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(MIT)   Math is hard. Let's go dancing   (web.mit.edu ) divider line
    More: Silly, applied mathematicses, maths, Math is hard, Number Theory, first dance, electrical engineering and computer science, graduate studies, Algebra  
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2733 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Dec 2013 at 11:04 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-27 11:08:21 AM  
photos1.blogger.com

Other subjects can be a challenge, too.
 
2013-12-27 11:12:40 AM  
I wouldn't mind being tangent to her curves.
 
2013-12-27 11:21:21 AM  
You can math if you want to, you can leave your friends behind.
 
2013-12-27 11:33:51 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-27 11:44:17 AM  
I think mine was just the opposite - I was good at math from an early age, and I think that helped when I took up the clarinet a few years later.  It's a fairly common belief that math and music/dance are related.
 
2013-12-27 11:55:24 AM  

Arkanaut: I wouldn't mind being tangent to her curves.


You're sick! She's just a little child trying to learn to read!
 
2013-12-27 12:01:18 PM  
acidcow.com
 
2013-12-27 12:08:38 PM  

AngryDragon: [i.imgur.com image 510x352]


hogans: [photos1.blogger.com image 400x399]

Other subjects can be a challenge, too.


Wow, between this and the community college thread, there's a lot of discussions about strippers.
 
2013-12-27 12:13:26 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-12-27 12:22:50 PM  

RedPhoenix122: You can math if you want to, you can leave your friends behind.


Because your friends don't math and if they don't math, well, they're no friends of mine?

/nice!
 
2013-12-27 12:25:21 PM  
Nothing silly about dance, until I took up Ballroom dance I was a real wallflower, but being able to cut a rug does give confidence.
 
2013-12-27 01:36:39 PM  

Needlessly Complicated: RedPhoenix122: You can math if you want to, you can leave your friends behind.

Because your friends don't math and if they don't math, well, they're no friends of mine?

/nice!


Perfect geometric proof
 
2013-12-27 01:36:54 PM  
im.rediff.com

She's cute. Would love to see her work the pole.
 
2013-12-27 03:18:54 PM  

Arkanaut: AngryDragon: [i.imgur.com image 510x352]

hogans: [photos1.blogger.com image 400x399]

Other subjects can be a challenge, too.

Wow, between this and the community college thread, there's a lot of discussions about strippers.


'Tis the season
 
2013-12-27 06:55:08 PM  
i1.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-12-27 06:58:36 PM  
it worked for me so it will work for everyone !

/this doesn't add up
 
2013-12-27 07:09:28 PM  
FTA: 'Why doesn't it ever bother you that you're the only girl, or that guys don't everyone doesn't think it's cool if you're good at math?'"

Fixed for accuracy

Sinha recalls. "And I never had a good answer."

There are no good or bad answers when it comes to math, only correct and incorrect.
 
2013-12-27 07:13:24 PM  
I have something like 45 hours of college math. While most of my classes were majority guys, the few chics in class were just as good (if not better) at problem solving. At the office, the girls that bothered to learn calculus are generally far more focused when completing projects.

I'm not ripping on the dancer for her methods; I applaud every effort to introduce students to new ideas. I'm just saying every student should have  this essay read to them in kindergarten.

There is no gender bias in any subject. That line of bullsh*t was written by someone too lazy learn math. A thousand years from now, the concept of "subject matter gender bias" will be included in the same anthology as Greek Mythology.
 
2013-12-27 07:19:38 PM  

MJMaloney187: I have something like 45 hours of college math. While most of my classes were majority guys, the few broads in class were just as good (if not better) at problem solving. At the office, the girls that bothered to learn calculus are generally far more focused when completing projects.

I'm not ripping on the dancer for her methods; I applaud every effort to introduce students to new ideas. I'm just saying every student should have  this essay read to them in kindergarten.

There is no gender bias in any subject. That line of bullshiat was written by someone too lazy to learn math. A thousand years from now, the concept of "subject matter gender bias" will be included in the same anthology as Greek Mythology.


FTFM
 
2013-12-27 08:31:47 PM  

Hyjamon: There are no good or bad answers when it comes to math, only correct and incorrect.


If you are solving an algebra problem, yes. But mathematicians tend to work at a slightly higher level than that.
 
2013-12-27 09:49:35 PM  

MJMaloney187: There is no gender bias in any subject. That line of bullsh*t was written by someone too lazy learn math. A thousand years from now, the concept of "subject matter gender bias" will be included in the same anthology as Greek Mythology.


yes and no.  A few decades ago, women were discouraged from STEM careers.  Granted, those beliefs are fading, but there are still some old male teachers who still project that message.  But the curriculum is still favored to appeal to the male gender.

Most robots and robotic kits are very masculine in nature and resemble bugs, scorpions, mechs, terminators, claws, battlebots, snakes:

solidsmack.com

compared to some of the other less popular kits out there like building a robotic cake, or night lights.

male and female genders view the world differently and we need to create STEM curriculum that caters to both; instead of engineering classes only building bridges or buildings, also work on prosthetic design or disaster management.  Projects that appeal to the nurturing tendency of the female gender.

Men do better in CAD classes due to having higher spatial reasoning ability which come from the fact that males tend to play with legos and building blocks more then females when they are younger. Lego only recently starting to make products to appeal to girls.

And lets not even talk about video games and the audience they appeal too; although I think the next generation will see that come to balance with social games like farmville et. al.

We have come a long way of no longer having male teachers telling female students they can't do science and math.  Next step is creating a curriculum that can foster female interest.

/heavily using the word gender and not sex.
 
2013-12-27 10:53:06 PM  

WTP 2: it worked for me so it will work for everyone !

/this doesn't add up


NOTHING works for all students. That's one of the huge, glaring flaws in our current system.
 
2013-12-28 12:31:27 AM  

KJUW89: I think mine was just the opposite - I was good at math from an early age, and I think that helped when I took up the clarinet a few years later.  It's a fairly common belief that math and music/dance are related.


Yep.  Just about every mathematician and physicist I know is also a musician.  Some even at the professional or near professional level.

/physicist and mathematicians also seem to speak more languages than average, too
 
2013-12-28 12:42:12 AM  

Hyjamon: MJMaloney187: There is no gender bias in any subject. That line of bullsh*t was written by someone too lazy learn math. A thousand years from now, the concept of "subject matter gender bias" will be included in the same anthology as Greek Mythology.

yes and no.  A few decades ago, women were discouraged from STEM careers.  Granted, those beliefs are fading, but there are still some old male teachers who still project that message.  But the curriculum is still favored to appeal to the male gender.

Most robots and robotic kits are very masculine in nature and resemble bugs, scorpions, mechs, terminators, claws, battlebots, snakes:

[solidsmack.com image 850x598]

compared to some of the other less popular kits out there like building a robotic cake, or night lights.

male and female genders view the world differently and we need to create STEM curriculum that caters to both; instead of engineering classes only building bridges or buildings, also work on prosthetic design or disaster management.  Projects that appeal to the nurturing tendency of the female gender.

Men do better in CAD classes due to having higher spatial reasoning ability which come from the fact that males tend to play with legos and building blocks more then females when they are younger. Lego only recently starting to make products to appeal to girls.

And lets not even talk about video games and the audience they appeal too; although I think the next generation will see that come to balance with social games like farmville et. al.

We have come a long way of no longer having male teachers telling female students they can't do science and math.  Next step is creating a curriculum that can foster female interest.

/heavily using the word gender and not sex.



I accept that you're not a troll and that you're not trying to offend anyone here, but your post seriously pissed me off.

First of all, I'm a female physicist and I'm not any more "nurturing" than my mathematician husband (who is, by far, the better parent of the two of us).

I have ZERO interest in biology or life sciences or even applying physics to biological systems (biophysics).

My spatial reasoning skills would put most men's to shame, including my husband's (and his are better than the male average).  When we need to parallel park our car, I am the one who does it; he can't do it.

The physics curriculum as is was enough to "foster" my interest in physics.  Physics is cool.  It doesn't need a gimmick to attract people to the field.
 
2013-12-28 01:07:43 AM  

FizixJunkee: Hyjamon: MJMaloney187: There is no gender bias in any subject. That line of bullsh*t was written by someone too lazy learn math. A thousand years from now, the concept of "subject matter gender bias" will be included in the same anthology as Greek Mythology.

yes and no.  A few decades ago, women were discouraged from STEM careers.  Granted, those beliefs are fading, but there are still some old male teachers who still project that message.  But the curriculum is still favored to appeal to the male gender.

Most robots and robotic kits are very masculine in nature and resemble bugs, scorpions, mechs, terminators, claws, battlebots, snakes:

[solidsmack.com image 850x598]

compared to some of the other less popular kits out there like building a robotic cake, or night lights.

male and female genders view the world differently and we need to create STEM curriculum that caters to both; instead of engineering classes only building bridges or buildings, also work on prosthetic design or disaster management.  Projects that appeal to the nurturing tendency of the female gender.

Men do better in CAD classes due to having higher spatial reasoning ability which come from the fact that males tend to play with legos and building blocks more then females when they are younger. Lego only recently starting to make products to appeal to girls.

And lets not even talk about video games and the audience they appeal too; although I think the next generation will see that come to balance with social games like farmville et. al.

We have come a long way of no longer having male teachers telling female students they can't do science and math.  Next step is creating a curriculum that can foster female interest.

/heavily using the word gender and not sex.


I accept that you're not a troll and that you're not trying to offend anyone here, but your post seriously pissed me off.

First of all, I'm a female physicist and I'm not any more "nurturing" than my mathematician husband (who is, by far, the better parent of the two of us).

I have ZERO interest in biology or life sciences or even applying physics to biological systems (biophysics).

My spatial reasoning skills would put most men's to shame, including my husband's (and his are better than the male average).  When we need to parallel park our car, I am the one who does it; he can't do it.

The physics curriculum as is was enough to "foster" my interest in physics.  Physics is cool.  It doesn't need a gimmick to attract people to the field.


Aaaannndddd, here's the lady at the very edge of the Bell curve. Welcome!
 
2013-12-28 01:42:16 AM  

95BV5: Aaaannndddd, here's the lady at the very edge of the Bell curve. Welcome!


The men I know in physics and math also tend to be on the ends of their respective bell curves, too.
 
2013-12-28 01:50:34 AM  
Dancing is hard, let's do math!
 
2013-12-28 10:48:46 AM  
Dance is hard, let's see sunny bust a move.
 
2013-12-28 11:43:22 AM  

FizixJunkee: I accept that you're not a troll and that you're not trying to offend anyone here, but your post seriously pissed me off.


nope not a troll, in fact attended a week long seminar sponsored by the NSF to share their findings and studies on increasing female interest in STEM fields.  You are what is called an outlier.  We are focused on the 'stereotypical' females who bleed glitter.  Are there current females that do fine with the curriculum as designed, yes, are they a majority, no.

I imagine your physics classes were not 60% female and 40% male which is the typical population of most colleges.  That is the goal we need to achieve.

for example:

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/11/20/project-based-learning -c ould-help-attract-and-retain-women-stem-study-suggests
 
2013-12-28 04:55:42 PM  

Hyjamon: FizixJunkee: I accept that you're not a troll and that you're not trying to offend anyone here, but your post seriously pissed me off.

nope not a troll, in fact attended a week long seminar sponsored by the NSF to share their findings and studies on increasing female interest in STEM fields.  You are what is called an outlier.  We are focused on the 'stereotypical' females who bleed glitter.  Are there current females that do fine with the curriculum as designed, yes, are they a majority, no.

I imagine your physics classes were not 60% female and 40% male which is the typical population of most colleges.  That is the goal we need to achieve.


Hey, make sure to use the bolded line if you have any speaking parts at that conference, Comrade Hyjamon.

And why exactly do we "need to achieve" the goal of 60:40? That's a very strange goal.
 
2013-12-28 05:46:07 PM  

MJMaloney187: Hyjamon: FizixJunkee: I accept that you're not a troll and that you're not trying to offend anyone here, but your post seriously pissed me off.

nope not a troll, in fact attended a week long seminar sponsored by the NSF to share their findings and studies on increasing female interest in STEM fields.  You are what is called an outlier.  We are focused on the 'stereotypical' females who bleed glitter.  Are there current females that do fine with the curriculum as designed, yes, are they a majority, no.

I imagine your physics classes were not 60% female and 40% male which is the typical population of most colleges.  That is the goal we need to achieve.

Hey, make sure to use the bolded line if you have any speaking parts at that conference, Comrade Hyjamon.

And why exactly do we "need to achieve" the goal of 60:40? That's a very strange goal.


lol, I will try to work it in, but that is close to the line I heard at the seminar I attended, where there was a focus on the typical female student and not the outlying ones who were interested in techniques that appeal to males.  For example: collaborative vs. competitive assignments.  Also, avoid pairing male and females together early on in a semester to avoid the male dominating an assignment due to familiarity with the subject or tools (think auto-tech or carpentry)

College populations are close to 60% female and 40% male, yet in STEM majors, it is about 25% female and 75% male.  So why are these majors not even close to the general population?  Are we to assume that females can't do science or is it safer to assume that science in the way it is approached does not appeal to females?
 
2013-12-28 10:06:15 PM  

Hyjamon: MJMaloney187: Hyjamon: FizixJunkee: I accept that you're not a troll and that you're not trying to offend anyone here, but your post seriously pissed me off.

nope not a troll, in fact attended a week long seminar sponsored by the NSF to share their findings and studies on increasing female interest in STEM fields.  You are what is called an outlier.  We are focused on the 'stereotypical' females who bleed glitter.  Are there current females that do fine with the curriculum as designed, yes, are they a majority, no.

I imagine your physics classes were not 60% female and 40% male which is the typical population of most colleges.  That is the goal we need to achieve.

Hey, make sure to use the bolded line if you have any speaking parts at that conference, Comrade Hyjamon.

And why exactly do we "need to achieve" the goal of 60:40? That's a very strange goal.

lol, I will try to work it in, but that is close to the line I heard at the seminar I attended, where there was a focus on the typical female student and not the outlying ones who were interested in techniques that appeal to males.  For example: collaborative vs. competitive assignments.  Also, avoid pairing male and females together early on in a semester to avoid the male dominating an assignment due to familiarity with the subject or tools (think auto-tech or carpentry)

College populations are close to 60% female and 40% male, yet in STEM majors, it is about 25% female and 75% male.  So why are these majors not even close to the general population?  Are we to assume that females can't do science or is it safer to assume that science in the way it is approached does not appeal to females?


Sounds to me like the girls are already evenly distributed among college majors.

I'm not sure how to ask you this without sounding confrontational (because I'm not), but are you a black muslim?
 
2013-12-28 10:10:01 PM  

Hyjamon: For example: collaborative vs. competitive assignments.


As an introvert, I would absolute DETEST having to do collaborative assignments (e.g., group projects).

/female physicist
 
2013-12-28 10:20:19 PM  

MJMaloney187: Hyjamon: MJMaloney187: Hyjamon: FizixJunkee: I accept that you're not a troll and that you're not trying to offend anyone here, but your post seriously pissed me off.

nope not a troll, in fact attended a week long seminar sponsored by the NSF to share their findings and studies on increasing female interest in STEM fields.  You are what is called an outlier.  We are focused on the 'stereotypical' females who bleed glitter.  Are there current females that do fine with the curriculum as designed, yes, are they a majority, no.

I imagine your physics classes were not 60% female and 40% male which is the typical population of most colleges.  That is the goal we need to achieve.

Hey, make sure to use the bolded line if you have any speaking parts at that conference, Comrade Hyjamon.

And why exactly do we "need to achieve" the goal of 60:40? That's a very strange goal.

lol, I will try to work it in, but that is close to the line I heard at the seminar I attended, where there was a focus on the typical female student and not the outlying ones who were interested in techniques that appeal to males.  For example: collaborative vs. competitive assignments.  Also, avoid pairing male and females together early on in a semester to avoid the male dominating an assignment due to familiarity with the subject or tools (think auto-tech or carpentry)

College populations are close to 60% female and 40% male, yet in STEM majors, it is about 25% female and 75% male.  So why are these majors not even close to the general population?  Are we to assume that females can't do science or is it safer to assume that science in the way it is approached does not appeal to females?

Sounds to me like the girls are already evenly distributed among college majors.


Curious how you think that having 25% of STEM majors being female is well balanced when 60% of all students are female.  If there were equal distribution, then all majors should be close to 60% female, which STEM is no where close to.

I'm not sure how to ask you this without sounding confrontational (because I'm not), but are you a black muslim?

nope, I am your typical white male oppressor.
 
2013-12-28 10:26:49 PM  

FizixJunkee: Hyjamon: For example: collaborative vs. competitive assignments.

As an introvert, I would absolute DETEST having to do collaborative assignments (e.g., group projects).

/female physicist


I am with you on this..hated group projects since it always turns into the smart one in the group does the work because 1) they are able and 2) the want an A, whereas the rest of the group is okay with a C.  But introverts should learn how to work in groups/be a little bit extroverted since it will come up in their careers.

but there are extroverts in the classroom as well and they should have curriculum that appeals to them as well.  And again, with gendering, men do well in competitive environments i.e. you vs. them due to games boys are encouraged to play (war, cowboys vs. indians, sports, etc.) whereas women are encouraged to play with dolls (nuturing activity), play house, host tea parties (social activity/collaboration)

I remember a math teacher of mine listening to us complain about some of the liberal arts classes we had to take and he said something along the lines of this:  "You study arts, history and literature in order to have something to talk about at social functions where you will need to ask for money for grants."
 
2013-12-28 10:42:29 PM  

Hyjamon: College populations are close to 60% female and 40% male, yet in STEM majors, it is about 25% female and 75% male.  So why are these majors not even close to the general population?  Are we to assume that females can't do science or is it safer to assume that science in the way it is approached does not appeal to females?

Sounds to me like the girls are already evenly distributed among college majors.

Curious how you think that having 25% of STEM majors being female is well balanced when 60% of all students are female.  If there were equal distribution, then all majors should be close to 60% female, which STEM is no where close to.


Ok, well I appreciate your not getting pissed for me asking. It's just that you have a very bizarre way of seeing things.

100 students. 60 chics and 40 dudes.

15 of those chics are enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and math. The other 45 are distributed similarly throughout the other college programs: 15 in education, 15 in the arts, and 15 in finance. That's pretty evenly distributed.
 
2013-12-28 11:01:30 PM  

MJMaloney187: Hyjamon: College populations are close to 60% female and 40% male, yet in STEM majors, it is about 25% female and 75% male.  So why are these majors not even close to the general population?  Are we to assume that females can't do science or is it safer to assume that science in the way it is approached does not appeal to females?

Sounds to me like the girls are already evenly distributed among college majors.

Curious how you think that having 25% of STEM majors being female is well balanced when 60% of all students are female.  If there were equal distribution, then all majors should be close to 60% female, which STEM is no where close to.

Ok, well I appreciate your not getting pissed for me asking. It's just that you have a very bizarre way of seeing things.

100 students. 60 chics and 40 dudes.

15 of those chics are enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and math. The other 45 are distributed similarly throughout the other college programs: 15 in education, 15 in the arts, and 15 in finance. That's pretty evenly distributed.


I am starting to suspect a bit of trolling here or  some abuse of percentages.

to carry your example out further, then there would be 10 dudes in STEM, 10 in education, 10 in arts and 10 in finance.

so now in the STEM major you have 25 students total, 15 of which are female and 10 are male.  so females make up for 60% of the STEM majors and males make up for 40% of STEM majors.  That would be the ideal since it matches the total general population, but currently STEM classes are at 5 female students out of 25 (20%) and 20 male students out of 25 for 80% of the majors.  5 compared to 20 is not well distributed when it should be 15 to 10.  So, what is it about STEM majors that causes females to under represent?
 
2013-12-28 11:15:59 PM  
Ok, well I appreciate your not getting pissed for me asking. It's just that you have a very bizarre way of seeing things.

100 students. 60 chics and 40 dudes.

15 of those chics are enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and math. The other 45 are distributed similarly throughout the other college programs: 15 in education, 15 in the arts, and 15 in finance. That's pretty evenly distributed.

I am starting to suspect a bit of trolling here or  some abuse of percentages.

to carry your example out further, then there would be 10 dudes in STEM, 10 in education, 10 in arts and 10 in finance.

so now in the STEM major you have 25 students total, 15 of which are female and 10 are male.  so females make up for 60% of the STEM majors and males make up for 40% of STEM majors.  That would be the ideal since it matches the total general population, but currently STEM classes are at 5 female students out of 25 (20%) and 20 male students out of 25 for 80% of the majors.  5 compared to 20 is not well distributed when it should be 15 to 10.  So, what is it about STEM majors that causes females to under represent?


No, I'm not trolling. And your math carries out proving mine wrong.

I just see females as perfectly capable of doing the hard sciences, but choosing to do something else. I suppose it's worth examining, but I'm always really suspicious of social engineering.
 
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