rest of them at a sweetheart price which will constitute "working for a living" but for all practical purposes nothing will change at all. The guy likely still has millions of dollars.

Railroads was the classic Ayn Rand business.


Yeah, that's why I put "if" in caps--I figured it probably was not really the case.
 
2013-12-28 10:33:50 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

/hot
 
2013-12-28 10:34:01 AM

Animatronik: This kind of error, where no doubt multiple mistakes were made, is in deed the type of disaster that ruins companies and their management. Theres nothing wrong with that.

Some accidents are hard to reduce to zero probability, this was not that kind of accident.


Indeed.  I work at a plant that makes two and a half million pounds of explosives per day, to be used for fertilizer.  But make no mistake, though the product is intended for fertilizer, it will explode, asphyxiate, freeze, a person all at once, in addition to the other horrible things it can do.  But we control it, and all the processes very tightly.  We don't do work unless we KNOW that it is safe to do so.  We stop production if we SUSPECT it is dangerous to keep running.  We have built those tight procedural safeguards into every part of our plant.  We have made a fully-coordinated effort, that is supported by our management and the company owners, to prevent safety and environmental mishaps.  And we have had a record year in doing so.
Disasters can't be eliminated with proper management and a leadership attitude of "Doing It Right".  But they can be reduced significantly.
My company has gone all in with it, and we've reaped the rewards.  I suspect others will be copying us shortly.
 
2013-12-28 10:35:01 AM
Is this a repeat? That's almost exactly what he claimed last summer when he was trying to make nice with the locals and their dead kin. So nobody between then and now told him, "Listen, shut the fark up about how you're a victim here, nobody cares about you and if you're suffering they'll probably be glad for it. Just say you're sorry and go the fark home."
 
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