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(Huffington Post)   Researchers discover three metals that potentially lead to memory loss: copper, aluminum and heavy   (huffingtonpost.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, memory losses, Dietary Reference Intake, mental functions, neurotoxins, copper, frontal lobes, amyloids, hemoglobin  
•       •       •

2629 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Dec 2013 at 10:34 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-12-22 10:40:33 AM  
zinc. zinc is heavy. i solved it.
 
2013-12-22 10:42:38 AM  
What's heavy metal?
 
2013-12-22 10:44:42 AM  
Close...but thrash metal is the one that will most likely lead to a concussion.
 
2013-12-22 10:55:03 AM  

Solty Dog: Close...but thrash metal is the one that will most likely lead to a concussion.


But death metal is the one that will most likely lead to rheumatoid arthritis.
 
2013-12-22 11:03:26 AM  
There's that word again. Heavy. Why are things so heavy in the future? Is there a problem with the earth's gravitational pull?
 
2013-12-22 11:09:14 AM  
Great headline, subby
 
2013-12-22 11:27:36 AM  
Aluminium is a prime suspect.  If you use a deodorant, you're fine.  If you use an anti-persperant, guess what?  I bet it has almunium as a compound.
 
2013-12-22 11:30:22 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-22 11:34:03 AM  
Uh-oh, better stop drinking scotch...
 
2013-12-22 12:24:10 PM  
You can't avoid aluminum. It's one of the most abundant elements in the earth's crust, and is in all the soil dust you inhale every time you go outside.
 
2013-12-22 12:31:09 PM  

mark12A: You can't avoid aluminum. It's one of the most abundant elements in the earth's crust, and is in all the soil dust you inhale every time you go outside.


See? Everyone keeps forgetting that
 
2013-12-22 12:38:36 PM  
FTA "Swap out your cast-iron pans for stainless steel. One study found that the iron content of spaghetti sauce increased more than nine times after being cooked in a cast-iron skillet."

You'll get my 30+ year old cast iron pans out of my cold dead kitchen, article writer.

/and only a noob cooks acidic foods in them anyway.
 
2013-12-22 12:52:29 PM  
I didn't do it......
 
2013-12-22 01:18:00 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: mark12A: You can't avoid aluminum. It's one of the most abundant elements in the earth's crust, and is in all the soil dust you inhale every time you go outside.

See? Everyone keeps forgetting that


images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-12-22 01:32:50 PM  
Geez! I just got done reading a FARK article (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/21/faith-in-scientists_n_448148 7.html) about how most Americans distrust polls and scientific reports and then this one pops up, making me wonder.

In the 18th and early 19th centuries, most folks cooked in cast iron. I don't recall any major epidemic of Alzheimer's -- though many such cases could have been considered just old age dementia. Cast iron was considered great because not only could it flavor the food, if aged properly, but would provide a measure of iron to the diet, which was often low.

Copper has been touted as beneficial for ages, especially as water pipes into homes because of its natural tendency to help disinfect the stuff. Copper was also considered a great cooking material, with some of the great chefs using exclusively copper pots and pans. Old advertisements of kitchens usually showed shiny copper pots hanging up.

The introduction of high heat resistant glass and ceramic cooking pots and pans in the 50s kind of replaced most of them. Pyrex came about during that time.

In the late 60s and early 70's, out came Teflon coatings and aluminum utensils. However the Teflon was applied much more thickly than today, did not wear off as quickly and seemed to be even better at non-stick.

Enamel coated cookware was popular also, but it was prone to chipping and once it chipped or cracked, it exposed the iron base metal and started rusting. Many an old Western movie shows cowboys settling in around a campfire, with a big enamel coffee pot simmering on the coals. You grand parents will probably tell you of the benefits of enamel coated pots and pans. (Or your great-grandparents.)

Aluminum popped up mainly due to the space program -- along with Teflon. A lot of stuff designed for space found other uses in the civilian sector. Doubts were had when the canning industry switched over much of it's products to aluminum but the pressure formed aluminum cans were considered cheaper and safer than the wielded steel ones, which could rust and early on used lead solder.

The switch from glass beverage bottles in the soda industry to an assortment of plastic ones soon brought an outcry of altered taste, potential leaching of toxins into the contents and an observation that the plastic, when burnt, gave off toxic fumes and smoke.

The beverage industries weighed the cost of making and reusing glass bottles, the usual loss in breakage in transport, the steel caps, the sterilization process to cleaning old bottles and the inevitable littering, which often resulted in shards of razor sharp glass. They considered the weight added to transport and the costs in fuel and stuck with plastic.

No one knew of the effects of aluminum because of it being such a real pain to extract in bulk quantities. No one also knew that aluminum could be blended with assorted metals to make newer, stronger versions.

Now, aluminum is in a huge amount of household materials including medications and deodorant. The possible link between it and Alzheimer's popped up about 10 years after the disease became recognized as separate from age related dementia. The ease with which aluminum can be forged into various containers has also made it very popular in the food industry.

I'm not sure of the problems related to iron and copper, but decades ago I recall questions being raised about aluminum. I also recall a process called 'tinning' where copper pots and pans had their cooking surfaces coated with a thin layer of tin.

Back in the 70's, companies produced very cheap cookware, which didn't last long, but I did notice, when filling one such well used aluminum pot with water, that if left overnight, bubbling started in small pits worn into the bottom. You could hear it fizz. It was some sort of reaction between the metals and the hard water I was using.
I switched to stainless steel pots then. Aluminum high end ones had become expensive.

So, here again, we have a conundrum; safe to use or not safe to use. One side firmly states the stuff is and one side states it isn't. One side has billions invested and has to consider the losses if they have to stop production. Naturally, they're going to dispute such reports with reports of their own.

Glass seems the only neutral product, but it is heavy and fragile. I have glass frying pans and pots and have managed to break a few in handling. Working in a K-mart stockroom years ago, I also got to see the breakage when pallets of inexpensive Libby Glass showed up on trucks.

Professionals have told me of the good and wonderful benefits of copper cookware, yet I own an old copper pan which has a clear layer of tinning on the interior.

Then again, I was a kid when the Big Vitamin Craze popped up. There weren't nearly so many types and varieties as there are today. Most of us never studied the contents because either they were not listed or we didn't care since various 'professionals' had assured us of how beneficial they were.

In my 20s I learned of Vitamin A poisoning. Then came Vitamin K problems. Around about that time I heard of a condition where people had too much iron in their blood. In my 30s I read of people being poisoned by silver and gold from deliberately ingesting the 'neutral' metals. (Silver poisoning will turn your skin corpse blue. You can recover from the disease, but the coloring remains forever.)

About the time I was reading of aluminum problems I was also surprised to discover that many city water plants used the metal in powdered form as an anti-flocking agent. Meaning, it was dumped in murky but safe water, where the bits of organic trash clumped on the stuff and settled to the bottom, making the water clear.

Actually, there is the high possibility that this article is right -- especially when combined with vitamin supplements. It seems to make sense. Then again, there's the possibility that it's BS, like so many similar articles have been.

It depends on the agenda the author had.
 
2013-12-22 01:49:19 PM  

Rik01: Geez! I just got done reading a FARK article (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/21/faith-in-scientists_n_448148 7.html) about how most Americans distrust polls and scientific reports and then this one pops up, making me wonder.

In the 18th and early 19th centuries, most folks cooked in cast iron. I don't recall any major epidemic of Alzheimer's -- though many such cases could have been considered just old age dementia. Cast iron was considered great because not only could it flavor the food, if aged properly, but would provide a measure of iron to the diet, which was often low.

Copper has been touted as beneficial for ages, especially as water pipes into homes because of its natural tendency to help disinfect the stuff. Copper was also considered a great cooking material, with some of the great chefs using exclusively copper pots and pans. Old advertisements of kitchens usually showed shiny copper pots hanging up.

The introduction of high heat resistant glass and ceramic cooking pots and pans in the 50s kind of replaced most of them. Pyrex came about during that time.

In the late 60s and early 70's, out came Teflon coatings and aluminum utensils. However the Teflon was applied much more thickly than today, did not wear off as quickly and seemed to be even better at non-stick.

Enamel coated cookware was popular also, but it was prone to chipping and once it chipped or cracked, it exposed the iron base metal and started rusting. Many an old Western movie shows cowboys settling in around a campfire, with a big enamel coffee pot simmering on the coals. You grand parents will probably tell you of the benefits of enamel coated pots and pans. (Or your great-grandparents.)

Aluminum popped up mainly due to the space program -- along with Teflon. A lot of stuff designed for space found other uses in the civilian sector. Doubts were had when the canning industry switched over much of it's products to aluminum but the pressure formed aluminum cans were considered cheaper and safer than the wielded steel ones, which could rust and early on used lead solder.

The switch from glass beverage bottles in the soda industry to an assortment of plastic ones soon brought an outcry of altered taste, potential leaching of toxins into the contents and an observation that the plastic, when burnt, gave off toxic fumes and smoke.

The beverage industries weighed the cost of making and reusing glass bottles, the usual loss in breakage in transport, the steel caps, the sterilization process to cleaning old bottles and the inevitable littering, which often resulted in shards of razor sharp glass. They considered the weight added to transport and the costs in fuel and stuck with plastic.

No one knew of the effects of aluminum because of it being such a real pain to extract in bulk quantities. No one also knew that aluminum could be blended with assorted metals to make newer, stronger versions.

Now, aluminum is in a huge amount of household materials including medications and deodorant. The possible link between it and Alzheimer's popped up about 10 years after the disease became recognized as separate from age related dementia. The ease with which aluminum can be forged into various containers has also made it very popular in the food industry.

I'm not sure of the problems related to iron and copper, but decades ago I recall questions being raised about aluminum. I also recall a process called 'tinning' where copper pots and pans had their cooking surfaces coated with a thin layer of tin.

Back in the 70's, companies produced very cheap cookware, which didn't last long, but I did notice, when filling one such well used aluminum pot with water, that if left overnight, bubbling started in small pits worn into the bottom. You could hear it fizz. It was some sort of reaction between the metals and the hard water I was using.
I switched to stainless steel pots then. Aluminum high end ones had become expensive.

So, here again, we have a conundrum; safe to use or not safe to use. One side firmly states the stuff is and one side states it isn't. One side has billions invested and has to consider the losses if they have to stop production. Naturally, they're going to dispute such reports with reports of their own.

Glass seems the only neutral product, but it is heavy and fragile. I have glass frying pans and pots and have managed to break a few in handling. Working in a K-mart stockroom years ago, I also got to see the breakage when pallets of inexpensive Libby Glass showed up on trucks.

Professionals have told me of the good and wonderful benefits of copper cookware, yet I own an old copper pan which has a clear layer of tinning on the interior.

Then again, I was a kid when the Big Vitamin Craze popped up. There weren't nearly so many types and varieties as there are today. Most of us never studied the contents because either they were not listed or we didn't care since various 'professionals' had assured us of how beneficial they were.

In my 20s I learned of Vitamin A poisoning. Then came Vitamin K problems. Around about that time I heard of a condition where people had too much iron in their blood. In my 30s I read of people being poisoned by silver and gold from deliberately ingesting the 'neutral' metals. (Silver poisoning will turn your skin corpse blue. You can recover from the disease, but the coloring remains forever.)

About the time I was reading of aluminum problems I was also surprised to discover that many city water plants used the metal in powdered form as an anti-flocking agent. Meaning, it was dumped in murky but safe water, where the bits of organic trash clumped on the stuff and settled to the bottom, making the water clear.

Actually, there is the high possibility that this article is right -- especially when combined with vitamin supplements. It seems to make sense. Then again, there's the possibility that it's BS, like so many similar articles have been.

It depends on the agenda the author had.


They don't call it the "Geek" tab for nothing...
 
2013-12-22 04:11:43 PM  
to get iron to transfer from iron cookware to food would mean a person is using a bare iron surface?  as in not using it correctly.
Aluminum is in the air we breath, the water, the plants but does not come significantly from cooking in aluminum pans.
cooking in copper does not contribute an increase in copper In the diet unless you subscribe to homeopathy, 1 part per quadrillion.

these are the facts from Scientific sources, but this weird author can say "Fear! Fear! Fear!"  and get on Fark.
 
2013-12-22 04:38:45 PM  
At least we stopped using lead as a sweetener...
 
2013-12-22 10:31:57 PM  

Somaticasual: At least we stopped using lead as a sweetener...


But it's delicious and nutritious! Why do you think our friends in China put it in everything!
 
2013-12-23 12:42:24 AM  

Rik01: It depends on the agenda the author had.


You sound almost like a guy who married one of my ex-girlfriends and had two daughters. I had to click your profile: either you're not him or you ARE one of my very own CIA agents.
 
2013-12-23 01:06:30 AM  
What about making water pipes and cookware of alloys of whatever metals we have an abundance of in whatever combination is durable and economical, bastard steels or bronzes that could be made from scrap? Wouldn't the other metals bind the copper and/or aluminum so they don't leach, for example?
 
2013-12-23 06:21:00 AM  
FTFA: Go easy on meat

media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
/gimme the steak, I'll take the dementia risk
 
2013-12-23 11:07:45 AM  

syrynxx: Aluminium is a prime suspect.  If you use a deodorant, you're fine.  If you use an anti-persperant, guess what?  I bet it has almunium as a compound.



that's why i use only deoderant.  this Nation excels in slowly poisoning its citizens for a buck.

we aren't very good at making decent food anymore either.  so much processing.
 
2013-12-23 11:12:28 AM  
the best way is just to accept that everything is safe and to just buy/consume it.  even drugs are safe.


that way, no worries.
 
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