If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(KTLA Los Angeles)   After 63 years, Korean War MIA Joseph Gantt's remains return home. His 94-year old widow, who never re-married, greets his coffin, rises from her wheelchair. LAX is dusty   (ktla.com) divider line 80
    More: Hero, Joseph Gantt, Korean War  
•       •       •

7344 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Dec 2013 at 6:55 PM (16 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



80 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-12-21 02:59:28 PM
Welcome home, Sarge. Rest In Peace.
 
2013-12-21 04:27:25 PM
Damn these onions I'm cutting
 
2013-12-21 04:37:18 PM
I guess the good thing is she lived long enough to welcome her husband home. Damn, I need a tissue.
 
2013-12-21 06:58:13 PM
Thats like Jurassic Bark level sad and touching.
 
2013-12-21 06:58:41 PM
Job well done. Rest in peace, Sgt.
...and what a gal. She waited.

My allergies are acting up.
 
2013-12-21 07:00:54 PM
So like...  she's available now?

/You knew some one was going to say it...

Yes, dusty and etc...
 
2013-12-21 07:02:08 PM
And just in time for Christmas.

I totally has a sad.
 
2013-12-21 07:06:27 PM
I want so bad to troll but it feels so wrong!!!!!  Ugh!!!!!

Okay-- here it goes:

You think she'd at least have got her hair did.

Wow. That was tough. But I managed to get it done.  Nice lady. Real patriot.  God bless 'me both and the right to troll he helped defend.
 
2013-12-21 07:08:19 PM
Touching story, but would have been nice to know the circumstances of his disappearance.
 
2013-12-21 07:09:22 PM
Not that I wish death on people, but I hope she now passes peacefully into the next world to spend more time with him.  She's earned it and then some.
 
2013-12-21 07:09:47 PM
Yeah, it doesn't get more solemn than that
 
2013-12-21 07:11:08 PM
RIP Sgt.

I fully expect the lady to not stick around for much longer. She has closure now, and has been waiting  a long time to welcome him home. Be at peace sister, and know your better half is waiting for you.
 
2013-12-21 07:11:30 PM
I'd like to know why he was returned now, specially with what's currently happening in North Korea.
 
2013-12-21 07:12:57 PM
Godspeed, Sgt. Gantt.
 
2013-12-21 07:13:42 PM
'Post-humONously'? Really, cute blonde bimbo who is only on TV 'cos you're a cute blonde? Fark you.

Oh the story is cool as hell, by the way.
 
2013-12-21 07:18:19 PM

cameroncrazy1984: Touching story, but would have been nice to know the circumstances of his disappearance.


War.
 
2013-12-21 07:21:16 PM
/O

/for both
 
2013-12-21 07:24:46 PM

talkertopc: I'd like to know why he was returned now, specially with what's currently happening in North Korea.


Some bureaucrat in the Defense Department's women's advisory committee decided 63 years of peace and quiet was far more than any married man is entitled to.
 
2013-12-21 07:28:51 PM

cameroncrazy1984: Touching story, but would have been nice to know the circumstances of his disappearance.


Did you not pay attention? He was a medic in the Korean war, captured in 1950 and died a few months later in a Nork prison camp. Being the assholes that they are, we've not been able to get his body back all this time. It's not that mysterious.

In fact, without knowing more, I can guess he was likely lost at Chosin, when MacArthur decided he was going to take on the entire Chinese Red Army with a battalion of Marines, with a combined US loss of 15,000 dead and missing. Over half of those taken captive did not survive the first winter.

Glad the Sergeant finally made it home.
 
2013-12-21 07:44:48 PM

Gyrfalcon: cameroncrazy1984: Touching story, but would have been nice to know the circumstances of his disappearance.

Did you not pay attention? He was a medic in the Korean war, captured in 1950 and died a few months later in a Nork prison camp. Being the assholes that they are, we've not been able to get his body back all this time. It's not that mysterious.

In fact, without knowing more, I can guess he was likely lost at Chosin, when MacArthur decided he was going to take on the entire Chinese Red Army with a battalion of Marines, with a combined US loss of 15,000 dead and missing. Over half of those taken captive did not survive the first winter.

Glad the Sergeant finally made it home.


Pretty much this
 
2013-12-21 07:45:02 PM
63 years? That's a big chart.
 
2013-12-21 07:47:43 PM
Two heros.
 
2013-12-21 07:49:33 PM
Welcome back, Sarnt. Good to have you home.
 
2013-12-21 07:51:59 PM

Oldiron_79: Thats like Jurassic Bark level sad and touching.


No.

As much as I like that show and as much as that episode touches me, one situation involves real people and the other is a cartoon.
 
2013-12-21 07:55:08 PM

Gyrfalcon: cameroncrazy1984: Touching story, but would have been nice to know the circumstances of his disappearance.

Did you not pay attention? He was a medic in the Korean war, captured in 1950 and died a few months later in a Nork prison camp. Being the assholes that they are, we've not been able to get his body back all this time. It's not that mysterious.

In fact, without knowing more, I can guess he was likely lost at Chosin, when MacArthur decided he was going to take on the entire Chinese Red Army with a battalion of Marines, with a combined US loss of 15,000 dead and missing. Over half of those taken captive did not survive the first winter.

Glad the Sergeant finally made it home.


According to this LA Times article, his position was overrun near a place called Kunur-ri'.
 
2013-12-21 08:00:04 PM

BlackMtnMan: Two heros.


heroes
 
2013-12-21 08:02:17 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: 63 years? That's a big chart.


Frysquinting.jpg
 
2013-12-21 08:03:22 PM
Real life is bigger than Hollywood. Crushed.
 
2013-12-21 08:08:39 PM

Thelyphthoric: Oldiron_79: Thats like Jurassic Bark level sad and touching.

No.

As much as I like that show and as much as that episode touches me, one situation involves real people and the other is a cartoon.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-12-21 08:26:01 PM
That's heartbreaking.  But at least now she has closure.
 
2013-12-21 08:26:08 PM

John Buck 41: 'Post-humONously'? Really, cute blonde bimbo who is only on TV 'cos you're a cute blonde? Fark you.

Oh the story is cool as hell, by the way.


it's a perfectly cromulent word.
 
2013-12-21 08:32:52 PM
She doesn't look a day over 120.

/we kid
//she should be very proud
 
2013-12-21 08:41:52 PM
Not really clear on what the 3 amigos have to do with this.img.fark.net
 
2013-12-21 08:44:42 PM
So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.
 
2013-12-21 09:01:27 PM

saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.


They did it all for you, internet troll.

You're welcome.
 
2013-12-21 09:04:01 PM
My feels...
 
2013-12-21 09:08:58 PM

Nabb1: I guess the good thing is she lived long enough to welcome her husband home. Damn, I need a tissue.


Well said. That picture is hard to look at.
 
2013-12-21 09:09:01 PM
Some things just don't warrant humor.
 
2013-12-21 09:15:06 PM

stonelotus: John Buck 41: 'Post-humONously'? Really, cute blonde bimbo who is only on TV 'cos you're a cute blonde? Fark you.

Oh the story is cool as hell, by the way.

it's a perfectly cromulent word.


While I can find plenty of references to that word in government documents, I can't find anything that refers to it as an accepted spelling.  Is this special military use or something?
 
2013-12-21 09:22:45 PM

saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.


Feel free to leave, asshole.
 
2013-12-21 09:31:07 PM

Gyrfalcon: cameroncrazy1984: Touching story, but would have been nice to know the circumstances of his disappearance.

Did you not pay attention? He was a medic in the Korean war, captured in 1950 and died a few months later in a Nork prison camp. Being the assholes that they are, we've not been able to get his body back all this time. It's not that mysterious.

In fact, without knowing more, I can guess he was likely lost at Chosin, when MacArthur decided he was going to take on the entire Chinese Red Army with a battalion of Marines, with a combined US loss of 15,000 dead and missing. Over half of those taken captive did not survive the first winter.

Glad the Sergeant finally made it home.


Lots of guys were captured and simply never heard from again. The NorKs were total and absolute assholes. The Chinese, at least, would do prisoner exchanges and the like. Read "The Coldest Winter" or "This Kind of War". Korea was pretty much a cluster all around. MacArthur killed an awful lot of American troops with his total disregard of intelligence. Vietnam was bad I think Korea was far worse. Truly the forgotten war. A miserable, cold, filthy war.
 
2013-12-21 09:34:25 PM

saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.


Folderol, dude. Did someone tell you the thread had a not-so-fresh feeling?
 
2013-12-21 09:48:56 PM
I half expected her to be somber in the photos; I mean, 63 years go by, I figured the pain of loss had at least grown to numbness.

I was very, very wrong, based on her photos.  That poor woman looks like she's feeling his loss as if it were the first day she was told he was missing.  Now, she knows he's truly gone.

I'm so glad I don't have to talk IRL, because my throat is closed up and my eyes are full of tears.  Rest easy, soldier, and may your widow have peace for the rest of her days.
 
2013-12-21 10:06:08 PM
trotsky Korea was pretty much a cluster all around. MacArthur killed an awful lot of American troops with his total disregard of intelligence.

Yeah, for all his great P.R. MacArthur was no Patton, wiped out a lot of his men-the Bataan Death March was basically every squid from New Mexico getting set up by MacArthur.  The guy's burial site's just as ostentatious, in what used to be Norfolk City Hall  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=656&PIpi=83014
 
2013-12-21 10:14:22 PM
The more we call these guys "heros," the more likely that we'll keep having more wars and more people sent home in body bags. There's hasn't been a challenge to our national sovereignty since the War of 1812. Let's call these guys what they really are: chumps and cannon fodder. The guy was a sucker to throw his life away in a war that had absolutely nothing to do with defending this country.
 
2013-12-21 10:15:39 PM

Gyrfalcon: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

Feel free to leave, asshole.


I was just trying to point out that not everyone who dies in a war is a hero. They are not. People do their duty and sometimes die from it. Think policemen and firefighters among them. The heroes are the ones who go above and beyond what they are called to do.

I lost a friend in the VN war on hamburger hill. Another was lost more recently in Iraq. One was a draftee, the other a volunteer. One did was he was ordered to do, the other what he wanted to do.

Neither are heroes. They were just doing a job. Nothing more, nothing less.

This probably makes no sense to you.

/not leaving because of your opinion
 
2013-12-21 10:20:33 PM

DrPainMD: The more we call these guys "heros," the more likely that we'll keep having more wars and more people sent home in body bags. There's hasn't been a challenge to our national sovereignty since the War of 1812. Let's call these guys what they really are: chumps and cannon fodder. The guy was a sucker to throw his life away in a war that had absolutely nothing to do with defending this country.


He began his career in WWII. Was he a chump then, too? Was everyone who died in that war a chump? Show your work.
 
2013-12-21 10:27:21 PM

saturn badger: Gyrfalcon: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

Feel free to leave, asshole.

I was just trying to point out that not everyone who dies in a war is a hero. They are not. People do their duty and sometimes die from it. Think policemen and firefighters among them. The heroes are the ones who go above and beyond what they are called to do.

I lost a friend in the VN war on hamburger hill. Another was lost more recently in Iraq. One was a draftee, the other a volunteer. One did was he was ordered to do, the other what he wanted to do.

Neither are heroes. They were just doing a job. Nothing more, nothing less.

This probably makes no sense to you.

/not leaving because of your opinion


Seems we have a difference in opinion in the definition of "hero."

I consider anybody who willingly gives their life to save another a "hero," and in military situations, even when it's on orders, when one guy dies, there's a damn good chance he did something to save somebody in the process.  I consider any firefighter, policeman, or soldier who dies in the line of duty a hero, because they go to work each day knowing there is a good chance they might not come home.

I wonder what you consider "above and beyond,", what you consider a "hero."
 
2013-12-21 10:32:49 PM

andyofne: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

They did it all for you, internet troll.

You're welcome.


Really? Prove it. No one in the service does it for me. There are numerous reasons people join up. Many times it is because they can't find work. Other times it is to get away from the family. Maybe education benefits.

For me? I highly doubt any service men care about me. If you mean society in general maybe some do but I think most do it for other reasons.
 
2013-12-21 10:39:26 PM
Dammitsomuch.

Reminding me that I have emotions other than spite.

Fark you, subby.
 
2013-12-21 10:46:26 PM

vicioushobbit: Seems we have a difference in opinion in the definition of "hero."

I consider anybody who willingly gives their life to save another a "hero," and in military situations, even when it's on orders, when one guy dies, there's a damn good chance he did something to save somebody in the process.  I consider any firefighter, policeman, or soldier who dies in the line of duty a hero, because they go to work each day knowing there is a good chance they might not come home.

I wonder what you consider "above and beyond,", what you consider a "hero."


In this story the person involved didn't willingly give their life for anyone so I'm guessing your definition of hero does not work here. We have a disconnect to when you say when every firefighter, policeman or soldier who dies in the line of duty he is a hero.  I go along with your idea that if someone willingly gives their life to save someone else they achieve hero status.

But not everyone who dies in the line of duty is a hero. So a roof falls on a firefighter and kills him. Is he a hero if he is not dying to save the life of the puppy crying in the corner? Or is he if he is trying to save the puppy? I know this is splitting stupid straws but you get my point or I hope you do.

Just choosing a dangerous profession and getting killed while doing it does not make them a hero for doing so. I do admire those who do though.
 
2013-12-21 10:56:51 PM

saturn badger: vicioushobbit: Seems we have a difference in opinion in the definition of "hero."

I consider anybody who willingly gives their life to save another a "hero," and in military situations, even when it's on orders, when one guy dies, there's a damn good chance he did something to save somebody in the process.  I consider any firefighter, policeman, or soldier who dies in the line of duty a hero, because they go to work each day knowing there is a good chance they might not come home.

I wonder what you consider "above and beyond,", what you consider a "hero."

In this story the person involved didn't willingly give their life for anyone so I'm guessing your definition of hero does not work here. We have a disconnect to when you say when every firefighter, policeman or soldier who dies in the line of duty he is a hero.  I go along with your idea that if someone willingly gives their life to save someone else they achieve hero status.

But not everyone who dies in the line of duty is a hero. So a roof falls on a firefighter and kills him. Is he a hero if he is not dying to save the life of the puppy crying in the corner? Or is he if he is trying to save the puppy? I know this is splitting stupid straws but you get my point or I hope you do.

Just choosing a dangerous profession and getting killed while doing it does not make them a hero for doing so. I do admire those who do though.


My definition of hero has been bolded so you can see that yes, i do consider this guy a hero.

A firefighter gets in her truck on his way to a call and knows that she can die from a number of hazards.  But she goes anyway.  I don't care if she's going because of a paycheck, because the pay ain't that great.  Most of them do it because they know if they don't answer the call, people will die.  I've known several volunteer firefighters in my life, and I wish I had the determination they do.

I don't care if the police officer got his uniform just because he thought it had a great pension, or that it'd get him laid.  When he goes in his car out in public, he can die.  He knows, and he still goes to answer the call.  Short of a proven case of cop dying while participating in corruption, I say any police officer that dies in the line of duty is a hero.

A soldier to you may just be a shmuck who couldn't get a better job or couldn't be bothered to go to college, but to so many of them, they are doing what they do because they are willing to lay their lives down to defend their country.  They may not be able to articulate how they feel their death might do this, nor be able to be a bigger part than a nameless grunt, but they sign up knowing the kinds of hostile situations they may be sent.

These are not the only heroes.  Anybody who goes out of their way to save another is a hero, in my eyes.  That kid who went into the road to pull out the dog who was hit? I call him a hero.  The video from forever ago where one dog goes to save another that had been hit by a car? I call THAT dog a hero, too.  The security guard who caught the falling baby at the airport? Hero. 

I find myself surrounded by heroes, and it's wonderful.  There's a lot of evil in this world, but there's still plenty of people to stand against it.

/sorry for the long post and any incoherence.
//not sober
 
2013-12-21 11:05:19 PM

DrBenway: DrPainMD: The more we call these guys "heros," the more likely that we'll keep having more wars and more people sent home in body bags. There's hasn't been a challenge to our national sovereignty since the War of 1812. Let's call these guys what they really are: chumps and cannon fodder. The guy was a sucker to throw his life away in a war that had absolutely nothing to do with defending this country.

He began his career in WWII. Was he a chump then, too? Was everyone who died in that war a chump? Show your work.


See the bolded/underlined line, above. If we had stayed out of WW1, WW2 never would have happened. If we hadn't done everything we could to get the Japanese to attack (which, according to the "pre-emptive" strike supporters, was totally defensive [google: flying tigers]), we would have had no excuse to enter WW2. There's nothing defensive about building and maintaining an empire, and politicians don't care how many people die helping them achieve their political/financial ambitions. So, yes, those who fought in WW2 were also chumps.
 
2013-12-21 11:20:59 PM

vicioushobbit: There's a lot of evil in this world, but there's still plenty of people to stand against it.


That's oddly inspiring.
 
2013-12-21 11:27:47 PM
Lena Riggi Basilone approves this story.
 
2013-12-21 11:33:54 PM

vicioushobbit: saturn badger: vicioushobbit: Seems we have a difference in opinion in the definition of "hero."

I consider anybody who willingly gives their life to save another a "hero," and in military situations, even when it's on orders, when one guy dies, there's a damn good chance he did something to save somebody in the process.  I consider any firefighter, policeman, or soldier who dies in the line of duty a hero, because they go to work each day knowing there is a good chance they might not come home.

I wonder what you consider "above and beyond,", what you consider a "hero."

In this story the person involved didn't willingly give their life for anyone so I'm guessing your definition of hero does not work here. We have a disconnect to when you say when every firefighter, policeman or soldier who dies in the line of duty he is a hero.  I go along with your idea that if someone willingly gives their life to save someone else they achieve hero status.

But not everyone who dies in the line of duty is a hero. So a roof falls on a firefighter and kills him. Is he a hero if he is not dying to save the life of the puppy crying in the corner? Or is he if he is trying to save the puppy? I know this is splitting stupid straws but you get my point or I hope you do.

Just choosing a dangerous profession and getting killed while doing it does not make them a hero for doing so. I do admire those who do though.

My definition of hero has been bolded so you can see that yes, i do consider this guy a hero.

A firefighter gets in her truck on his way to a call and knows that she can die from a number of hazards.  But she goes anyway.  I don't care if she's going because of a paycheck, because the pay ain't that great.  Most of them do it because they know if they don't answer the call, people will die.  I've known several volunteer firefighters in my life, and I wish I had the determination they do.

I don't care if the police officer got his uniform just because he thought it had a gr ...


Granted and a good reply. I know a police man turned fire marshall turned bomb expert. To him it is a job. Each step of the way was from more money. He went to Iraq teaching them how to disarm bombs. If he died disarming one we have a dilemma. Would that make him a hero or just someone who lived on the edge for the money?

We live on a fine edge on who is a hero and who is not. Do we consider all people who work in dangerous professions heroes? Where do we draw the line? How about the people who repair our highways every day? The also live in a dangerous situation. One drunk driver and they could be history. Tow truck drivers who work the highways. I used to do mobile trailer repair and many times late at night on the highways. Believe me it was scary sometimes changing big rig tires on the highway roadside late at night. If I was killed was I a hero?

Nope. I was just doing my job. Thank deity I no longer do that. It was not fun.

Choosing a profession does not automatically make someone a hero. Sometimes it is just a job.
 
2013-12-21 11:38:02 PM

RedPhoenix122: vicioushobbit: There's a lot of evil in this world, but there's still plenty of people to stand against it.

That's oddly inspiring.


I can't claim it as an original thought, though I can't remember where I gleaned it.  I've held onto it closely, though, because I've been through shiat and I've seen others go through even worse, and when you read news articles (especially paired with some comments on FARK) and you go WHY?!...knowing to look for the people who are fighting, and trying to find a way to stand with them, that keeps me going.
 
2013-12-21 11:43:28 PM

saturn badger: vicioushobbit: saturn badger: vicioushobbit: Seems we have a difference in opinion in the definition of "hero."

I consider anybody who willingly gives their life to save another a "hero," and in military situations, even when it's on orders, when one guy dies, there's a damn good chance he did something to save somebody in the process.  I consider any firefighter, policeman, or soldier who dies in the line of duty a hero, because they go to work each day knowing there is a good chance they might not come home.

I wonder what you consider "above and beyond,", what you consider a "hero."

In this story the person involved didn't willingly give their life for anyone so I'm guessing your definition of hero does not work here. We have a disconnect to when you say when every firefighter, policeman or soldier who dies in the line of duty he is a hero.  I go along with your idea that if someone willingly gives their life to save someone else they achieve hero status.

But not everyone who dies in the line of duty is a hero. So a roof falls on a firefighter and kills him. Is he a hero if he is not dying to save the life of the puppy crying in the corner? Or is he if he is trying to save the puppy? I know this is splitting stupid straws but you get my point or I hope you do.

Just choosing a dangerous profession and getting killed while doing it does not make them a hero for doing so. I do admire those who do though.

My definition of hero has been bolded so you can see that yes, i do consider this guy a hero.

A firefighter gets in her truck on his way to a call and knows that she can die from a number of hazards.  But she goes anyway.  I don't care if she's going because of a paycheck, because the pay ain't that great.  Most of them do it because they know if they don't answer the call, people will die.  I've known several volunteer firefighters in my life, and I wish I had the determination they do.

I don't care if the police officer got his uniform just because he thoug ...


I never gave much thought to construction workers, etc, being heroes. 

You have a good point.  I guess I will just have to reiterate that certain professions, the moment you sign up for it, you know the risk involved.  I get the impression other dangerous positions don't have the same advertisement of risk.  Hell, I the first time I worked in a laboratory I had an idea there'd be SOME risk, but I didn't have a clue there'd be carcinogens, mutagens, highly concentrated acids, and more.  I wouldn't say I was a hero there just for working day-to-day.  I wouldn't say I was a hero if I died working there.  But if my coworker dies because she got between me and danger, I'd sure call her a hero.

/and feel bad about it the rest of my life :(
 
2013-12-22 12:02:37 AM

saturn badger: andyofne: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

They did it all for you, internet troll.

You're welcome.

Really? Prove it. No one in the service does it for me. There are numerous reasons people join up. Many times it is because they can't find work. Other times it is to get away from the family. Maybe education benefits.

For me? I highly doubt any service men care about me. If you mean society in general maybe some do but I think most do it for other reasons.



I can't talk for all service members, however I will be honest I joined for selfish motives. That being said, it still doesn't subtract from the fact that at the end of the day, the reason we can talk so freely and live the way we do is specifically because of the men and women who sacrifice their time. To add to that, the knowledge of the service that many others and myself provide make it all worth it. I know someone on here will have a snarky comment and that is fine, you have the luxury of ignorance. RIP Sgt Gantt.
 
2013-12-22 12:07:30 AM

vicioushobbit: I never gave much thought to construction workers, etc, being heroes. 

You have a good point.  I guess I will just have to reiterate that certain professions, the moment you sign up for it, you know the risk involved.  I get the impression other dangerous positions don't have the same advertisement of risk.  Hell, I the first time I worked in a laboratory I had an idea there'd be SOME risk, but I didn't have a clue there'd be carcinogens, mutagens, highly concentrated acids, and more.  I wouldn't say I was a hero there just for working day-to-day.  I wouldn't say I was a hero if I died working there.  But if my coworker dies because she got between me and danger, I'd sure call her a hero.

/and feel bad about it the rest of my life :(


Thanks.

The deal is we need to think about what the definition of hero is. That is why I was attacked here. I didn't agree with the definition.

Years ago I was saw a SUV overturn on a bad curve and overturn in a cemetary. It happens every so often. People here don't know that curve. Really rough in the rain.

I ran over and helped the people in the accident. Was I a hero? No, I was not. I was merely helping people in a bad situation until the authorities arrived. Would I be branded a hero if I had helped save a life? Maybe but I would not accept it. I was just trying to help.

A hero is a label people give to others. Real heroes decline the label. Cue Chesley Burnett "Sully" Sullenberger. Everyone called him a hero but he rejected it. He said he was just doing his job.
 
2013-12-22 12:09:08 AM

saturn badger: vicioushobbit: I never gave much thought to construction workers, etc, being heroes. 

You have a good point.  I guess I will just have to reiterate that certain professions, the moment you sign up for it, you know the risk involved.  I get the impression other dangerous positions don't have the same advertisement of risk.  Hell, I the first time I worked in a laboratory I had an idea there'd be SOME risk, but I didn't have a clue there'd be carcinogens, mutagens, highly concentrated acids, and more.  I wouldn't say I was a hero there just for working day-to-day.  I wouldn't say I was a hero if I died working there.  But if my coworker dies because she got between me and danger, I'd sure call her a hero.

/and feel bad about it the rest of my life :(

Thanks.

The deal is we need to think about what the definition of hero is. That is why I was attacked here. I didn't agree with the definition.

Years ago I was saw a SUV overturn on a bad curve and overturn in a cemetary. It happens every so often. People here don't know that curve. Really rough in the rain.

I ran over and helped the people in the accident. Was I a hero? No, I was not. I was merely helping people in a bad situation until the authorities arrived. Would I be branded a hero if I had helped save a life? Maybe but I would not accept it. I was just trying to help.

A hero is a label people give to others. Real heroes decline the label. Cue Chesley Burnett "Sully" Sullenberger. Everyone called him a hero but he rejected it. He said he was just doing his job.


FWIW, I would say you were a hero for stopping to help.  A good number of good samaritans are injured trying to help people.  That was a risk you took to save somebody else.  Just because you don't accept that label doesn't mean that others don't deserve it for doing the same thing.

In my opinion, anyway.
 
2013-12-22 12:18:47 AM

DrPainMD: DrBenway: DrPainMD: The more we call these guys "heros," the more likely that we'll keep having more wars and more people sent home in body bags. There's hasn't been a challenge to our national sovereignty since the War of 1812. Let's call these guys what they really are: chumps and cannon fodder. The guy was a sucker to throw his life away in a war that had absolutely nothing to do with defending this country.

He began his career in WWII. Was he a chump then, too? Was everyone who died in that war a chump? Show your work.

See the bolded/underlined line, above. If we had stayed out of WW1, WW2 never would have happened. If we hadn't done everything we could to get the Japanese to attack (which, according to the "pre-emptive" strike supporters, was totally defensive [google: flying tigers]), we would have had no excuse to enter WW2. There's nothing defensive about building and maintaining an empire, and politicians don't care how many people die helping them achieve their political/financial ambitions. So, yes, those who fought in WW2 were also chumps.


Mind blown.
 
2013-12-22 12:25:45 AM

pancakemonster: saturn badger: andyofne: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

They did it all for you, internet troll.

You're welcome.

Really? Prove it. No one in the service does it for me. There are numerous reasons people join up. Many times it is because they can't find work. Other times it is to get away from the family. Maybe education benefits.

For me? I highly doubt any service men care about me. If you mean society in general maybe some do but I think most do it for other reasons.


I can't talk for all service members, however I will be honest I joined for selfish motives. That being said, it still doesn't subtract from the fact that at the end of the day, the reason we can talk so freely and live the way we do is specifically because of the men and women who sacrifice their time. To add to that, the knowledge of the service that many others and myself provide make it all worth it. I know someone on here will have a snarky comment and that is fine, you have the luxury of ignorance. RIP Sgt Gantt.


Some here took my comment in the wrong way. I do appreciate the sacrafices some do for our society. Low pay, odd hours, away from home. I was in a hospital with an illness. The nurse worked odd hours and her husband was a fireman. They basically passed each other on the way out the door sometimes. These kind of people do unnoticed good for us but they move on with their lives and deal with it. It is the way they live and can change it but they do what they do and we benefit from it. They are to be thanked for it. Ambulance drivers and paramedics fit in this category.

I think there are many people working in many ways that we take for granted that we should be thankful they are there. Heck, I love the power pole people when a transformer blows and it is the dead of winter. And they can be electrocuted working in the dark.

And agreed. RIP.
 
2013-12-22 12:34:35 AM

saturn badger: pancakemonster: saturn badger: andyofne: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

They did it all for you, internet troll.

You're welcome.

Really? Prove it. No one in the service does it for me. There are numerous reasons people join up. Many times it is because they can't find work. Other times it is to get away from the family. Maybe education benefits.

For me? I highly doubt any service men care about me. If you mean society in general maybe some do but I think most do it for other reasons.


I can't talk for all service members, however I will be honest I joined for selfish motives. That being said, it still doesn't subtract from the fact that at the end of the day, the reason we can talk so freely and live the way we do is specifically because of the men and women who sacrifice their time. To add to that, the knowledge of the service that many others and myself provide make it all worth it. I know someone on here will have a snarky comment and that is fine, you have the luxury of ignorance. RIP Sgt Gantt.

Some here took my comment in the wrong way. I do appreciate the sacrafices some do for our society. Low pay, odd hours, away from home. I was in a hospital with an illness. The nurse worked odd hours and her husband was a fireman. They basically passed each other on the way out the door sometimes. These kind of people do unnoticed good for us but they move on with their lives and deal with it. It is the way they live and can change it but they do what they do and we benefit from it. They are to be thanked for it. Ambulance drivers and paramedics fit in this category.

I think there are many people working in many ways that we take for granted that we should be thankful they are there. Heck, I love the power pole people when a transformer blows and it is the dead of winter. And they can be electrocuted working in the dark.

And agreed. RIP.


Agreed, along with the trash guy. I can't imagine how disgusting things would get ..... All levity aside though that was what I was getting at. Just because it is common doesn't make it unheroic.

(Also I did take what you said out of context my bad....)
 
2013-12-22 12:34:49 AM

vicioushobbit: FWIW, I would say you were a hero for stopping to help.  A good number of good samaritans are injured trying to help people.  That was a risk you took to save somebody else.  Just because you don't accept that label doesn't mean that others don't deserve it for doing the same thing.

In my opinion, anyway.


Thanks. I would hope everyone would. It was not a heroic thing. I didn't save anyone from jumping off a bridge. To tell the truth it was craddling a child in my arms and trying to keep her calm. Others were helping the other children and adults. It was a sort of community effort in the end. Good to see.

To end the story no one was majorly hurt. Minor scrapes and bruises. Seat belts are a wonderful thing.

And there was no risk to me in this one. It was well off the road.
 
2013-12-22 12:41:39 AM

saturn badger: vicioushobbit: FWIW, I would say you were a hero for stopping to help.  A good number of good samaritans are injured trying to help people.  That was a risk you took to save somebody else.  Just because you don't accept that label doesn't mean that others don't deserve it for doing the same thing.

In my opinion, anyway.

Thanks. I would hope everyone would. It was not a heroic thing. I didn't save anyone from jumping off a bridge. To tell the truth it was craddling a child in my arms and trying to keep her calm. Others were helping the other children and adults. It was a sort of community effort in the end. Good to see.

To end the story no one was majorly hurt. Minor scrapes and bruises. Seat belts are a wonderful thing.

And there was no risk to me in this one. It was well off the road.


If movies have taught me anything, it's that cars explode at a moment's notice once they have a minor accident.  You could have died a fiery death.  Or possibly dodged the fireball, doing a cool ninja landing move.
 
2013-12-22 12:57:26 AM

vicioushobbit: saturn badger: vicioushobbit: FWIW, I would say you were a hero for stopping to help.  A good number of good samaritans are injured trying to help people.  That was a risk you took to save somebody else.  Just because you don't accept that label doesn't mean that others don't deserve it for doing the same thing.

In my opinion, anyway.

Thanks. I would hope everyone would. It was not a heroic thing. I didn't save anyone from jumping off a bridge. To tell the truth it was craddling a child in my arms and trying to keep her calm. Others were helping the other children and adults. It was a sort of community effort in the end. Good to see.

To end the story no one was majorly hurt. Minor scrapes and bruises. Seat belts are a wonderful thing.

And there was no risk to me in this one. It was well off the road.

If movies have taught me anything, it's that cars explode at a moment's notice once they have a minor accident.  You could have died a fiery death.  Or possibly dodged the fireball, doing a cool ninja landing move.


It was fairly major. Two rolls and landing on the roof. I never thought about the explody thing. And my ninja skills are a bit lacking but I like to think the smell of leaking gas would have tuned them up. Then the dilemma starts. Do I try to help or become a dead hero? You just know if I died I would be labeled a hero and then couldn't reject it.

Sometimes death would suck. ;)
 
2013-12-22 01:06:14 AM

saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.


Blow scrod.

jerkoff
 
2013-12-22 01:06:56 AM
That is a really great story.

But am I the only one here that noticed the soldier on the lady's right is really hot?
 
2013-12-22 01:17:25 AM

DrBenway: DrPainMD: DrBenway: DrPainMD: The more we call these guys "heros," the more likely that we'll keep having more wars and more people sent home in body bags. There's hasn't been a challenge to our national sovereignty since the War of 1812. Let's call these guys what they really are: chumps and cannon fodder. The guy was a sucker to throw his life away in a war that had absolutely nothing to do with defending this country.

He began his career in WWII. Was he a chump then, too? Was everyone who died in that war a chump? Show your work.

See the bolded/underlined line, above. If we had stayed out of WW1, WW2 never would have happened. If we hadn't done everything we could to get the Japanese to attack (which, according to the "pre-emptive" strike supporters, was totally defensive [google: flying tigers]), we would have had no excuse to enter WW2. There's nothing defensive about building and maintaining an empire, and politicians don't care how many people die helping them achieve their political/financial ambitions. So, yes, those who fought in WW2 were also chumps.

Mind blown.


Yes, clearly if we had stayed out of WWI, the Versailles Treaty would not have been nearly so vindictive on the Germans, the Bolsheviks would not have overthrown the Czar and abandoned the Eastern Front giving Germany another year in the war, and Lloyd George and Clemenceau would have been much less anxious to avenge battles won and lost before America ever got there.

I should have paid more attention in history, I guess.
 
2013-12-22 01:31:14 AM

blottoman: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

Blow scrod.

jerkoff


Obviously you didn't read the rest of the thread.

Don't worry. I'll wait.
 
2013-12-22 02:30:57 AM
Sadly he died in vain. If we had FINISHED the job, this piece of shiat wouldn't be around.
i.telegraph.co.uk
 
2013-12-22 05:11:09 AM
Looking at the photo above makes me wonder if they have any barber schools in North Korea.
 
2013-12-22 08:01:01 AM

mitoosense: So like...  she's available now?

/You knew some one was going to say it...

Yes, dusty and etc...


Of all the damnable dusty things to say....you damned loveable farker you.....

/dust dust dust
 
2013-12-22 09:04:00 AM

NewportBarGuy: Welcome home, Sarge. Rest In Peace.



And Thank you for your Service.
 
2013-12-22 09:06:26 AM

Gyrfalcon: And just in time for Christmas.

I totally has a sad.


But now she knows where her husband is and knows he is at peace.  She has closure.
 
2013-12-22 09:36:28 AM

saturn badger: blottoman: saturn badger: So someone goes out and does the duty they volunteered for. Then they die. Then they are all heroes.

Whatever.

Blow scrod.

jerkoff

Obviously you didn't read the rest of the thread.

Don't worry. I'll wait.


DRTFA

Just responding to your blanket statement.
 
2013-12-22 12:27:27 PM

Gyrfalcon: DrBenway: DrPainMD: DrBenway: DrPainMD: The more we call these guys "heros," the more likely that we'll keep having more wars and more people sent home in body bags. There's hasn't been a challenge to our national sovereignty since the War of 1812. Let's call these guys what they really are: chumps and cannon fodder. The guy was a sucker to throw his life away in a war that had absolutely nothing to do with defending this country.

He began his career in WWII. Was he a chump then, too? Was everyone who died in that war a chump? Show your work.

See the bolded/underlined line, above. If we had stayed out of WW1, WW2 never would have happened. If we hadn't done everything we could to get the Japanese to attack (which, according to the "pre-emptive" strike supporters, was totally defensive [google: flying tigers]), we would have had no excuse to enter WW2. There's nothing defensive about building and maintaining an empire, and politicians don't care how many people die helping them achieve their political/financial ambitions. So, yes, those who fought in WW2 were also chumps.

Mind blown.

Yes, clearly if we had stayed out of WWI, the Versailles Treaty would not have been nearly so vindictive on the Germans, the Bolsheviks would not have overthrown the Czar and abandoned the Eastern Front giving Germany another year in the war, and Lloyd George and Clemenceau would have been much less anxious to avenge battles won and lost before America ever got there.

I should have paid more attention in history, I guess.



It's the Pat Buchanan school of revisionist historical thought: if we'd only left that poor Mr. Hitler alone, none of the other bad stuff would have happened.
 
HKW
2013-12-22 01:55:29 PM

cameroncrazy1984: Touching story, but would have been nice to know the circumstances of his disappearance.


Simple --  The government forced a man into the military and, since he isnt connected to the powers-in-washington, gets selected for combat duty.   He was placed in proximity of the enemy and things didnt work out in his favor.
 
2013-12-22 09:12:12 PM
OMG, the anguish on that poor lady's face, I skipped the sniffling and went straight to sobbing. It is hurting her just as much as it did the first day am so glad she has him home now.
 
Displayed 80 of 80 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report