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(RealClear)   Edward Snowden says his "mission is accomplished" and that he has "already won." Because being branded a traitor, a spy, and a terrorist by your home country and being forced to live in Russia is a great victory   (realclear.com) divider line 149
    More: Dumbass, Russia, Barton Gellman, missions  
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1103 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Dec 2013 at 10:11 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-24 10:36:41 AM
Sure he can never come home, but Moscow is a pretty damn nice city to live in if you have access to money.
 
2013-12-24 10:37:20 AM

ChipNASA: [images.dailykos.com image 440x287]

/can't believe I'm the first.


A date that will live in infamy.
 
2013-12-24 10:38:02 AM

NSA:  Nothing Sacred Anymore

 
2013-12-24 10:38:54 AM

Weatherkiss: Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Yeah, his great reveal to the world at just how intricate and in-depth the NSA's spying programs are has really shaken up the American people and outraged them to the point where they're forcing the government's hand to do away with them spying on citizens in their own country and abroad. Clearly, Snowden (and Julian Assange) have permanently altered the course of national and foreign policy on espionage as the majority of America is outraged enough to do something about it.

... wait, what? You mean the American people have decided they might be annoyed, but not outraged enough to do something about it? What? You mean they keep electing the same people who signed this being legal into the same office every election year? You mean their outrage consists of complaining on internet forums and on media outlets without any desire to change the way things are done?

What a victory, Edward Snowden. You showed the world what America was doing, how wrong it was, and outside of hollow insults and saber rattling... the world shrugged their shoulders and said they didn't care.

You expect things to change all at once, huh?

I was kind of expecting a French Revolution type deal, yes. I can compromise though. If there's any proof that things are changing for the better in terms of what he revealed, I'll gladly read it and eat my words.


The French Revolution didnt just happen because one day people got pissed off.

Nothing has changed yet, no.  Someday we may look back and look and pin point this as a significant moment in the change you are talking about.  Here is hoping.
 
2013-12-24 10:39:19 AM

Shadowknight: Yes, he betrayed an oath to his country. But I have a hard time being mad at him, because he did it for what he (presumably) thought was a good cause. He (presumably) believed his country committed a grave wrong, and revealed it to the world.


Not sure.

This country is founded on the ideal that sometimes your government is bad and needs to be spanked, and promising them that you'll work in their best interests and then being told to run the North American KGB is your government betraying your trust in them more than anything else.

Part of the attack of the Government on the people is to shift the core ideals of our society from Patriotism as loyalty to your country as a people to Patriotism as loyalty to your country as the State.  One of the core founding ideals was that the government acts as a public servant:  it is commissioned by the people, of the people, for the people.  What we now call "leaders" used to be what was called "public servants".

It might sound extreme, but the fact of the matter is we should have started ejecting people from office the moment they tried to tell us they had some sort of authority over us.  The government has no authority over me; the government executes the authority of the whole of our society against me.  It is the tool of the people, and those in power are there to serve our will.  The moment they started claiming to be there to "lead", we should have ripped them from their chairs and firmly planted someone else to do their job.
 
2013-12-24 10:39:34 AM

silly season: If Snowden was to come back to the USA, would he be tried by the secret court, military court or a jury trial?

/If it was jury trial, I already know which way I would vote.


from popehat
We've discussed the whole "high court/low court" concept here a few times before - in that those who are powerful play by one set of rules, while the rest of us have to play by a very different set of rules.
...
The end result seems clear. If you're super high up in the political chain, you get the high court. Reveal classified info to filmmakers? No worries. Not only will you not be prosecuted or even lose your job, the inspectors will scrub your name from the report and, according to the article, the person in charge of the investigation will "slow roll" the eventual release of the report until you switch jobs.
But if you're just a worker bee and you leaked the unclassified draft report that names Panetta and Vickers? Well, you get the low court. A new investigation, including aggressive pursuit by the government, and interrogations of staffers to try to find out who leaked the report.


so he would get the low court
 
2013-12-24 10:39:55 AM

Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Yeah, his great reveal to the world at just how intricate and in-depth the NSA's spying programs are has really shaken up the American people and outraged them to the point where they're forcing the government's hand to do away with them spying on citizens in their own country and abroad. Clearly, Snowden (and Julian Assange) have permanently altered the course of national and foreign policy on espionage as the majority of America is outraged enough to do something about it.

... wait, what? You mean the American people have decided they might be annoyed, but not outraged enough to do something about it? What? You mean they keep electing the same people who signed this being legal into the same office every election year? You mean their outrage consists of complaining on internet forums and on media outlets without any desire to change the way things are done?

What a victory, Edward Snowden. You showed the world what America was doing, how wrong it was, and outside of hollow insults and saber rattling... the world shrugged their shoulders and said they didn't care.

You expect things to change all at once, huh?

I was kind of expecting a French Revolution type deal, yes. I can compromise though. If there's any proof that things are changing for the better in terms of what he revealed, I'll gladly read it and eat my words.

The French Revolution didnt just happen because one day people got pissed off.

Nothing has changed yet, no.  Someday we may look back and look and pin point this as a significant moment in the change you are talking about.  Here is hoping.


Can you have a Revolution w/o going all French?
 
2013-12-24 10:40:14 AM

Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Yeah, his great reveal to the world at just how intricate and in-depth the NSA's spying programs are has really shaken up the American people and outraged them to the point where they're forcing the government's hand to do away with them spying on citizens in their own country and abroad. Clearly, Snowden (and Julian Assange) have permanently altered the course of national and foreign policy on espionage as the majority of America is outraged enough to do something about it.

... wait, what? You mean the American people have decided they might be annoyed, but not outraged enough to do something about it? What? You mean they keep electing the same people who signed this being legal into the same office every election year? You mean their outrage consists of complaining on internet forums and on media outlets without any desire to change the way things are done?

What a victory, Edward Snowden. You showed the world what America was doing, how wrong it was, and outside of hollow insults and saber rattling... the world shrugged their shoulders and said they didn't care.

You expect things to change all at once, huh?

I was kind of expecting a French Revolution type deal, yes. I can compromise though. If there's any proof that things are changing for the better in terms of what he revealed, I'll gladly read it and eat my words.

The French Revolution didnt just happen because one day people got pissed off.

Nothing has changed yet, no.  Someday we may look back and look and pin point this as a significant moment in the change you are talking about.  Here is hoping.


I'm also hoping. But at the same time I'm under the impression that despite all the internet rage and media talking points (on both sides of the political spectrum), noone cares enough to do anything about it.
 
2013-12-24 10:41:23 AM

snocone: Can you have a Revolution w/o going all French?


I think it has been done.  Personally, I want the show so let's all lose our collective farking minds.
 
2013-12-24 10:42:50 AM

bluefoxicy: Shadowknight: Yes, he betrayed an oath to his country. But I have a hard time being mad at him, because he did it for what he (presumably) thought was a good cause. He (presumably) believed his country committed a grave wrong, and revealed it to the world.

Not sure.

This country is founded on the ideal that sometimes your government is bad and needs to be spanked, and promising them that you'll work in their best interests and then being told to run the North American KGB is your government betraying your trust in them more than anything else.

Part of the attack of the Government on the people is to shift the core ideals of our society from Patriotism as loyalty to your country as a people to Patriotism as loyalty to your country as the State.  One of the core founding ideals was that the government acts as a public servant:  it is commissioned by the people, of the people, for the people.  What we now call "leaders" used to be what was called "public servants".

It might sound extreme, but the fact of the matter is we should have started ejecting people from office the moment they tried to tell us they had some sort of authority over us.  The government has no authority over me; the government executes the authority of the whole of our society against me.  It is the tool of the people, and those in power are there to serve our will.  The moment they started claiming to be there to "lead", we should have ripped them from their chairs and firmly planted someone else to do their job.


There it is.

Just like first grade drinking fountain line. When the bully first steps up, whack whack whack.
Give an inch, lose it all.
 
2013-12-24 10:44:03 AM

Weatherkiss: I'm also hoping. But at the same time I'm under the impression that despite all the internet rage and media talking points (on both sides of the political spectrum), noone cares enough to do anything about it.


Seems to be the case.  Hard to predict when people snap.  The intelligence community is firmly intrenched and has a lot of power of persuasion.  I am not sure how the citizenry goes about effecting such a change.  This one may take time to figure out and the more people who pull back the curtain the better.  I understand why people love/hate Snowden.  What I can not understand is people who try to act like he is insignificant.
 
2013-12-24 10:44:32 AM

Gunny Highway: snocone: Can you have a Revolution w/o going all French?

I think it has been done.  Personally, I want the show so let's all lose our collective farking minds.


THIS is what "reality TV" was made for.
Public hangings. Only legal ones, mods.
No illegal activity promotion here.
 
2013-12-24 10:46:32 AM
How is this Snowden/NSA thing even a story?

I personally assumed the rapid digitizing of our lives via the internet, cell phones, auto black boxes, IPASS units, credit card records, speed cameras, and the rest, allowed spying on all of us and our worldwide friends.

All you who were surprised when Snowden shot off his mouth just sound naive.
 
2013-12-24 10:46:58 AM

snocone: Give an inch, lose it all.


Maybe we should have women run the country.  Give a man an inch, he wants a mile.  Give a woman an inch, she only wants eight.
 
2013-12-24 10:47:22 AM

Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: I'm also hoping. But at the same time I'm under the impression that despite all the internet rage and media talking points (on both sides of the political spectrum), noone cares enough to do anything about it.

Seems to be the case.  Hard to predict when people snap.  The intelligence community is firmly intrenched and has a lot of power of persuasion.  I am not sure how the citizenry goes about effecting such a change.  This one may take time to figure out and the more people who pull back the curtain the better.  I understand why people love/hate Snowden.  What I can not understand is people who try to act like he is insignificant.


I think history will show whether or not he is insignifigant. But as of this present moment I'm on the firm opinion that he is. Like all the other whistleblowers on the government, this fizzled because the American people simply don't care.
 
2013-12-24 10:47:47 AM
Wow, people are actually defending the NSA after more or less admitting to exceeding their mandate?


//People are dumb
 
2013-12-24 10:48:15 AM
Right or wrong, he's an insufferable douche.
 
2013-12-24 10:49:57 AM

Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: I'm also hoping. But at the same time I'm under the impression that despite all the internet rage and media talking points (on both sides of the political spectrum), noone cares enough to do anything about it.

Seems to be the case.  Hard to predict when people snap.  The intelligence community is firmly intrenched and has a lot of power of persuasion.  I am not sure how the citizenry goes about effecting such a change.  This one may take time to figure out and the more people who pull back the curtain the better.  I understand why people love/hate Snowden.  What I can not understand is people who try to act like he is insignificant.


One day, I'll become president.

Then I'll declare myself emperor in the 7th year of my second term.  It worked for Napoleon.

Maybe after a couple decades, Americans will figure it out.  If not, I'll have to start picking out peoples' hot wives and work on a successor.  Eventually they've got to break.
 
2013-12-24 10:50:00 AM
Here's a good point that I haven't seen mentioned even once.  If the NSA is so gaddam awesome at spying, how did this dude manage to get away with all that information, stowe is money offshore, and leave the country unnoticed, until he was ready to reveal what he knew?

By his account, the NSA should have been completely aware that his meneuvering was occuring.  But they were taken completely by surprise.  Even if he was covering his tracks, the NSA should have noticed that someone was covering their tracks.  If not, it seems to me that the NSA is actually a quite incompetent spying network.  They can't even keep their own people in check.  Even people who are contractors with elevated security clearance.  People who should be monitored with more scrutiny.

On some level, that has to amount to some bullshiat.
 
2013-12-24 10:50:51 AM
Give it arrest already.
 
2013-12-24 10:51:03 AM

Epic Fap Session: Right or wrong, he's an insufferable douche.


And?
 
2013-12-24 10:52:06 AM

Shadowknight: But long term, we may be better off because we get more transparency in our government.


I'm willing to bet that isn't how it plays out.

Government doesn't reform or behave when caught with its hand in the cookie jar. It doubles down on the secrecy and abuse because upping the ante and not-getting-caught is always the better policy.
Its why we find ourselves at such an extreme now, and there won't be a change until someone in leadership takes a literal torch to the place.

Whatever Snowden unveils you can rest assured that the truth is far worse and the NSA's top priority is to eliminate as much transparency as possible.

/But hey, at least one branch of government still listens to us.
 
2013-12-24 10:52:48 AM

durbnpoisn: Here's a good point that I haven't seen mentioned even once.  If the NSA is so gaddam awesome at spying, how did this dude manage to get away with all that information, stowe is money offshore, and leave the country unnoticed, until he was ready to reveal what he knew?

By his account, the NSA should have been completely aware that his meneuvering was occuring.  But they were taken completely by surprise.  Even if he was covering his tracks, the NSA should have noticed that someone was covering their tracks.  If not, it seems to me that the NSA is actually a quite incompetent spying network.  They can't even keep their own people in check.  Even people who are contractors with elevated security clearance.  People who should be monitored with more scrutiny.

On some level, that has to amount to some bullshiat.


They collect everything just in case (from what I have heard).  They may need to reevaluate what they are doing.
 
2013-12-24 10:56:56 AM

Epic Fap Session: Right or wrong, he's an insufferable douche.


you personally met the guy?
 
2013-12-24 11:00:16 AM

durbnpoisn: Here's a good point that I haven't seen mentioned even once.  If the NSA is so gaddam awesome at spying, how did this dude manage to get away with all that information, stowe is money offshore, and leave the country unnoticed, until he was ready to reveal what he knew?

By his account, the NSA should have been completely aware that his meneuvering was occuring.  But they were taken completely by surprise.  Even if he was covering his tracks, the NSA should have noticed that someone was covering their tracks.  If not, it seems to me that the NSA is actually a quite incompetent spying network.  They can't even keep their own people in check.  Even people who are contractors with elevated security clearance.  People who should be monitored with more scrutiny.

On some level, that has to amount to some bullshiat.


It's relatively easy to hide intentionally.  For some reason or another, I'm practically invisible--people can't track me without loads of effort due to my social behavioral patterns.  They'd have to have taps on everything I do, GPS and cameras in my car, in my house, at work, in my phone.  That's just a consequence of being me, for reasons I can't understand:  you can't passively gather data on me and get anything useful.  The NSA missed absolutely everything about me in a medium-scale concentrated investigation that involved 7 contracted investigators in 3 states along the east coast talking to everyone I've ever known and investigating every company I've ever worked for, pulling all electronic records... they didn't know I'd gotten away with a hit-and-run, didn't know any of my social contacts, couldn't piece together 90% of my life (they got exactly what I told them), they didn't even find out that I was running an illegal gambling racket and defrauding the government for a few thousand dollars per year while using a front business to cover it and launder my unreported proceeds.

If they were trying any harder, they'd need a dozen private investigators following me around everywhere, casing ... I spent most of my life at home, so casing "the places I hang out at" would be useless ... and so on.  Anything short of that is easily evadable by intent.

You'd be surprised at how hard it is to actually gather intelligence about someone.  It's not like a cartoon where the black coats turn on a TV and it's got your face on it 24/7.  Retroactive spying is ridiculously useless; active spying involves a lot of resources and is very hard to keep up for an extended period undetected.  In the case of espionage, spies are usually well-known and fed false information (Bruce Schneier had a field day going over the problems this causes--the end result is that espionage is a waste of time and resources, because you can't really trust any intelligence you get from it).

I'm unsurprised Snowden pulled it off.  A retarded Russian woman could pull it off--OH WAIT.
 
2013-12-24 11:01:00 AM

Edward 'Snowed-In'



/ The Universe has quite the sense of humor
// A licky boom-boom down
 
2013-12-24 11:01:45 AM
img.photobucket.com

LULZ were accomplished, subtard.
 
2013-12-24 11:01:46 AM
Anybody remember the Church Committee?  Yeah, antediluvian:  Millions of telegrams seined, the executives of Western Union? `gee, we didn't know' (ala Google, et al).
Only the technology and means of targeting have changed:   http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/church/reports/book3/pdf/churchb3_1 0 _nsa.pdf

The National Security State can be put on a diet.  Private Data Brokers can drill down with a far greater range of `granularity' - the gov. can just plug their feeding tube into that reservoir if it really wants YOU.  Yes, these are unregulated job creators who will be hiring up those laid-off NSA quants and they'll be looking to further dry gulch us into some correlative inevitability or other owing to vastly improved `slicing and dicing' of the `demographic' - the targeting as precise (even if absolutely wrong) as having a tomahawk jabbed up one's tailpipe.

Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing on just that last week:   http://www.c-spanvideo.org/event/229200

Chairman Rockefeller got a bit testy:

"Since before 9/11 I've been on the Intelligence Committee and. every day, I wake up to seven newspapers with nothing but NSA headlines.  And, I'm here to tell you, as one of the authors of FISA, the Patriot Act and all the rest of it, that the NSA is so secure in its protection of privacy as compared to this group that we are talking to, these data brokers, it's not even close.  This affects, as was pointed out, anybody, everybody.  Who knows?  NSA knows,  They are only likely to interact at a .000001 percent of people that they conclude need further observation.  This is everybody, anybody, but more than that divided into race, economic activities, education, and there's something -  I can't prove it is wrong - but there's something lethal about it..."

/Snowden will warrant a footnote
 
2013-12-24 11:08:19 AM
Hey Subby, what's your NSA badge number?
 
2013-12-24 11:08:35 AM
He gave Redditors and Dudebros across the country epic levels of smug for, yet again, being above the sheeple. What greater victory could one ask for?
 
2013-12-24 11:11:09 AM

bluorangefyre: No, mission NOT accomplished because he needs to tell us if UFOs exist and who really shot JFK.


Obviously UFOs do exist, and they killed JFK.
 
2013-12-24 11:12:28 AM

bluefoxicy: durbnpoisn: Here's a good point that I haven't seen mentioned even once.  If the NSA is so gaddam awesome at spying, how did this dude manage to get away with all that information, stowe is money offshore, and leave the country unnoticed, until he was ready to reveal what he knew?

By his account, the NSA should have been completely aware that his meneuvering was occuring.  But they were taken completely by surprise.  Even if he was covering his tracks, the NSA should have noticed that someone was covering their tracks.  If not, it seems to me that the NSA is actually a quite incompetent spying network.  They can't even keep their own people in check.  Even people who are contractors with elevated security clearance.  People who should be monitored with more scrutiny.

On some level, that has to amount to some bullshiat.

It's relatively easy to hide intentionally.  For some reason or another, I'm practically invisible--people can't track me without loads of effort due to my social behavioral patterns.  They'd have to have taps on everything I do, GPS and cameras in my car, in my house, at work, in my phone.  That's just a consequence of being me, for reasons I can't understand:  you can't passively gather data on me and get anything useful.  The NSA missed absolutely everything about me in a medium-scale concentrated investigation that involved 7 contracted investigators in 3 states along the east coast talking to everyone I've ever known and investigating every company I've ever worked for, pulling all electronic records... they didn't know I'd gotten away with a hit-and-run, didn't know any of my social contacts, couldn't piece together 90% of my life (they got exactly what I told them), they didn't even find out that I was running an illegal gambling racket and defrauding the government for a few thousand dollars per year while using a front business to cover it and launder my unreported proceeds.

If they were trying any harder, they'd need a dozen private inve ...


That was a rather long winded way of saying that "spying is very hard, and doesn't reveal much that is useful".

So, what did Snowden really accomplish then?  If what you're saying is true, he completely wasted his time and effort.
 
2013-12-24 11:12:46 AM

HailRobonia: Obviously UFOs do exist, and they killed JFK.


What if the UFO made JFK kill JFK?

www.virginmedia.com
 
2013-12-24 11:14:09 AM
Now, I'm no doctor...but I suspect the dude wasn't expecting a ticker-tape parade and breakfast at the White House. There was possibly a slight suspicion on his part that what he was about to do miiiiiight not go over so well with his country of origin.

Just thinkin' out loud.
 
2013-12-24 11:15:30 AM

Shadowknight: That said, I know what the guy did was technically wrong. Yes, he betrayed an oath to his country. But I have a hard time being mad at him, because he did it for what he (presumably) thought was a good cause. He (presumably) believed his country committed a grave wrong, and revealed it to the world.


There is no patriotism in "my country right or wrong".  That is blind nationalism.  A true patriot believes their country should do right, even if they have to be shamed and "betrayed" into doing it.  Snowden obviously wasn't afraid of suffering personally to do this, but after what happened to Chelsea Manning (indefinite imprisonment, extended torture and every attempt by the gov't to avoid a fair trial) I don't blame him for fleeing.

Sadly, at this point, nothing could force the USA to "do right" geopolitically.  They will continue to spy, lie, bribe, coerce, murder and war to get what they want, just like most other countries would do if they had access to that tremendous amount of power.
 
2013-12-24 11:15:34 AM
Out of curiosity, who is paying his bills?  I mean, he's got to live somewhere and eat.   Does he even speak Russian?
 
2013-12-24 11:17:42 AM

snocone: Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Yeah, his great reveal to the world at just how intricate and in-depth the NSA's spying programs are has really shaken up the American people and outraged them to the point where they're forcing the government's hand to do away with them spying on citizens in their own country and abroad. Clearly, Snowden (and Julian Assange) have permanently altered the course of national and foreign policy on espionage as the majority of America is outraged enough to do something about it.

... wait, what? You mean the American people have decided they might be annoyed, but not outraged enough to do something about it? What? You mean they keep electing the same people who signed this being legal into the same office every election year? You mean their outrage consists of complaining on internet forums and on media outlets without any desire to change the way things are done?

What a victory, Edward Snowden. You showed the world what America was doing, how wrong it was, and outside of hollow insults and saber rattling... the world shrugged their shoulders and said they didn't care.

You expect things to change all at once, huh?

I was kind of expecting a French Revolution type deal, yes. I can compromise though. If there's any proof that things are changing for the better in terms of what he revealed, I'll gladly read it and eat my words.

The French Revolution didnt just happen because one day people got pissed off.

Nothing has changed yet, no.  Someday we may look back and look and pin point this as a significant moment in the change you are talking about.  Here is hoping.

Can you have a Revolution w/o going all French?


The Revolution will not be televised.
 
2013-12-24 11:19:45 AM

Satanic_Hamster: Out of curiosity, who is paying his bills?  I mean, he's got to live somewhere and eat.   Does he even speak Russian?


He's got plenty of money.  He was working as a gov't contractor for years and shoved his money into offshore accounts.  He doesn't speak Russian, but he says he's learning.

That's what I heard anyway.
 
2013-12-24 11:20:54 AM

durbnpoisn: He's got plenty of money. He was working as a gov't contractor for years and shoved his money into offshore accounts. He doesn't speak Russian, but he says he's learning.

That's what I heard anyway.


I heard claims early on that his money was in US accounts that were frozen.
 
2013-12-24 11:26:14 AM

Marcus Aurelius: vygramul: I've still not had it explained how revealing we tried to hack Medvedev's phone was being patriotic.

I had not heard that revealing phone hacking was patriotic.  Look at the News of the World phone hacking scandal.  No one even remembers who ratted them out.


Lolwut?
 
2013-12-24 11:29:07 AM

XveryYpettyZ: I have no problem with Snowden spending the rest of his life looking over his shoulder.

But I also think he is to some degree a hero.

The rub with being a martyr is the martyrdom bit.  It shouldn't be costless to betray the secrets of your country.  The only way to ensure that people are doing it for good reasons is to make sure they're ground up by the machinery afterward.


This is where I disagree. I have such a sense of revulsion at the idea of "state secrets" despite the recognition that SOME are necessary and that we will never be rid of them, that I feel like the state is entitled only to the ones that don't get expose. The list of state secrets (if there could be one) that are unexposed should take up less than a single page of paper. You call what he did "betraying the secrets of his country." I find that a government who keeps secrets from its own people and which would punish people for telling the truth has hands so dirty already that they do not get to cry "betrayal."

I hope he gets away with it forever and finds some way to have a happy-ever-after.
 
2013-12-24 11:33:59 AM

Satanic_Hamster: durbnpoisn: He's got plenty of money. He was working as a gov't contractor for years and shoved his money into offshore accounts. He doesn't speak Russian, but he says he's learning.

That's what I heard anyway.

I heard claims early on that his money was in US accounts that were frozen.


I can't imagine it's hard for a computer security expert with almost a Master's degree would find it hard to get a job in Moscow. Their tech industry is booming up right now.
 
2013-12-24 11:34:34 AM
Swinging from the gallows pole comes to mind whenever I see his mug. He'll be in jail and forgotten like Private whats his name soon enough
 
2013-12-24 11:44:05 AM
I'm sure he is suffering horribly.
i.imgur.com

/If this is torture, chain me to the farking wall.
 
2013-12-24 11:46:59 AM

starsrift: I can't imagine it's hard for a computer security expert with almost a Master's degree would find it hard to get a job in Moscow. Their tech industry is booming up right now.


Who would hire him, though?  I mean, would you trust him with your computer systems?
 
2013-12-24 11:53:20 AM

Satanic_Hamster: I heard claims early on that his money was in US accounts that were frozen.


If that's true, then he really didn't think it out well. Even I would have thought of transferring my money if I was about to release a shiatstorm on the U.S. government.
 
2013-12-24 11:54:25 AM
www.chootem.com
 
2013-12-24 11:56:55 AM

vygramul: I've still not had it explained how revealing we tried to hack Medvedev's phone was being patriotic.


Well maybe you can get past your misguided patriotism and educate yourself on what the NSA has been up to domestically.

NSA's made 'secret' payments to RSA to aid spy program, report says
 
2013-12-24 11:58:35 AM

cryinoutloud: If that's true, then he really didn't think it out well. Even I would have thought of transferring my money if I was about to release a shiatstorm on the U.S. government.


I think we figured out early on that he didn't think his cunning plan through very well.  Like getting to a friendly country *first*.
 
2013-12-24 12:06:08 PM

Langdon_777: snocone: Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Gunny Highway: Weatherkiss: Yeah, his great reveal to the world at just how intricate and in-depth the NSA's spying programs are has really shaken up the American people and outraged them to the point where they're forcing the government's hand to do away with them spying on citizens in their own country and abroad. Clearly, Snowden (and Julian Assange) have permanently altered the course of national and foreign policy on espionage as the majority of America is outraged enough to do something about it.

... wait, what? You mean the American people have decided they might be annoyed, but not outraged enough to do something about it? What? You mean they keep electing the same people who signed this being legal into the same office every election year? You mean their outrage consists of complaining on internet forums and on media outlets without any desire to change the way things are done?

What a victory, Edward Snowden. You showed the world what America was doing, how wrong it was, and outside of hollow insults and saber rattling... the world shrugged their shoulders and said they didn't care.

You expect things to change all at once, huh?

I was kind of expecting a French Revolution type deal, yes. I can compromise though. If there's any proof that things are changing for the better in terms of what he revealed, I'll gladly read it and eat my words.

The French Revolution didnt just happen because one day people got pissed off.

Nothing has changed yet, no.  Someday we may look back and look and pin point this as a significant moment in the change you are talking about.  Here is hoping.

Can you have a Revolution w/o going all French?

The Revolution will not be televised.


Damn, 'cause that would be some FAT royalties, eh?
Challenge accepted!
Just have to convince Hollywood and Murdoch that we can show a profit offsetting their current contracts.
 
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