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(Slate)   How astronauts took the most important space photo in history   (slate.com) divider line 11
    More: Cool, Earthrise, Jim Lovell, astronauts, first humans, Death from the Skies, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Bad Astronomy, Phil Plait  
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5981 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Dec 2013 at 2:52 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-20 03:25:30 PM  
4 votes:
In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.

"... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance."

"We spend the first year of a child's life teaching it to walk and talk and the rest of its life to shut up and sit down. There's something wrong there."

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."

"We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically."

"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

"I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up-many people feel small, because they're small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars."

"Kids are never the problem. They are born scientists. The problem is always the adults. They beat the curiosity out of kids. They outnumber kids. They vote. They wield resources. That's why my public focus is primarily adults."

"For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you."

upload.wikimedia.org

This man is a national treasure.
2013-12-20 09:37:32 PM  
1 votes:
Culturally, Pale Blue Dot is important, and Hubble Deep Field less so but still up there, but the color picture of Earth from the Moon is the one that is stamped across an entire generation. A good proxy for figuring out which one has been more iconic is to look at which photograph has been stamped across more book covers. It's a crude measure, but if you're skeptical it's about the only thing I can think of that would convince you about something that is pretty subjective.

When I talk to people of my father's generation, or my grandfather's generation, it's that image (and that of Armstrong touching ground on the Moon) that inspired them or shook up their ideas of what the universe was like. My grandfather grew up only dimly realizing that there was a whole big universe. Seeing people walk on the Moon, and seeing Earth through the eyes of people who had walked there, changed the way many people thought. It's a gripping realization that Earth is there and real and surrounded by the void of space, and also "Look at what we can do."

Historians don't credit "Pale Blue Dot" with a substantial influence on the modern Green and ecological movements, for instance. You do find the Earthrise iconography all over the '70s ecological propaganda, though. It's not a coincidence that a viscerally moving image of the world we live in would have an impact on the thought processes of a generation.

What morons like QA will never understand (in addition to the value of a 3D printer in space, which LOWERS THE COST OF SUPPLYING SPARE PARTS YOU DIPshiat) is the value of showing people while they should value, with a cultural/memetic tag of "a person was here." As a species, we're wired for a certain level of empathy, and something that carries with it the knowledge or the belief that a human was present and experienced what you're experiencing through film will be more powerful than something that was merely produced and manipulated by a robot. The orange-studded pictures of Titan make me excited, but it's nothing compared to being confronted with the reality of Earth in the Solar System in the Orion Arm in the Milky Way in the Local Group in the Universe.
2013-12-20 05:11:26 PM  
1 votes:
DUN DUN DUNNNNNNNN


1.bp.blogspot.com

DUN DUNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN!!! BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM!
2013-12-20 04:51:02 PM  
1 votes:
Hyperbole much?  The most important space photo in history?  That's what they said about the pale blue dot and the Hubble deep space and probably 1/2 dozen more photos along the way.  Yes it's cool and yes it's iconic but most important is a tall order and pretty subjective.

/but otherwise I enjoy Phil's work
2013-12-20 04:30:53 PM  
1 votes:
I would imagine they used a camera, pointed it at the scene they wished to capture, and pressed the "take picture" button.
2013-12-20 04:19:17 PM  
1 votes:
I see QA's here bashing his former religion again. Nothing quite like the bitterness of someone let down by his own unrealistic dreams.
2013-12-20 04:04:01 PM  
1 votes:
This is the most important space picture:

lh3.ggpht.com

http://jostamon.blogspot.ca/2011/01/sun-is-star.html

You goofballs probably don't even know people thought the Galaxy was the universe up until about the late 1920s. We all figured this shiat out without going anywhere.

http://cosmology.carnegiescience.edu/timeline/1929

You adolescent freaks are confusing the race car driver with the scientists who came up with the Carnot cycle behind the engines.

Then worshiping the driver under the guise of "science". You morons don't give a crap about science or reality, you just want your jollies. "Exploring" something that's mostly a vacuum. Sheez.

"But but but I'll be 0.0000000000001% closer and it's VITAL that *I* press the button on the camera!"
2013-12-20 03:27:31 PM  
1 votes:

ltdanman44: In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.

"... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance."

"We spend the first year of a child's life teaching it to walk and talk and the rest of its life to shut up and sit down. There's something wrong there."

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."

"We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically."

"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

"I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up-many people feel small, because they're small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars."

"Kids are never the problem. They are born scientists. The problem is always the adults. They beat the curiosity out of kids. They outnumber kids. They vote. They wield resources. That's why my public focus is primarily adults."

"For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you."

[upload.wikimedia.org image 437x468]

This man is a national treasure.


This.  I cannot stress enough....THIS
2013-12-20 03:27:14 PM  
1 votes:

bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?


A color picture, taken by an actual human floating in a tin can, of a recognizable Earth hovering over the bleak landscape of its satellite? Yeah, that's a bit more visceral that the others.
2013-12-20 03:18:50 PM  
1 votes:
Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

pbs.twimg.com

foxnomad.com
2013-12-20 02:13:57 PM  
1 votes:
25.media.tumblr.com
With this.
 
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