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(Oregon Live)   More and more DEA agents who made careers out of busting up drug operations are now working as financial advisers for people thinking about investing in the legal marijuana industry   (oregonlive.com) divider line 45
    More: Obvious, Drug Enforcement Administration, marijuana legalization, financial adviser, Portland State University, Wisconsin Department of Revenue, 20th state, special agents, industry  
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1918 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Dec 2013 at 8:02 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



45 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-12-20 08:06:28 PM
Who could possibly have more knowledge of running a weed business?
 
2013-12-20 08:07:23 PM
Go where the money is.
 
2013-12-20 08:07:56 PM
So presumably, buying a legal joint will cost three grand?
 
2013-12-20 08:09:27 PM

LordJiro: So presumably, buying a legal joint will cost three grand?


They weigh the dirt.
 
2013-12-20 08:10:08 PM
Cop math, investment broker math, same thing.
 
2013-12-20 08:11:16 PM

LordJiro: So presumably, buying a legal joint will cost three grand?


And that's before tax
 
2013-12-20 08:12:04 PM
"This industry now is about producing and marketing a product and the people who work for the DEA have experience in a different industry, which is arresting and prosecuting people for marijuana," he said.

Isn't this blatantly obvious?

What the hell would DEA agents know about marijuana beyond it being a dangerous gateway drug that is destroying our children and if we catch you with it that's your ass?
 
2013-12-20 08:12:09 PM
Police generally take a dim view of marijuana; the DEA's own "threat assessment" calls it "the most widely available and commonly abused illicit drug in the United States."

Define "abuse".
 
2013-12-20 08:15:03 PM
Glen Frey had it right, almost 30 years ago:

You ask any D.E.A. man,
He'll say There's nothin' we can do,
 
2013-12-20 08:15:08 PM
"Now that people can open up," he said, "I realize this is a product that someone's parents use, someone's friend uses. People that are professional and that have families and that they all view it as an acceptable, better than acceptable, as a better alternative than other options: That was an eye opener."

You mendacious fark. You knew all of this perfectly well while you were an agent but you didn't care. You were being paid six figures to be a government goon.
 
2013-12-20 08:18:41 PM
To build your whole career around fighting drugs only to do a 180 once the penalties are reduced.

How do they not feel like a huge hipocritical douche?
 
2013-12-20 08:25:07 PM

jigger: "Now that people can open up," he said, "I realize this is a product that someone's parents use, someone's friend uses. People that are professional and that have families and that they all view it as an acceptable, better than acceptable, as a better alternative than other options: That was an eye opener."

You mendacious fark. You knew all of this perfectly well while you were an agent but you didn't care. You were being paid six figures to be a government goon.


No Shiat!  Those DUI checkpoints can cause your last drink to cost you $10 grand, rot your liver and beat your wife for you, better to beat up a bag of cheetos and a video game!
 
2013-12-20 08:29:12 PM

scotchcrotch: To build your whole career around fighting drugs only to do a 180 once the penalties are reduced.

How do they not feel like a huge hipocritical douche?


"The answer is simple: Money, dear boy."

-Laurence Olivier
 
2013-12-20 08:34:12 PM
i.imgur.com

Sounds familiar...
 
2013-12-20 08:47:01 PM

jigger: "This industry now is about producing and marketing a product and the people who work for the DEA have experience in a different industry, which is arresting and prosecuting people for marijuana," he said.

Isn't this blatantly obvious?

What the hell would DEA agents know about marijuana beyond it being a dangerous gateway drug that is destroying our children and if we catch you with it that's your ass?


Marketing? Really...it not like it is hard to sell crack marijuana

"Man, how am I gonna sell all this crack weed."

076dd0a50e0c1255009e-bd4b8aabaca29897bc751dfaf75b290c.r40.cf1.rackcdn.com
 
2013-12-20 08:47:55 PM

scotchcrotch: To build your whole career around fighting drugs only to do a 180 once the penalties are reduced.

How do they not feel like a huge hipocritical douche?


I know DAs who become defense attorneys. Johnnie Cochrane was one.
 
2013-12-20 08:53:10 PM

scotchcrotch: To build your whole career around fighting drugs only to do a 180 once the penalties are reduced.

How do they not feel like a huge hipocritical douche?


Or you build your career around understanding the law and at some point a better career emerges in consulting on compliance than enforcement. Do you get this upset if a prosecutor a job as a defense attorney?
 
2013-12-20 08:55:50 PM

Gyrfalcon: scotchcrotch: To build your whole career around fighting drugs only to do a 180 once the penalties are reduced.

How do they not feel like a huge hipocritical douche?

I know DAs who become defense attorneys. Johnnie Cochrane was one.


Damn you beat me. That's what's so funny with all this. So many people are all 'yeah! Now we can stick it to the man and sell our weed all mostly legal!' Meanwhile people who don't give two farks about weed or your natural right to get high are hiring folks like this guy and dumping money into legit businesses that will destroy the folks who use to make big bucks with basement grow ops.
 
2013-12-20 09:00:00 PM
kill em all
 
2013-12-20 09:02:26 PM

NickelP: scotchcrotch: To build your whole career around fighting drugs only to do a 180 once the penalties are reduced.

How do they not feel like a huge hipocritical douche?

Or you build your career around understanding the law and at some point a better career emerges in consulting on compliance than enforcement. Do you get this upset if a prosecutor a job as a defense attorney?


Thats a little different, you're still in the same industry and you recognize the right to counsel.

No one prosecutes a defense attorney for doing their job.

Now if a DA hard on drugs started dealing because it paid better, then yes you are a hipocritical douche.
 
2013-12-20 09:04:08 PM
either that or they are undercover and still working for the feds.
 
2013-12-20 09:06:45 PM

Hyjamon: jigger: "This industry now is about producing and marketing a product and the people who work for the DEA have experience in a different industry, which is arresting and prosecuting people for marijuana," he said.

Isn't this blatantly obvious?

What the hell would DEA agents know about marijuana beyond it being a dangerous gateway drug that is destroying our children and if we catch you with it that's your ass?

Marketing? Really...it not like it is hard to sell crack marijuana

"Man, how am I gonna sell all this crack weed."

[076dd0a50e0c1255009e-bd4b8aabaca29897bc751dfaf75b290c.r40.cf1.rackcd n .com image 468x400]


Marijuana, like alcohol and tobacco, may sell itself, but the key is to get people to buy your marijuana over the other guy's product.  That's why Philip Morris, RJ Reynolds, Beam Inc, Pernod Ricard, etc, spend big bucks for advertising, prominent shelf space, in-store signage and large sales teams to encourage retailers to buy, stock, and promote their products over other brands.

Legalization is going to allow for consolidation of the market.  The growers/distributors who can gain an early edge will be able to invest in buying up or pushing out competitors to gain larger shares of the market.  Marketing and sales play a big role in getting that initial edge.  It doesn't matter how good your product is if no one knows it exists.
 
2013-12-20 09:12:35 PM

jigger: "Now that people can open up," he said, "I realize this is a product that someone's parents use, someone's friend uses. People that are professional and that have families and that they all view it as an acceptable, better than acceptable, as a better alternative than other options: That was an eye opener."

You mendacious fark. You knew all of this perfectly well while you were an agent but you didn't care. You were being paid six figures to be a government goon.


Oh so much this. There are tons of people in LE and security who know damn well that people use it, and many who use it themselves and skate by screening by other methods.

Even in places like Colorado where it's legal, you STILL can be fired from certain contracts, especially government and/or DHS-reviewed sites because of the lingering Federal statutes.

This guy had no problem locking up the same folks that he's now getting paid to support. There needs to be serious and intelligent discussion on this issue by Congress, and repeal this prohibition once and for all.
 
2013-12-20 09:18:10 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-20 09:20:31 PM

houstondragon: serious and intelligent discussion on this any issue by Congress


FTFY
 
2013-12-20 09:22:05 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Hyjamon: jigger: "This industry now is about producing and marketing a product and the people who work for the DEA have experience in a different industry, which is arresting and prosecuting people for marijuana," he said.

Isn't this blatantly obvious?

What the hell would DEA agents know about marijuana beyond it being a dangerous gateway drug that is destroying our children and if we catch you with it that's your ass?

Marketing? Really...it not like it is hard to sell crack marijuana

"Man, how am I gonna sell all this crack weed."

[076dd0a50e0c1255009e-bd4b8aabaca29897bc751dfaf75b290c.r40.cf1.rackcd n .com image 468x400]

Marijuana, like alcohol and tobacco, may sell itself, but the key is to get people to buy your marijuana over the other guy's product.  That's why Philip Morris, RJ Reynolds, Beam Inc, Pernod Ricard, etc, spend big bucks for advertising, prominent shelf space, in-store signage and large sales teams to encourage retailers to buy, stock, and promote their products over other brands.

Legalization is going to allow for consolidation of the market.  The growers/distributors who can gain an early edge will be able to invest in buying up or pushing out competitors to gain larger shares of the market.  Marketing and sales play a big role in getting that initial edge.  It doesn't matter how good your product is if no one knows it exists.


THIS
 
2013-12-20 09:33:41 PM

fusillade762: Police generally take a dim view of marijuana; the DEA's own "threat assessment" calls it "the most widely available and commonly abused illicit drug in the United States."

Define "abuse".


It's illegal in most jurisdictions, therefore any and all usage--no matter how minute--is "abuse".  So sayeth the Lord Most High, Nixon.
 
2013-12-20 09:44:47 PM

Kalashinator: fusillade762: Police generally take a dim view of marijuana; the DEA's own "threat assessment" calls it "the most widely available and commonly abused illicit drug in the United States."

Define "abuse".

It's illegal in most jurisdictions, therefore any and all usage--no matter how minute--is "abuse".  So sayeth the Lord Most High, Nixon.


That is beyond stupid.
Weed is an easy bust due to the smell.
The police should be pursuing dangerous matters.

/legal here
//not a stoner
 
2013-12-20 10:13:16 PM
it's oregon, and it's pretty much legal and/or not frowned upon so already here.  cops retire and become
consultants.  Nothing to see here......  Oregon or the pnw should get its own tag....
 
2013-12-20 10:17:27 PM

NickelP: Damn you beat me. That's what's so funny with all this. So many people are all 'yeah! Now we can stick it to the man and sell our weed all mostly legal!' Meanwhile people who don't give two farks about weed or your natural right to get high are hiring folks like this guy and dumping money into legit businesses that will destroy the folks who use to make big bucks with basement grow ops.


I've done my fair share of clandestine horticulture in the past, but the last people I feel bad for are growers who are going to have to get a real job. Taking the energy out of the sails of crime is why prohibition should be abolished, unfortunately this includes the financial aspirations of sketchy dudes with no marketable skills beyond their green thumb. Get a job hippie. There will always be a farmer's market atmosphere catering to the people who want to avoid mainstream, just like the one's you can already find most weekends.

Legalize everything and watch a lot of crime evaporate. Take away the social stigma associated with admitting a problem and seeking help, and you'll see a lot of barely functioning addicts find a new way to live too.
 
2013-12-20 10:18:03 PM
Fun fact: Eliot Ness died of alcoholism
 
2013-12-20 10:26:46 PM
I think the people that work for the DEA should all get severe chronic pain, and be unable to get their medicine due to the DEA. That would be justice against those bastards.

/somehow they think Prohibition 2 electric boogaloo will work... morons.
 
2013-12-20 10:27:59 PM

jigger: "Now that people can open up," he said, "I realize this is a product that someone's parents use, someone's friend uses. People that are professional and that have families and that they all view it as an acceptable, better than acceptable, as a better alternative than other options: That was an eye opener."

You mendacious fark. You knew all of this perfectly well while you were an agent but you didn't care. You were being paid six figures to be a government goon.


Yeah that is my thought exactly.

"Ya know I thought turning on the Zyklon B was wrong, but everyone was doing it and I got paid well."

Fark em, we should be having trials.
 
2013-12-20 10:34:45 PM

Langdon_777: jigger: "Now that people can open up," he said, "I realize this is a product that someone's parents use, someone's friend uses. People that are professional and that have families and that they all view it as an acceptable, better than acceptable, as a better alternative than other options: That was an eye opener."

You mendacious fark. You knew all of this perfectly well while you were an agent but you didn't care. You were being paid six figures to be a government goon.

Yeah that is my thought exactly.

"Ya know I thought turning on the Zyklon B was wrong, but everyone was doing it and I got paid well."

Fark em, we should be having trials.


Eh, they may be doing it for the money, or may have had an actual change of heart, I don't really care as long as they get to the right side.  Law enforcement (and ex-law enforcement) officers endorsing the pro-legalization stance lends credibility to it in the eyes of the undecided, and winning those people over will be necessary for legalization to spread.

For me pragmatism outweighs any desire of ideological purity.
 
2013-12-20 10:38:27 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Langdon_777: jigger: "Now that people can open up," he said, "I realize this is a product that someone's parents use, someone's friend uses. People that are professional and that have families and that they all view it as an acceptable, better than acceptable, as a better alternative than other options: That was an eye opener."

You mendacious fark. You knew all of this perfectly well while you were an agent but you didn't care. You were being paid six figures to be a government goon.

Yeah that is my thought exactly.

"Ya know I thought turning on the Zyklon B was wrong, but everyone was doing it and I got paid well."

Fark em, we should be having trials.

Eh, they may be doing it for the money, or may have had an actual change of heart, I don't really care as long as they get to the right side.  Law enforcement (and ex-law enforcement) officers endorsing the pro-legalization stance lends credibility to it in the eyes of the undecided, and winning those people over will be necessary for legalization to spread.

For me pragmatism outweighs any desire of ideological purity.


And for me, I think they should all EABOD.  Since all the people they busted lost everything, I think these guys can get the very same.  Vindictive?  Yea.  So sue me.

I'll make sure and out anyone I discover coming from the prohibitionists into the business, and I'll do everything in my power to run 'em out of town...on a rail...time for shaming of the real criminals.
 
2013-12-20 11:15:10 PM
I wouldn't hire him. I'd tell him "You prevented this kind of business for years and now you want a job in it? Sorry, I don't have any openings for floor sweepers."
 
2013-12-20 11:24:05 PM
Reporter: Excuse me Mr. Ness but what are you gonna do now that Prohibition is over?

Mr. Ness: I think I'll have a drink!

I expect nothing less from law enforcement than hypocrisy
 
2013-12-21 12:16:11 AM
You guys are acting like the cops themselves wrote and enacted the laws that they enforced. Do you feel the same way about, say, hackers who got busted and then went on to make a fortune as "security consultants" for the same agencies they were hacking before their arrests? "You righteous hypocrites, how dare you make a living at crime and now get rich telling them how to avoid criminals!"

It's all a job. Their job is to arrest criminals. The laws change, and now the criminals are no longer criminals. It's not like the cops particularly care if a hippie was a good guy or a bad guy--the cop's job was to catch lawbreakers. Now he is no longer a law breaker, and the cop has unique knowledge of how grow operations work. Is it HIS fault his previous job required him to enforce the law? I'm not sure why people have this idea that cops are the ones who invent the laws and require them to be enforced--they're just the enforcers. If you don't like the laws they enforce, you need to look beyond the enforcers to the ones who hire them, and the ones who invent the laws. Those are ultimately the ones who deserve your ire.
 
2013-12-21 12:35:43 AM
So, either these guys had a massive change of heart or they're farking sociopaths.

Probably 6 of one and half a dozen of the other.
 
2013-12-21 01:16:35 AM

sleeper2995: Reporter: Excuse me Mr. Ness but what are you gonna do now that Prohibition is over?

Mr. Ness: I think I'll have a drink!

I expect nothing less from law enforcement than hypocrisy


That's why they want to be known as "law enforcement officers".  That's why no one should trust the police: they don't give a shiat about how just a law is, they're just there to enforce it.

"Protect and serve" my left foot.
 
2013-12-21 05:14:59 AM
This is like those companies that sold both radar guns and radar detectors. Or Walgreens that sells cancer sticks up front and cancer drugs in the back.
 
2013-12-21 06:26:37 AM
Sometimes you don't need a weatherman to tell you which way the wind blows.
 
2013-12-21 07:06:20 AM

Gyrfalcon: You guys are acting like the cops themselves wrote and enacted the laws that they enforced. Do you feel the same way about, say, hackers who got busted and then went on to make a fortune as "security consultants" for the same agencies they were hacking before their arrests? "You righteous hypocrites, how dare you make a living at crime and now get rich telling them how to avoid criminals!"

It's all a job. Their job is to arrest criminals. The laws change, and now the criminals are no longer criminals. It's not like the cops particularly care if a hippie was a good guy or a bad guy--the cop's job was to catch lawbreakers. Now he is no longer a law breaker, and the cop has unique knowledge of how grow operations work. Is it HIS fault his previous job required him to enforce the law? I'm not sure why people have this idea that cops are the ones who invent the laws and require them to be enforced--they're just the enforcers. If you don't like the laws they enforce, you need to look beyond the enforcers to the ones who hire them, and the ones who invent the laws. Those are ultimately the ones who deserve your ire.


I largely agree with you, but I think some people would argue that someone who knows the law is bad has no business joining the DEA, and that leads us to...

adamatari: So, either these guys had a massive change of heart or they're farking sociopaths.

Probably 6 of one and half a dozen of the other.


...an awful lot of people equate legality with morality, a connection that is clearly not true. I'm not sure how people develop that conception, but in my extended family, it seems as if the eldest child is more susceptible to thinking that way.

One summer at UVA I was taking an econ course and in the class immediately before mine they were teaching some kind of civics for jocks course. I was waiting for their class to end and heard the professor talking about how law != morality. When she dismissed the class, I went in to talk to her about that, being interested that it was being explicitly discussed. In her experience, the vast majority of her students equated the two at least on a level where they expected that was the right answer because when she'd ask how many people thought law and morality were the same, almost all her students would raise their hands (and not just in that civics for jocks class).

I'm betting that for most people who join the SS DEA, it doesn't even occur to them that what's going on is wrong.
 
2013-12-21 09:42:07 AM

Gyrfalcon: You guys are acting like the cops themselves wrote and enacted the laws that they enforced. Do you feel the same way about, say, hackers who got busted and then went on to make a fortune as "security consultants" for the same agencies they were hacking before their arrests? "You righteous hypocrites, how dare you make a living at crime and now get rich telling them how to avoid criminals!"

It's all a job. Their job is to arrest criminals. The laws change, and now the criminals are no longer criminals. It's not like the cops particularly care if a hippie was a good guy or a bad guy--the cop's job was to catch lawbreakers. Now he is no longer a law breaker, and the cop has unique knowledge of how grow operations work. Is it HIS fault his previous job required him to enforce the law? I'm not sure why people have this idea that cops are the ones who invent the laws and require them to be enforced--they're just the enforcers. If you don't like the laws they enforce, you need to look beyond the enforcers to the ones who hire them, and the ones who invent the laws. Those are ultimately the ones who deserve your ire.


Police have a choice about what laws they enforce. Many laws are so idiotic and outdated that they never get enforced, which was the reason the anti-sodomy laws in many states never really got much attention until some police actually enforced it resulting in people learning it was actually a law that existed.

Given how often police ignore random crimes taking place like littering or various traffic violations as well as how routine it is for them to avoid actual crime ridden areas (since they're dangerous) in favor of sitting in nice comfortable and safe ones, it seems kinda silly to carry on as though these are people that take on some job of seriously seeking out anyone that breaks a law. Their only aim is to get paid, which involves doing just enough to get by, and normally involves trying to avoid any dangerous situation and going after the tamest of criminals.
 
2013-12-21 01:23:24 PM

Gyrfalcon: You guys are acting like the cops themselves wrote and enacted the laws that they enforced. Do you feel the same way about, say, hackers who got busted and then went on to make a fortune as "security consultants" for the same agencies they were hacking before their arrests? "You righteous hypocrites, how dare you make a living at crime and now get rich telling them how to avoid criminals!"

It's all a job. Their job is to arrest criminals. The laws change, and now the criminals are no longer criminals. It's not like the cops particularly care if a hippie was a good guy or a bad guy--the cop's job was to catch lawbreakers. Now he is no longer a law breaker, and the cop has unique knowledge of how grow operations work. Is it HIS fault his previous job required him to enforce the law? I'm not sure why people have this idea that cops are the ones who invent the laws and require them to be enforced--they're just the enforcers. If you don't like the laws they enforce, you need to look beyond the enforcers to the ones who hire them, and the ones who invent the laws. Those are ultimately the ones who deserve your ire.


Everytime someone decides to become a cop that enforces stupid laws. That routinly ruins peoples lives over nonsense.
Then yes it is his fault. The legal industry should do everything it can to run these assholes out of the weed business. Cops never supported it before. Fark them for wanting to jump on the bandwagon now. They should be run out of town on the horse they rode in on.
 
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