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(Space.com)   Awesome time lapse video of the Milky Way from Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii. Bonus: frikkin' TELESCOPES with frikkin' "LASERS" attached to their frikkin' DOMES   (space.com) divider line 41
    More: Cool, time-lapse photography, Mauna Kea, Milky Way, Hawaii, adaptive optics, domes, Subaru Telescope  
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7029 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2013 at 2:41 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-22 02:49:33 PM
Great video that really shows off how is Earth is spinning, not that the "sky is moving"..

What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?
 
2013-12-22 02:49:35 PM
Dancing laser beams at that
 
2013-12-22 02:53:33 PM
Think how many more tax cuts for the super rich we'd be able to afford if Department of Scientific Crap held a garage sale of all those gadgets.  Things have gotten so bad, I've had to cut back on my caviar intake to twice daily.
 
2013-12-22 02:55:32 PM

styckx: Great video that really shows off how is Earth is spinning, not that the "sky is moving"..

What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_guide_star
 
2013-12-22 02:55:52 PM

styckx: What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for? Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_guide_star
 
2013-12-22 02:56:03 PM

styckx: ... What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?


They're used for adaptive optics systems.  Also intimidation.
 
2013-12-22 02:56:57 PM
Shakes tiny fist at icam.
 
2013-12-22 02:58:01 PM

styckx: Great video that really shows off how is Earth is spinning, not that the "sky is moving"..

What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?


Yep, it's lasers. It's part of the adaptive optics that can subtract out blurring caused by the Earth's atmosphere, I believe. i.e. it makes the image clearer.
 
2013-12-22 03:00:23 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

Get some, Aliens.  We're right here.
 
2013-12-22 03:05:20 PM
Wait ... some of those stars aren't moving ...

Oh  ...

*cleans monitor*

Much better.

Yeah. That really is all kinds of awesome.
 
2013-12-22 03:05:40 PM
Also: There's a great series of videos about astronomy/astronomers/astronomical tools (telescopes).
 
2013-12-22 03:09:06 PM

Glendale: styckx: Great video that really shows off how is Earth is spinning, not that the "sky is moving"..

What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?

Yep, it's lasers. It's part of the adaptive optics that can subtract out blurring caused by the Earth's atmosphere, I believe. i.e. it makes the image clearer.


They do this with the image sensors, too. First procure a dark frame, like with the lens cap on, then a light frame, light pointed at the bright sky, then subtract the dark frame from any final images and divide by the light frame... and then tweak the intensity of the light and dark frames until you get usable images.

This removes random noise from the CCD and also eliminates most of the variation in pixel sensitivity including stuck on/off pixels.
 
2013-12-22 03:11:22 PM

EggSniper: styckx: ... What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?

They're used for adaptive optics systems.  Also intimidation.


LaserCat approves.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-22 03:14:40 PM
That some amaze old'un smart.
 
2013-12-22 03:15:55 PM

Danger Avoid Death: EggSniper: styckx: ... What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?

They're used for adaptive optics systems.  Also intimidation.

LaserCat approves.

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 382x400]


I actually had that shirt from Threadless.
 
2013-12-22 03:23:09 PM

studebaker hoch: [upload.wikimedia.org image 660x599]

Get some, Aliens.  We're right here.


You missed the best one:
farm6.staticflickr.com

BZZZZT!

/resized w/ mspaint
 
2013-12-22 03:27:52 PM

UsikFark: studebaker hoch: [upload.wikimedia.org image 660x599]

Get some, Aliens.  We're right here.

You missed the best one:
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 422x237]

BZZZZT!

/resized w/ mspaint


I think that one should say: Pew, pew, take that Milky Way Galaxy!!
 
2013-12-22 03:41:09 PM
Awesome video.

Any ONE of those individual shots would be wonderful.
 
2013-12-22 03:53:05 PM

styckx: Great video that really shows off how is Earth is spinning, not that the "sky is moving"..

What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?


adaptvie optics
 
2013-12-22 04:36:44 PM
I've had time on 4 of those telescopes but unfortunately it has all been queue time except for one observing run when I sent my post-doc and missed going to Hawaii.  I still have never seen these telescopes in person or even been on the same island with them, and that really hurts as I realize my chances might have slipped away.
 
2013-12-22 04:39:24 PM
Anyone remember that video of the milky way with the camera timed to the movement of earth. (MW stays static but the earth moves in the foreground) Think it was from  south america. Anyone have a link? Can't find it.
 
2013-12-22 04:46:22 PM
super uber cool
 
2013-12-22 05:11:26 PM

styckx: Great video that really shows off how is Earth is spinning, not that the "sky is moving"..

What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?


That would be quite a wait.....  8.6 years for the nearest star, Proxima Centauri.  (4.3 l.y. each way).

The center of the Galaxy is something like 25 000 or more L.Y. away so you'll have time for a beer while waiting for the bounce-back....

/50 years an amateur astronomer
//"Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind- bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space."  Douglas Adams
 
2013-12-22 05:17:38 PM

interstellar_tedium: I've had time on 4 of those telescopes but unfortunately it has all been queue time except for one observing run when I sent my post-doc and missed going to Hawaii.  I still have never seen these telescopes in person or even been on the same island with them, and that really hurts as I realize my chances might have slipped away.



In the late 90s, i took a basic astronomy class at the University of Arizona, under Dr. Chris Impey, and one day he said "time" had unexpectedly opened up that night at the Mt. Lemmon observatory, and we had an exceedingly rar chance to see university-level astronomy on a field trip. I went, and we saw some amazing shiat.

there was a massive telescope and i remember seeing the Moon in astonishing detail, the TAs located some either Jupiter or Saturn's moons, then we turned to various Messier objects. the only one i specifically recall is Stephen's Quintet and I think eitther (perhaps both?) the Ring and/or Ghost Nebula. We looked at a ton of shiat that night, freezing balls, at about 8 or perhaps 9 thousand foot elevation.

/submitter
 
2013-12-22 05:52:03 PM
If I suddenly become wealthy and can retire i think I'd want to spend the rest of my life looking at the sky in Hawaii every night.  amazing images.

From the movie Contact.
Ellie Arroway: I'll tell you one thing about the universe, though. The universe is a pretty big place. It's bigger than anything anyone has ever dreamed of before. So if it's just us... seems like an awful waste of space. Right?

Carl Sagan was always an inspiration to me.
 
2013-12-22 06:25:02 PM
SumFrequency said he helped work on some of those lasers.  Stupid smart people.
 
2013-12-22 06:29:11 PM

Teriaki: SumFrequency said he helped work on some of those lasers.  Stupid smart people.


well shiat. then i think you out-CSB'd my CSB.
 
2013-12-22 06:36:24 PM
Funny thing, Ricky....got an email from Miles. Says you may have used him as a present mule. I'm waiting on my mail.....
 
2013-12-22 08:26:58 PM
They better watch it with those lasers!  Just look how the pilots of airplanes & the FAA get
all pissed off if you point a laser at an aircraft.  Just think of what will happen in a few
thousand years, if some Borg/Deathstar/Klingon ship comes down here and says
CUT IT OUT!
 
2013-12-22 09:05:52 PM

p51d007: They better watch it with those lasers!  Just look how the pilots of airplanes & the FAA get
all pissed off if you point a laser at an aircraft.  Just think of what will happen in a few
thousand years, if some Borg/Deathstar/Klingon ship comes down here and says
CUT IT OUT!


They're multimode unstable resonaters.  Too much divergence, it'll just look like a flashlight.

*sad trombone*

rickythepenguin: Teriaki: SumFrequency said he helped work on some of those lasers.  Stupid smart people.

well shiat. then i think you out-CSB'd my CSB.


I CAN'T HELP IT

Teriaki: SumFrequency said he helped work on some of those lasers.  Stupid smart people.


\o/
 
2013-12-22 09:10:35 PM
Absolutely gorgeous. I wish we could see the night sky better from where I live. It makes we want to go punch a streetlight.
 
2013-12-22 10:20:20 PM
While you're at YouTube, search for 'fire in the sky blooper'.

It concerns the mountain the observatory is on.
 
2013-12-22 10:40:18 PM
TOO EARLY.

I was born too damn soon.

I wanna meet aliens dammit.

grump grump.

/can't watch that and still say we're alone
 
2013-12-22 10:51:15 PM
Mahalo Ricky, that was simply awesome!
 
2013-12-22 11:43:10 PM
Mahalo hoi. New dimensions in telescope choreography (snerk). Truly tho, this fantastic. Also pleased to see Laser Cat Approves!
 
2013-12-23 02:04:33 AM
Nice!  There are a couple other current grad students at the IfA who also have lots of fun doing astrophotography and time-lapses when they come over here to observe.  One of them is even a fellow Farker, who I won't rat out.  I also like doing those things, and have just been reminded yet again that I really, really need to buy another bulb release for long exposures and cheap-o intervalometry.

This is old, but I'll just leave it here...

img.fark.net

/Operating one of those scopes right now.
//Former IfA staffer
///NOT subby... this time.
 
2013-12-23 02:07:02 AM
Oh, and in the interest of pedantry, the lasers are most certainly not attached to the domes.  They're either attached to one side of the telescope truss (as may be the case for the Keck II laser, which is the oldest of them) or mounted at the center of the top spider behind the secondary mirror (which is the case for Subaru, and I think for Gemini and Keck I).

But anyway.
 
2013-12-23 05:39:40 AM
Mauna Kea is one of the most amazing places that I've ever visited. I loved star-gazing up there.
 
2013-12-23 08:49:33 AM
*sigh*

 I wish the night sky looked like that where I live.

/ usually too many clouds ( Pacific Northwest)
// too much light pollution, even in my small town....
 
2013-12-23 11:13:35 AM

styckx: Great video that really shows off how is Earth is spinning, not that the "sky is moving"..

What are the laser (Assuming) pointing to the sky for?  Are they trying to hit an object and time how long it took to receive a reflection?


Mitch Taylor approves
Chris Knight jiggles the switch
 
2013-12-23 06:32:24 PM

rickythepenguin: In the late 90s, i took a basic astronomy class at the University of Arizona, under Dr. Chris Impey, and one day he said "time" had unexpectedly opened up that night at the Mt. Lemmon observatory, and we had an exceedingly rar chance to see university-level astronomy on a field trip. I went, and we saw some amazing shiat.

there was a massive telescope and i remember seeing the Moon in astonishing detail, the TAs located some either Jupiter or Saturn's moons, then we turned to various Messier objects. the only one i specifically recall is Stephen's Quintet and I think eitther (perhaps both?) the Ring and/or Ghost Nebula. We looked at a ton of shiat that night, freezing balls, at about 8 or perhaps 9 thousand foot elevation.

/submitter


I have a co-worker who's a slightly more recent product of UA - when she was a student she used to operate the 61-inch (is that the Kuiper?) but I think that's on a different hill, at about 8200 feet.  She now sleeps a thousand feet higher than that, in between nights operating a 320+ inch at about 13650 feet.  Yay for upgrades. :)

(Of course out here, even the little telescopes for tourists to look through are above 9000 feet.)
 
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