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(National Post)   The ten Canadian phrases that confuse our American counterparts include words like toque, mickey and single-payer health care   (news.nationalpost.com) divider line 142
    More: Interesting, Canadians, Americans, mickey, Rob Ford, anglosphere, Justin Trudeau, date rape drug, phrases  
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10541 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Dec 2013 at 4:29 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-26 11:40:01 PM
Homo Milk

This giggle-inducing dairy product (milk with 3.25% fat) is exclusively called "whole milk"


I'm assuming that's a shortening of "homogenized", but isn't all milk homogenized?
 
2013-12-26 11:43:17 PM

fusillade762: Homo Milk

This giggle-inducing dairy product (milk with 3.25% fat) is exclusively called "whole milk"

I'm assuming that's a shortening of "homogenized", but isn't all milk homogenized?


Perhaps you're unaware of the no homo milk.
 
2013-12-26 11:48:51 PM
Hey Canada, go look up toque in a farking dictionary, and then apologize to yourselves and to us for using that word wrong.
 
2013-12-27 12:06:37 AM
I knew them all except the screwdriver. Then again I lived about 12 feet from Canada while I was a kid.
 
2013-12-27 12:11:39 AM

HotWingAgenda: Hey Canada, go look up toque in a farking dictionary, and then apologize to yourselves and to us for using that word wrong.


What I loved was the pronunciation. I get that it's a bilingual country, but there's no "u" or double-o to make it "too-que".

FTA:  Donair

Dammit. And I've been telling people it's the Canadian spelling for doner.

/fricking donairs near the University of Alberta were so farking delicious. I have to get the recipe for that sauce!
//Difficulty: It's not tzaziki. I think it's garlic and sweetened condensed milk or something. . .

Also, I'm finding not many Americans seem to know what a block heater is??? Though that may only because I mostly know people in climates where you would never need one.
 
2013-12-27 12:15:45 AM
I only knew the screwdriver, but homo milk was an easy guess. And I didn't know a Mickey was a 375 ml bottle, OR a date rape drink. The only Mickeys I know are the mouse, the baseball player, and the malt liquor.
 
2013-12-27 12:35:44 AM

fusillade762: Homo Milk

This giggle-inducing dairy product (milk with 3.25% fat) is exclusively called "whole milk"

I'm assuming that's a shortening of "homogenized", but isn't all milk homogenized?


Yes, it is short for homogenized.

Still don't know why Robertsons aren't more commonly used outside Canada.  They're better than Phillips or standard.
 
2013-12-27 12:43:31 AM

fusillade762: Homo Milk

This giggle-inducing dairy product (milk with 3.25% fat) is exclusively called "whole milk"

I'm assuming that's a shortening of "homogenized", but isn't all milk homogenized?


You're correct on both counts.  There was a time not that long ago (at least on the Canadian prairies) when it was more common to do so only with the higher fat content milk products, though.

Peki: HotWingAgenda: Hey Canada, go look up toque in a farking dictionary, and then apologize to yourselves and to us for using that word wrong.

Well, we've been using it wrong for generations.  So for Canadian purposes, usage is 100% correct (and ubiquitous).  Besides, it's fun to say.  Beats the hell out of 'knitted cap'.

Also, I'm finding not many Americans seem to know what a block heater is??? Though that may only because I mostly know people in climates where you would never need one.

Again, there's two usages here.  The one you're referring to (plug in device to keep an engine from freezing overnight in extreme cold).  It's also commonly used slang on the prairies for a toque.

TFA mentions bunny hugs as being common to the prairies.  I've never heard it outside of Saskatchewan.  And if you want to get into Saskatchewan colloquialisms, you'd also need to add Vico and gitch and gotch (boys underwear, tighty whities fall into this category).  These words are ginch and gonch in Alberta.  The changeover happens somewhere east of Hanna, but I haven't done linguistic analysis that's any more precise than that.

I know and use 100% of these terms, and I'm a native Albertan.  It's safe to say the list has a western bent.

Other words/terms of note should probably include Caesar (bloody mary with Clamato, invented in Calgary) and Giv'r (analogous to 'git er done' used in the southern US).  If you want to hear 'Albertois' used properly a good cultural reference would be FUBAR.  It's a comedy that's frighteningly close to a documentary of my young adulthood growing up in rural Alberta.  Highly recommended.
 
2013-12-27 12:48:34 AM

unyon: I know and use 100% of these terms, and I'm a native Albertan.  It's safe to say the list has a western bent.


Ah, that's probably why I recognized a lot of them. I spent 3 years at uni in Edmonton.

Also, for your (and everyone else's enjoyment):  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMxGVfk09lU

/from what I recall, that one has a slightly more eastern bent
 
2013-12-27 12:52:22 AM

I_Am_Weasel: Still don't know why Robertsons aren't more commonly used outside Canada.  They're better than Phillips or standard.


Absolutely.  But essentially, Robertson was a better inventor than a marketer.  Like Tesla and Edison, Robertson's product got out marketed by Henry Phillips and the inferior Phillips head screw.  The Henry Ford episode on Canadian-made cars sealed the deal.  There's a good history of the product here.
 
2013-12-27 01:32:48 AM
I'm pretty sure most people could figure out most of those in context.  I'd bet a bag of homo milk on it.
 
2013-12-27 01:38:03 AM
I had Freezies growing up.  They were awesome.

/American
 
2013-12-27 01:42:57 AM

unyon: I_Am_Weasel: Still don't know why Robertsons aren't more commonly used outside Canada.  They're better than Phillips or standard.

Absolutely.  But essentially, Robertson was a better inventor than a marketer.  Like Tesla and Edison, Robertson's product got out marketed by Henry Phillips and the inferior Phillips head screw.  The Henry Ford episode on Canadian-made cars sealed the deal.  There's a good history of the product here.


We don't call them Robertsons but I've used quite a lot of square-bit screws and they can be nearly as frustrating as phillips. Switching from a regular drill to a good impact driver has made a huge difference in my screw shooting. We have one that is marketed to me as a "dual-bit" (but it probably has a real name), it has a square in the center and phillips cuts outside that, so it can be driven by either, or the "dual-bit". It's pretty fantastic and I like the versatility.
 
2013-12-27 01:43:40 AM
Every country has its own idioms.

For instance, I could slap on some jandals, fill up the chilly bin and head out with some jokers to a bach in the wop-wops. My mates are some hard cases, and one is a bit of a dag, but she'll be right. It'll all be sweet as. We should remember some tucker too - bring a plate.
 
2013-12-27 01:47:49 AM

violentsalvation: I only knew the screwdriver, but homo milk was an easy guess. And I didn't know a Mickey was a 375 ml bottle, OR a date rape drink. The only Mickeys I know are the mouse, the baseball player, and the malt liquor.


Are you saying that you've never heard of someone who was "slipped a mickey"? I've heard this term to indicate a knock you out and have you wake up somewhere else (like a date rape drug) for most of my life. I'm pretty sure I've seen it used as an explanation for why guys drinking in port wake up and find themselves shanghaied. I didn't know that it was also a term Canadians used for 375 ml bottles
 
2013-12-27 01:51:11 AM

Philbb: violentsalvation: I only knew the screwdriver, but homo milk was an easy guess. And I didn't know a Mickey was a 375 ml bottle, OR a date rape drink. The only Mickeys I know are the mouse, the baseball player, and the malt liquor.

Are you saying that you've never heard of someone who was "slipped a mickey"? I've heard this term to indicate a knock you out and have you wake up somewhere else (like a date rape drug) for most of my life. I'm pretty sure I've seen it used as an explanation for why guys drinking in port wake up and find themselves shanghaied. I didn't know that it was also a term Canadians used for 375 ml bottles


I've always only heard it called a roofie.
 
2013-12-27 01:51:48 AM

Peki: Also, I'm finding not many Americans seem to know what a block heater is??? Though that may only because I mostly know people in climates where you would never need one.


Became quite familiar with them during my time in Alaska.  :)  But yeah, anywhere south of that... not so much.
 
2013-12-27 02:02:11 AM
"Slipped a mickey" is an old school phrase, it was named after Mickey Finn who liked to dose his customers. He was about robbing not raping.

"Roofies" became the term after Rohypnol hit the streets and Date rape became a thing.
 
2013-12-27 02:34:08 AM

violentsalvation: Philbb: violentsalvation: I only knew the screwdriver, but homo milk was an easy guess. And I didn't know a Mickey was a 375 ml bottle, OR a date rape drink. The only Mickeys I know are the mouse, the baseball player, and the malt liquor.

Are you saying that you've never heard of someone who was "slipped a mickey"? I've heard this term to indicate a knock you out and have you wake up somewhere else (like a date rape drug) for most of my life. I'm pretty sure I've seen it used as an explanation for why guys drinking in port wake up and find themselves shanghaied. I didn't know that it was also a term Canadians used for 375 ml bottles

I've always only heard it called a roofie.


As DaCricket said:

DaCricket: "Slipped a mickey" is an old school phrase, it was named after Mickey Finn who liked to dose his customers. He was about robbing not raping.

"Roofies" became the term after Rohypnol hit the streets and Date rape became a thing.


Except that date rape was already a thing, these new roofies ( as well as similar drugs) just made it easier and less likely to be successfully prosecuted. i.e. "you say that you were there drinking and partying with your friends and the next thing you know is that you're naked in a side room with vague memories of this guy on top of you but you can't be sure?"
 
2013-12-27 02:45:17 AM

thisispete: Every country has its own idioms.

For instance, I could slap on some jandals, fill up the chilly bin and head out with some jokers to a bach in the wop-wops. My mates are some hard cases, and one is a bit of a dag, but she'll be right. It'll all be sweet as. We should remember some tucker too - bring a plate.


Fair dinkum.

Do Kiwis use that one?
 
2013-12-27 02:51:02 AM

fusillade762: Fair dinkum.

Do Kiwis use that one?


I think that's purely one from across the ditch. We do share a lot with the Aussies, though.
 
2013-12-27 03:14:20 AM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-12-27 03:21:33 AM
More importantly, why are they spelling "tuque" with an o?
 
2013-12-27 04:44:51 AM
Donair

I live in the south and whenever I tell people about this tasty tasty they look at me like I'm from another planet.

Beats a gyro any damn day!
 
2013-12-27 04:55:12 AM
Here's one that we use in America:
5.media.bustedtees.cvcdn.com
 
2013-12-27 05:00:12 AM
List completely fails without "two-four", "Joe louis", "butter tart", and "eavestroughing" to name a few.
 
2013-12-27 05:00:49 AM
I like going to American restaurants and asking them for a serviette.

They don't know what it means! It makes me feel so superior.
 
2013-12-27 05:01:18 AM

HotWingAgenda: Hey Canada, go look up toque in a farking dictionary, and then apologize to yourselves and to us for using that word wrong.


Hey America, your dictionary is full of intentional spelling mistakes, fix them then apologise to the rest of the world for using the wrong spelling.
 
2013-12-27 05:01:57 AM

Philbb: violentsalvation: I only knew the screwdriver, but homo milk was an easy guess. And I didn't know a Mickey was a 375 ml bottle, OR a date rape drink. The only Mickeys I know are the mouse, the baseball player, and the malt liquor.

Are you saying that you've never heard of someone who was "slipped a mickey"? I've heard this term to indicate a knock you out and have you wake up somewhere else (like a date rape drug) for most of my life. I'm pretty sure I've seen it used as an explanation for why guys drinking in port wake up and find themselves shanghaied. I didn't know that it was also a term Canadians used for 375 ml bottles


I've heard it, but not from Americans. I've said it before and gotten blank stares from people who don't consume much British media.
 
2013-12-27 05:02:04 AM
I've got news for my American friends, and for The National Post:

I've lived in Canada my whole life and I hadn't heard of donair or parkade.

I also don't say aboot, and rarely (if ever) say eh.

But I also must confess, that I wasn't aware that Americans didn't use the term pencil crayons or homo milk. Interesting. So I guess I really am a true Canadian, afterall.
 
2013-12-27 05:08:38 AM
Oh, also, I had never heard the term hooped, used by western Canadians. But they are weird, and shouldn't technically count as being in the same country anyway.
 
2013-12-27 05:08:51 AM
Technologically superior to its wedge or Phillips-head cousins, the Robertson screw, invented by Ontarian P.L. Robertson, is ubiquitous on Canadian construction sites, yet only constitutes a fraction of all U.S. screw sales-purportedly because the screw was long-ago eschewed by carmaker Henry Ford.

This is a factoid. It's actually because mechanized industrial drills can't use the Robertson because of the risks of over-tightening and cracking the casing.
 
2013-12-27 05:33:32 AM
Them not "knowing" what single-payer health care automatically makes them smarter than any Canadian.
 
2013-12-27 05:36:08 AM

unyon: loody mary with Clamato, invented in Calgary)


A lot of Mexicans I know would probably like a word with you about that.
 
2013-12-27 05:51:54 AM

Mmmrky: I had Freezies growing up.  They were awesome.

/American


They sell them all around Chicagoimg.fark.net
 
2013-12-27 05:59:48 AM

desolation15: Donair

I live in the south and whenever I tell people about this tasty tasty they look at me like I'm from another planet.

Beats a gyro any damn day!


Looks like it's made with ground beef, not lamb?

Neat.
 
2013-12-27 06:01:03 AM

Rhino_man: Here's one that we use in America:
[5.media.bustedtees.cvcdn.com image 800x523]


profile.ak.fbcdn.net
All depends on your point of view. The one thing the list missed is the KD/Mac and cheese difference up here.

danielscissorhands: I've got news for my American friends, and for The National Post:

I've lived in Canada my whole life and I hadn't heard of donair or parkade.

I also don't say aboot, and rarely (if ever) say eh.

But I also must confess, that I wasn't aware that Americans didn't use the term pencil crayons or homo milk. Interesting. So I guess I really am a true Canadian, afterall.


I do say aboot but it's more like "abowwt" and I do say eh. I wonder if it is an Eastern Ontario thing or more of heavily influenced by Bob and Doug in the formative years. I do know donairs but had never heard of them until I was about 16 but that could be blamed on spending 11-16 in California. Also there is a difference between Halifax donairs and other places. Have heard the term parkade but never used it, and have used the term hooped but very rarely.
 
2013-12-27 06:01:18 AM

drjekel_mrhyde: Mmmrky: I had Freezies growing up.  They were awesome.

/American

They sell them all around Chicago[img.fark.net image 600x183]


2.bp.blogspot.com
That's what we call 'em 'round hyuh.

Or, rather, in NC where I grew up.  I dunno if it's the same 'round hyuh.
 
2013-12-27 06:02:34 AM
junkdrawer67.files.wordpress.com
it's milk
 
2013-12-27 06:03:03 AM

rikkards: Rhino_man: Here's one that we use in America:
[5.media.bustedtees.cvcdn.com image 800x523]

[profile.ak.fbcdn.net image 131x200]
All depends on your point of view. The one thing the list missed is the KD/Mac and cheese difference up here.

danielscissorhands: I've got news for my American friends, and for The National Post:

I've lived in Canada my whole life and I hadn't heard of donair or parkade.

I also don't say aboot, and rarely (if ever) say eh.

But I also must confess, that I wasn't aware that Americans didn't use the term pencil crayons or homo milk. Interesting. So I guess I really am a true Canadian, afterall.

I do say aboot but it's more like "abowwt" and I do say eh. I wonder if it is an Eastern Ontario thing or more of heavily influenced by Bob and Doug in the formative years. I do know donairs but had never heard of them until I was about 16 but that could be blamed on spending 11-16 in California. Also there is a difference between Halifax donairs and other places. Have heard the term parkade but never used it, and have used the term hooped but very rarely.


The underwear has your balls and it protects your ass, so... yeah, OK.  I can work with that.

Seriously though, I farking love Canada.  People look at me crazy when I say I'm craving french fries and gravy.
 
2013-12-27 06:11:19 AM
Holy fahk, bud!  Only one I didn't know was Hooped but I guess that means she might be dickered, bud.  Friggin' rights.

Oh yeah, and here's a song that's pretty much universally Canadian:

http://youtu.be/F-glHAzXi_M
 
2013-12-27 06:13:09 AM
Rhino_man:

The underwear has your balls and it protects your ass, so... yeah, OK.  I can work with that.

Seriously though, I farking love Canada.  People look at me crazy when I say I'm craving french fries and gravy.


It's all good we keep your head warm and keep the snow off (plus hide the receding hair line :)

You get the same reaction if you want mayo for your fries.
 
2013-12-27 06:45:31 AM
imageshack.us
 
2013-12-27 07:03:02 AM

twat_waffle: I've heard [mickey], but not from Americans. I've said it before and gotten blank stares from people who don't consume much British media.


??

It's named for a Chicago bartender, Mickey Finn, and the word is common in the US.
 
2013-12-27 07:16:40 AM
I don't see how a chefs hat would keep you very warm in Canada .
 
2013-12-27 07:17:01 AM

Norfolking Chance: HotWingAgenda: Hey Canada, go look up toque in a farking dictionary, and then apologize to yourselves and to us for using that word wrong.

Hey America, your dictionary is full of intentional spelling mistakes, fix them then apologise to the rest of the world for using the wrong spelling.


Yes, and watch those off colour comments as well.

/Surprised we made it this far with poutine?
// Also, is it true Canadian girls use hockey pucks because they last three periods?
 
2013-12-27 07:25:29 AM

I_Am_Weasel: fusillade762: Homo Milk

This giggle-inducing dairy product (milk with 3.25% fat) is exclusively called "whole milk"

I'm assuming that's a shortening of "homogenized", but isn't all milk homogenized?

Yes, it is short for homogenized.

Still don't know why Robertsons aren't more commonly used outside Canada.  They're better than Phillips or standard.


That's like saying a wing nut is "better" than a hex nut.  It depends on the application.  A properly selected Phillips screw is designed to force the driver head out when it reaches a certain torque.  With a Robertson you can tighten the screw until you split the wood or strip the screws.  It would take a real idiot to design something that had, say, a brass Robertson screw going into a steel case.

Standards are brilliant for when you don't want to dick around looking for the proper sized driver to remove a screw on something you have to disassemble all the time.

I sure have met a lot of Canadians who seem inordinately proud of their square headed screws though.  If Canadians are so excited about one little Canadian invention, I guess Americans must be in a constant state of euphoria.
 
2013-12-27 07:33:10 AM

Ishkur: I like going to American restaurants and asking them for a serviette.

They don't know what it means! It makes me feel so superior.


Approves:

hypetrak.com
 
2013-12-27 07:55:21 AM
I worked with several Brits and Canadians in the same office in the Midwest and they could barely understand each other because they came from different parts of their respective countries. Even our programmers from India kept reminding them to "just speak English" and when they did there were no communication barriers. Everyone found it comical that, of all people, the Americans and Indians were the ones correcting the others on English pronunciations. It was like a daily, constant game of Scrabble with how often we were challenged to look up in the dictionary how certain words should be pronounced.
 
2013-12-27 08:01:48 AM
Best way to start the morning: a goofy argument of Canadian vs. American English with the husband. Pronunciation and slang are both fun fights. (Yes, this is a common argument, this list just gave us more to fight and giggle over.)
 
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