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(The New York Observer)   Micro-Apartments could be hazardous to your mental health / sex life   (observer.com) divider line 128
    More: Obvious, Michael Bloomberg, apartments  
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9957 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Dec 2013 at 2:40 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-21 03:27:27 PM
That model apartment is just all kinda of stupid. With that much space, do you really want a tub? Just put a drain in the center of the floor, a slight rise in the doorway, and you could cut the bathroom space in half. As a bonus, when I had a bathroom like that, it took care of most of the cleaning for me as long as I sprayed it down occasionally. Also a four-burner stove is a little excessive. Use induction plates that can be stored away and brought out - it saves lots of counter space. And the little dining table is just ridiculous. Design your desk/work surface and eating table so that they expand together to form a larger eating area if you want to have more than 2 people over.
 
2013-12-21 03:31:43 PM
I live in an RV so I'm really getting a kick out of this thread.  I did the math and I've got well over 300 square feet with the slides out, subtracting the dashboard area.  It's plenty of room for me in the short term.  It'd be a bit small for two people to live full time  It'd be downright cramped for two adults and a couple kids.  That's where you'd have to get into a place where you're converting areas for multiple uses every morning and evening.  Dinette and sofa switching between seating and sleeping roles every day, no privacy of any kind, no room for toys.  But it works perfectly for me while I'm wandering around.

When I'm done wandering, I'll probably buy something in the 800-1200 square foot range.   800's about the smallest I'd want in a permanent home and anything above 1200 would just be a PITA to clean/maintain.  My last house was around 2300 square feet plus a 700 square foot garage and I didn't even use half the rooms.
 
2013-12-21 03:34:27 PM

Contents Under Pressure: The derp in the comments thread is epic. Apparently, a market for small apartments is somehow Obama's fault, fascism, socialism, societal dysfunction, a prison system, and flat out evil.


I guess we've found out where the users from the Yahoo! Finance message boards go when the market is closed for the weekend.
 
2013-12-21 03:34:39 PM

ChicagoKev: I can see the attraction of lower rent and efficient heating+cooling, but I don't understand why anybody would choose a tiny living space over a less cramped floorplan?

With that kind of space, you'd be better off with a houseboat or buy an RV and park at Walmart.   Either would also improve the chances of getting laid compared to a micro-apartment.


Because there is an overabundance of boat slips that are cheap in NYC and the massive number of Walmarts with parking lots is extremely high in number in NYC as well.
 
2013-12-21 03:34:56 PM

MFAWG: RatMaster999: thecpt: MFAWG: thecpt: Ebenator: I hope that bathroom has good ventilation.

The layout they show has zero chase walls for hvac and plumbing. Methinks it was made by marketing and not the engineering dept

There's no need for interior chase walls.

In a high rise? Where the fark would the duct and conduit go?

Floor/ceiling, and connected to a central shaft near the elevators.

Old school tenement style. Hipsters will love it! And then, when we get them all together in these buildings...


OMG, a display exhibit to inform the general public of the trend of microunits wasn't 100% accurate - for example, they didn't even indicate the UL assembly they intend to use for the party walls, nor demonstrate that they meet STC and IIC baselines for multifamily construction.  Look how pedantic I am!!
 
2013-12-21 03:35:50 PM

Surpheon: thecpt: MFAWG: thecpt: MFAWG: thecpt: Ebenator: I hope that bathroom has good ventilation.

The layout they show has zero chase walls for hvac and plumbing. Methinks it was made by marketing and not the engineering dept

There's no need for interior chase walls.

In a high rise? Where the fark would the duct and conduit go?

See the space between the walls of the actual room and the floor plan?

I don't think that's incorporated in the actual design... Did it say that somewhere?

thecpt: Ebenator: I hope that bathroom has good ventilation.

The layout they show has zero chase walls for hvac and plumbing. Methinks it was made by marketing and not the engineering dept

This is a well solved problem. Put a HVAC unit on the exterior wall and have a 6" wetwall behind the toilet.

It's just a hotel room.

/Have done a bit of MEP consulting for a micro apartments bid in NYC


I know but that's not very environmentally friendly...which I thought was somewhat a point of this system.

/working in a LEED high rise in the city now
 
2013-12-21 03:41:40 PM
I imagine all the Navy folks (especially the submariners) would agree that having such a large space to live in, and with so much privacy, would drive you mad.
 
2013-12-21 03:45:48 PM
I spent 2.5 years living with my now ex (ex now not because of this) in a 16 x 20 foot studio which would now fit inside my 17 x 21 foot living room. It was rough. We had to be on the same sleep schedule and if we had a fight the only place to go was the bathroom. It was $450 a month though (one bedrooms were $550 and 2 were $750 at the time there) and the last year we were there we saved up $10k to put down on a house. Had we been in a normal sized apartment, we would have needed another year to save that money for a house.

I could live in a small space again if it was just me, but wouldn't want to otherwise. I always said I had too many books to do it again, but now with Ebooks, the idea is a lot more feasible.
 
2013-12-21 03:48:12 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: I live in 400sf

/with 3 cats
//I wasn't gonna get laid anyway


I live in 450sf with one cat and another person. It wasn't bad for the first four or five years, but now he's working from home and it'd be nice to have a closed door between us when he's on the phones and I'm trying to enjoy a day off.

/the person I live with, not the cat
 
2013-12-21 03:48:15 PM
Looks like a dorm room. Fine for a single person or a loving couple that have no kids. I live in a duplex that has 650 square feet with my wife and daughter. We have no dining room, it is part of the living room, a single bathroom, and only one closet that isn't a bedroom one. Our living room is a pretty efficient layout that holds 2 computer desks, a full couch, TV, 3 bookcases, a recliner (thinking of ditching it since it is broken now), and a comfy chair that is rodent used as a coat rack because of our lack of storage.
 
2013-12-21 03:51:59 PM
My place is smaller than 300 square feet, and I love it.

Then again, I'm an alcoholic loser who plans to never date again., so...there's that.
 
2013-12-21 03:53:32 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-21 03:53:57 PM
Someone needs to tell most of Asia and a lotta Europe that their housing is too small.

/working on a microhome project built on a salvaged construction trailer, getting a kick out of that article NOT.
 
2013-12-21 03:54:17 PM
just because yiu sleep, shiat, shower and shave there doesn't mean you have to stay cooped up all the time
go out.
 
2013-12-21 03:55:45 PM

Relatively Obscure: Scott Hearne: December 21, 2013 at 3:18 am
I think this is ridiculous. I am older and live in a large home but If I was single and wanted to save some money and live in a central location I would Love to live in one of these micro units. Who are these "experts" to say there is something wrong with them? [...] please please government bureaucrats stay out of peoples lives and let them live where they want...even if it's in a small space. It's none of your business.

Jim Carr: December 21, 2013 at 5:13 am
This is exactly what the green enviro wackos want. Cram people like sardines into living spaces too small for real sardines. That leaves the green elites all the room for their multi-thousand square foot mansions. No thank you!

Dennis Farley: December 21, 2013 at 4:48 am
agenda /21.

These comments are fun right out of the gate.


Came here to post this. Those comments made my brain hurt.
 
2013-12-21 03:57:48 PM

Popular Opinion: just because yiu sleep, shiat, shower and shave there doesn't mean you have to stay cooped up all the time
go out.


This. Also, the presumption here seems to be that people never have sex in dorms, hotel rooms, tents, etc...
 
2013-12-21 03:58:10 PM

BigDamn: I imagine all the Navy folks (especially the submariners) would agree that having such a large space to live in, and with so much privacy, would drive you mad.


My husband spent 4 years on a sub in the navy. He is uber claustrophobic now. Says he could never do it again but at the time it didn't bother him.
 
2013-12-21 03:58:21 PM
So, a dorm room then.
Gotcha.
 
2013-12-21 03:59:40 PM

jtown: I live in an RV so I'm really getting a kick out of this thread.  I did the math and I've got well over 300 square feet with the slides out, subtracting the dashboard area.  It's plenty of room for me in the short term.  It'd be a bit small for two people to live full time  It'd be downright cramped for two adults and a couple kids.  That's where you'd have to get into a place where you're converting areas for multiple uses every morning and evening.  Dinette and sofa switching between seating and sleeping roles every day, no privacy of any kind, no room for toys.  But it works perfectly for me while I'm wandering around.

When I'm done wandering, I'll probably buy something in the 800-1200 square foot range.   800's about the smallest I'd want in a permanent home and anything above 1200 would just be a PITA to clean/maintain.  My last house was around 2300 square feet plus a 700 square foot garage and I didn't even use half the rooms.


My in-laws tried that for a while, but lost everything when fil wrecked on the expressway.  Truck, fifth wheel and motorcycle were a complete loss, as only things salvaged was the small trailer used for the bike, his dog and him.  Makes the 'eggs in one basket' adage kind of real.
 
2013-12-21 04:08:08 PM

i39.tinypic.com

 
2013-12-21 04:09:11 PM
Microapartments simply need to be constructed with reliable access to communal spaces. Need to sleep, shower, cook, and use the bathroom there, not idle away hours.
 
2013-12-21 04:11:48 PM

lack of warmth: jtown: I live in an RV so I'm really getting a kick out of this thread.  I did the math and I've got well over 300 square feet with the slides out, subtracting the dashboard area.  It's plenty of room for me in the short term.  It'd be a bit small for two people to live full time  It'd be downright cramped for two adults and a couple kids.  That's where you'd have to get into a place where you're converting areas for multiple uses every morning and evening.  Dinette and sofa switching between seating and sleeping roles every day, no privacy of any kind, no room for toys.  But it works perfectly for me while I'm wandering around.

When I'm done wandering, I'll probably buy something in the 800-1200 square foot range.   800's about the smallest I'd want in a permanent home and anything above 1200 would just be a PITA to clean/maintain.  My last house was around 2300 square feet plus a 700 square foot garage and I didn't even use half the rooms.

My in-laws tried that for a while, but lost everything when fil wrecked on the expressway.  Truck, fifth wheel and motorcycle were a complete loss, as only things salvaged was the small trailer used for the bike, his dog and him.  Makes the 'eggs in one basket' adage kind of real.



Didn't they have insurance beyond basic liability?  If they didn't have proper coverage, that's on them.  You can get coverage as a full-time RVer that's equivalent to home insurance.  Covers contents, visitors, etc.  Don't self-insure if you can't absorb the loss.

And regular houses have auto accidents, too.  My aunt had a car plow into her house recently.  And she's way back from the road on a straight section.  It's not like they missed a turn or slid on ice.
 
2013-12-21 04:20:22 PM

jtown: Didn't they have insurance beyond basic liability?  If they didn't have proper coverage, that's on them.  You can get coverage as a full-time RVer that's equivalent to home insurance.  Covers contents, visitors, etc.  Don't self-insure if you can't absorb the loss.

And regular houses have auto accidents, too.  My aunt had a car plow into her house recently.  And she's way back from the road on a straight section.  It's not like they missed a turn or slid on ice.


They had insurance, but the hassle of replacing everything they owned wasn't worth it anymore for them.  Also, losing all the personal affects that cannot be replaced was hard for my mil.  They got a permanent place after that, but when they went south for a few months during the winter, their home was broken into and trashed.  The break in wasn't as hard on them, because they only had to clean up the place, repair some things and replace some things.  At least the home was still there.
 
2013-12-21 04:33:05 PM

twistedmetal: Still better than your mom's basement.


300 square feet? That much? For thousands of years that would accomodate peasant families of 6 or 7, and the dog and the cow.  And urban apartments were often smaller.

 
2013-12-21 04:34:34 PM
increased claustrophobia, domestic abuse, and alcoholism. ...

Or, people who end up with no options other than a micro apartment have or are predisposed to these conditions due to a lifetime of bad decision making (like deciding to live in NYC for instance).
 
2013-12-21 04:35:01 PM

Haplo127x: That they consider 30 as being "older" tells me a lot about this people and study. My mother lives in a 490 sqft. house and loves it. She's 67. I spent four months in a 150 sqft cabin with my fiance while we were waiting for our house, we had a great time. I think it depends on the person, if you can't amuse yourself in a small space this won't work for you.


Yeah, it seems like a pretty narrow-minded study, I'm 39 and I live in a ~400 sqft apartment with 3 rooms (bathroom, bedroom, "everythingelseroom"). 150 sqft  would be too small I think, but as a temporary measure I could handle it. I think I would be just as happy with a 2-room efficiency similar to the apartment shown in the article.

IMO, these are the two problems and how to fix them...

1.) People have too much stuff. Living in a small apartment necessitates a more spartan lifestyle, but people do like their stuff. Consolidate! Get a wall-mounted TV instead of a TV stand. Use multi-purpose furniture like a headboard with built-in bookshelves. Instead of a couch AND a bed, use a pullout couch.

2.) People spend all their time inside. When your apartment is smaller, it's even more important to spend time outside (even if the "outside time" is spent on a porch or balcony). If I'm going to sit down and read a book, I usually walk to a nearby bar, grab a beer, and sit at their outside tables while I read.

Plus, these apartments are obviously not designed for people with children (and it even says so in the article), making paragraphs 5 and 6 of the article completely pointless.

/I read the bottom half of that page...
//I shouldn't have read the bottom half...
///I know better than to read the bottom half...
 
2013-12-21 04:37:08 PM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: With that much space, do you really want a tub? Just put a drain in the center of the floor, a slight rise in the doorway, and you could cut the bathroom space in half.


I'm going to side with the Japanese on that one. Tubs are important to a lot of people, which is why they are ubiquitous there even in 100 sq.ft. businessman hotel rooms.  That said, I would also want the bath to be 'wet' like you describe, with a floor drain and transom, just to make it easy to clean.
 
2013-12-21 04:38:28 PM
Those of you ratting on the Agenda 21 arguments obviously haven't actually *seen* Agenda 21.

Or been in Northern California north of Sac where they're trying to shove everyone off farms and out of rural areas by making it so expensive to live there. Yet won't let anyone develop on the coast because "omg scenery".

I live in a 384sq ft apartment with my SO and a small dog. It's too damned small, there's no storage space for anything anywhere, and to all you people who say "go out", go WHERE? Gas is expensive here in California, doing anything costs money that we don't have to spend, and sitting on the internet is a heck of a lot more entertaining than associating with the hippy/yuppie hipsters and foodies out here.
 
2013-12-21 04:42:40 PM

minuslars: [nyoobserver.files.wordpress.com image 343x479]

We call this floorplan a "trailer" where I'm from.


Les Nessman is not amused.
 
2013-12-21 04:45:37 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Pokey.Clyde: MaudlinMutantMollusk: I live in 400sf

/with 3 cats
//I wasn't gonna get laid anyway

I bet your place smells great.


It gets aired out pretty frequently

/I know there's worse for sure


New JERSEY!!!
 
2013-12-21 04:52:23 PM
My husband and I live in a 1200sqft house with our 3 kids. If the layout was better we could easily live with 400sqft less. As it is we have a huge play space for the kids, a soundproof recording studio, and all the bedroom closets are completely empty since all our clothing and such fits into the 3ft hallway coat closet. We have a second bath that goes completely unused 95% of the year. How much stuff/space do people really need?
 
2013-12-21 04:58:29 PM

MurphyMurphy: I don't even bother with the apartment anymore.

When my shift is done I put a burlap bag over my head and go to sleep right there at my desk, in my chair.


LoL
 
2013-12-21 05:03:42 PM
Surpheon:
It's just a hotel room.

/Have done a bit of MEP consulting for a micro apartments bid in NYC


Just what we all want; a million, zillion PTAC units sticking out of the building. The architect is going to nuts with the appearance of his building with that. I'm guessing the maintenance is a nightmare because you have to pack half the apartment up when you go to pull one of those units out.
 
2013-12-21 05:04:27 PM

Elfich: Surpheon:
It's just a hotel room.

/Have done a bit of MEP consulting for a micro apartments bid in NYC

Just what we all want; a million, zillion PTAC units sticking out of the building. The architect is going to nuts with the appearance of his building with that. I'm guessing the maintenance is a nightmare because you have to pack half the apartment up when you go to pull one of those units out.


HVAC FIGHT!!
 
2013-12-21 05:06:46 PM
I share a 800 sqft apartment with a platonic friend and a cat, we're respectful and mostly clean so theres no stress. I feel like my room is almost too big, lots of space and few things to fill it with, but I'd rather have room to move around than live cramped. I go out a helluva lot, but when I'm home I wanna be HOME, not in my tiny roomspace that serves 10 functions at once.
 
2013-12-21 05:12:45 PM

Surpheon: thecpt: MFAWG: thecpt: MFAWG: thecpt: Ebenator: I hope that bathroom has good ventilation.

The layout they show has zero chase walls for hvac and plumbing. Methinks it was made by marketing and not the engineering dept

There's no need for interior chase walls.

In a high rise? Where the fark would the duct and conduit go?

See the space between the walls of the actual room and the floor plan?

I don't think that's incorporated in the actual design... Did it say that somewhere?

thecpt: Ebenator: I hope that bathroom has good ventilation.

The layout they show has zero chase walls for hvac and plumbing. Methinks it was made by marketing and not the engineering dept

This is a well solved problem. Put a HVAC unit on the exterior wall and have a 6" wetwall behind the toilet.

It's just a hotel room.

/Have done a bit of MEP consulting for a micro apartments bid in NYC


Putting HVAC units on exterior walls is usually not allowed in large scale apartments in most cities. For one they look ugly and how are you supposed to work on a miniature heat pump 300ft in the air?

The only way I've seen anything like this set up is to have each unit placed directly over other units of the same size. Then you can have a single chase going along next to all of the units in a stack. You pretty much have to use some form of hydronic heat, usually with a chiller and boiler system on the roof. The kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans pretty much have to be vented through a side wall.
 
2013-12-21 05:18:12 PM
My wife and I would kill each other (more probably, she would kill me). You need a little space. No way in hell I would share it with another guy as roomies.
 
2013-12-21 05:21:13 PM

infinitydreamer: My husband and I live in a 1200sqft house with our 3 kids. If the layout was better we could easily live with 400sqft less. As it is we have a huge play space for the kids, a soundproof recording studio, and all the bedroom closets are completely empty since all our clothing and such fits into the 3ft hallway coat closet. We have a second bath that goes completely unused 95% of the year. How much stuff/space do people really need?


While I think these micro-apartment deals are just a way for developers to stuff as many units into a space they legally can, I also hate the whole McMansion on a postage stamp sized lot.

I'd rather have a much smaller house with a fair bit of yard. People completely overestimate their housing needs or have way too much junk. Do don't "have to have" a guest room, that only your Mom uses once a year when she visits.
 
2013-12-21 05:22:34 PM
www.commons-sense.net
 
2013-12-21 05:48:03 PM

soze: Elfich: Surpheon:
It's just a hotel room.

/Have done a bit of MEP consulting for a micro apartments bid in NYC

Just what we all want; a million, zillion PTAC units sticking out of the building. The architect is going to nuts with the appearance of his building with that. I'm guessing the maintenance is a nightmare because you have to pack half the apartment up when you go to pull one of those units out.

HVAC FIGHT!!


Nikola Tesla approves!
 
2013-12-21 06:03:32 PM
I classify this one under "no shiat, Sherlock".  Human beings are not rats.  They don't belong crammed together.  If I had my way there would be a rule that apartments must be a minimum of  1500 sq ft and single family homes a minimum of 2000k with at least 1 acre of land.
 
2013-12-21 06:21:07 PM

armor helix: Surpheon: thecpt: MFAWG: thecpt: MFAWG: thecpt: Ebenator: I hope that bathroom has good ventilation.

The layout they show has zero chase walls for hvac and plumbing. Methinks it was made by marketing and not the engineering dept

There's no need for interior chase walls.

In a high rise? Where the fark would the duct and conduit go?

See the space between the walls of the actual room and the floor plan?

I don't think that's incorporated in the actual design... Did it say that somewhere?

thecpt: Ebenator: I hope that bathroom has good ventilation.

The layout they show has zero chase walls for hvac and plumbing. Methinks it was made by marketing and not the engineering dept

This is a well solved problem. Put a HVAC unit on the exterior wall and have a 6" wetwall behind the toilet.

It's just a hotel room.

/Have done a bit of MEP consulting for a micro apartments bid in NYC

Putting HVAC units on exterior walls is usually not allowed in large scale apartments in most cities. For one they look ugly and how are you supposed to work on a miniature heat pump 300ft in the air?



static4.businessinsider.com
 
2013-12-21 06:21:22 PM

armor helix: Putting HVAC units on exterior walls is usually not allowed in large scale apartments in most cities. For one they look ugly and how are you supposed to work on a miniature heat pump 300ft in the air?


Strictly a code issue. Again, look at the majority of hotels in existence. Or tens of thousands of apartments in NYC. Actually, I've never run into zoning banning HVAC on exterior walls short of historical building regs. PTACs are huge business. And, you know, all the hotels doing it (although good ones do go with hydronic fancoils too).

Access is a non-issue. Stuff breaks, they have to dig it out to get fixed Again, nothing unusual about that. This has been done a hundred thousand times.


For efficiency, I'd probably do a VRF with OSA pulled from under the window. The compressors could go on the roof. Maybe source out a heat exchanger from the Canadian residential market - although with the volumes of OSA you're talking about, that gets to be pretty heavy duty overkill. Could be fun to do triple pane windows and really seal the space up. If you had a shot at eliminating heating entirely, that could pay for an air-to-air heat-x.
 
2013-12-21 06:32:01 PM

minuslars: [nyoobserver.files.wordpress.com image 343x479]

We call this floorplan a "trailer" where I'm from.


Too small, more like an RV. My husband and I lived in an actual mobile home when we were first married up until we had our daughter, then we bought a house. The mobile home was notable for one thing -- an amazing and handy use of every available inch of space. I would think these apartments would be like that, too.
 
2013-12-21 06:32:54 PM
Surpheon:

Strictly a code issue. Again, look at the majority of hotels in existence. Or tens of thousands of apartments in NYC. Actually, I've never run into zoning banning HVAC on exterior walls short of historical building regs. PTACs are huge business. And, you know, all the hotels doing it (although good ones do go with hydronic fancoils too).

Access is a non-issue. Stuff breaks, they have to dig it out to get fixed Again, nothing unusual about that. This has been done a hundred thousand times.


For efficiency, I'd probably do a VRF with OSA pulled from under the window. The compressors could go on the roof. Maybe source out a heat exchanger from the Canadian residential market - although with the volumes of OSA you're talking about, that gets to be pretty heavy duty overkill. Could be fun to do triple pane windows and really seal the space up. If you had a shot at eliminating heating entirely, that could pay for an air-to-air heat-x.


The major issue I have encountered is landlords want individual compressors for each apartment (for utility billing), don't want compressors over bedrooms and everything has to go on the roof (landscaping). The roof real estate gets chewed up pretty quick. Then the walls quickly get congested with refrigerant lines, control, sanitary, storm, cold water (assuming local HW), etc etc etc. Anything above 6 stories would be mad house inside the walls.
 
2013-12-21 06:42:25 PM

gozar_the_destroyer: Looks like a dorm room. Fine for a single person or a loving couple that have no kids. I live in a duplex that has 650 square feet with my wife and daughter. We have no dining room, it is part of the living room, a single bathroom, and only one closet that isn't a bedroom one. Our living room is a pretty efficient layout that holds 2 computer desks, a full couch, TV, 3 bookcases, a recliner (thinking of ditching it since it is broken now), and a comfy chair that is rodent used as a coat rack because of our lack of storage.


I'm assuming you're farking in a mobile fashion of some sort, or do you really have chair that is dedicated to rodent use and a place for coats?
 
2013-12-21 06:55:42 PM

Mandapants: We went from 1700 ft2 to 600+ ft2 last Februrary when we moved out West for work (mine). As I am the primary living-space cleaner, I can say that the tradeoff in having less space to store crap I don't need and having to maintain less space has been completely worth it.

This gives me more time to Fark.


Same here. Went from 2,200 sq ft to 230 sq ft last year. Less to maintain. Cheap living. You just have to manage the space right and you have all you need.
 
2013-12-21 07:18:12 PM
NYC problems, cry me a river.

My noisiest neighbor.

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

My neighbors are a still a bit close.

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2013-12-21 07:35:49 PM

Elfich: Surpheon:
It's just a hotel room.

/Have done a bit of MEP consulting for a micro apartments bid in NYC

Just what we all want; a million, zillion PTAC units sticking out of the building. The architect is going to nuts with the appearance of his building with that. I'm guessing the maintenance is a nightmare because you have to pack half the apartment up when you go to pull one of those units out.


Given the size of the space they manage, a tiny 1-2 cubic foot 1000W 4000 BTU a/c unit would have plenty of power.
 
2013-12-21 07:52:27 PM

doczoidberg: My place is smaller than 300 square feet, and I love it.

Then again, I'm an alcoholic loser who plans to never date again., so...there's that.


Drew should buy a huge building full of these micro-apartments for all the Total Farkers to move into.
 
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