If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   How astronauts took the most important space photo in history   (slate.com) divider line 49
    More: Cool, Earthrise, Jim Lovell, astronauts, first humans, Death from the Skies, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Bad Astronomy, Phil Plait  
•       •       •

5977 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Dec 2013 at 2:52 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-12-20 02:13:57 PM
25.media.tumblr.com
With this.
 
2013-12-20 02:38:52 PM
Scarlet Johanson's topless selfie?
 
2013-12-20 02:45:46 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-20 03:01:36 PM
"most important" or "most iconic"?????? We already knew what the Earth looked like, Phil.
 
2013-12-20 03:04:49 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: "most important" or "most iconic"?????? We already knew what the Earth looked like, Phil.


And I'm sure you'd be perfectly happy never sending another item into space, right?
 
2013-12-20 03:08:33 PM
cameras work just fine on a sound stage.
 
2013-12-20 03:09:03 PM

skinbubble: [1.bp.blogspot.com image 301x300]


the photo in the article is an obvious fake, half of the earth is missing!
 
2013-12-20 03:10:59 PM
imageshack.us
 
2013-12-20 03:11:34 PM

A Cave Geek: Quantum Apostrophe: "most important" or "most iconic"?????? We already knew what the Earth looked like, Phil.

And I'm sure you'd be perfectly happy never sending another item into space, right?


Why would you think that? Space is a great place to put satellites and the occasional camera in a tin can. It's like caves, plenty of fun to visit, I just don't think the species will colonize them.

You telling me only a person could have taken that picture?
 
2013-12-20 03:13:43 PM
While on an ETA Michael Collins lost a Hasselblad in orbit. He later claimed he had taken some of the greatest pictures ever, and laughed.
 
2013-12-20 03:15:30 PM
I heard an interview with one of the astronauts who said the only thing that bothered him about the picture was that it was sideways. When he saw the Earthrise, fom his perspective, the moon wasn't below him, it was to the right.

I thought that summed up the concept of "up" and "down" in space really well.
 
2013-12-20 03:16:11 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: A Cave Geek: Quantum Apostrophe: "most important" or "most iconic"?????? We already knew what the Earth looked like, Phil.

And I'm sure you'd be perfectly happy never sending another item into space, right?

Why would you think that? Space is a great place to put satellites and the occasional camera in a tin can. It's like caves, plenty of fun to visit, I just don't think the species will colonize them.

You telling me only a person could have taken that picture?


You telling me you think a machine did?
 
2013-12-20 03:18:50 PM
Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

pbs.twimg.com

foxnomad.com
 
2013-12-20 03:25:30 PM
In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.

"... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance."

"We spend the first year of a child's life teaching it to walk and talk and the rest of its life to shut up and sit down. There's something wrong there."

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."

"We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically."

"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

"I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up-many people feel small, because they're small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars."

"Kids are never the problem. They are born scientists. The problem is always the adults. They beat the curiosity out of kids. They outnumber kids. They vote. They wield resources. That's why my public focus is primarily adults."

"For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you."

upload.wikimedia.org

This man is a national treasure.
 
2013-12-20 03:27:14 PM

bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?


A color picture, taken by an actual human floating in a tin can, of a recognizable Earth hovering over the bleak landscape of its satellite? Yeah, that's a bit more visceral that the others.
 
2013-12-20 03:27:31 PM

ltdanman44: In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.

"... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance."

"We spend the first year of a child's life teaching it to walk and talk and the rest of its life to shut up and sit down. There's something wrong there."

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."

"We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically."

"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

"I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up-many people feel small, because they're small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars."

"Kids are never the problem. They are born scientists. The problem is always the adults. They beat the curiosity out of kids. They outnumber kids. They vote. They wield resources. That's why my public focus is primarily adults."

"For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you."

[upload.wikimedia.org image 437x468]

This man is a national treasure.


This.  I cannot stress enough....THIS
 
2013-12-20 03:34:59 PM
Love that "behind the scenes" stuff. Thanks, subby.
 
2013-12-20 03:39:25 PM

A Cave Geek: ltdanman44: In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.

"... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance."

"We spend the first year of a child's life teaching it to walk and talk and the rest of its life to shut up and sit down. There's something wrong there."

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."

"We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically."

"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

"I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up-many people feel small, because they're small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars."

"Kids are never the problem. They are born scientists. The problem is always the adults. They beat the curiosity out of kids. They outnumber kids. They vote. They wield resources. That's why my public focus is primarily adults."

"For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you."

[upload.wikimedia.org image 437x468]

This man is a national treasure.

This.  I cannot stress en ...


1-media-cdn.foolz.us
 
2013-12-20 03:51:18 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: A Cave Geek: Quantum Apostrophe: "most important" or "most iconic"?????? We already knew what the Earth looked like, Phil.

And I'm sure you'd be perfectly happy never sending another item into space, right?

Why would you think that? Space is a great place to put satellites and the occasional camera in a tin can. It's like caves, plenty of fun to visit, I just don't think the species will colonize them.

You telling me only a person could have taken that picture?


The children were right to laugh at you, Ralph.
 
2013-12-20 03:53:10 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: A Cave Geek: Quantum Apostrophe: "most important" or "most iconic"?????? We already knew what the Earth looked like, Phil.

And I'm sure you'd be perfectly happy never sending another item into space, right?

Why would you think that? Space is a great place to put satellites and the occasional camera in a tin can. It's like caves, plenty of fun to visit, I just don't think the species will colonize them.

You telling me only a person could have taken that picture?


A PERSON taking that picture is what has made it amazing, It is what made it special.

Go troll some place else.
 
2013-12-20 03:56:31 PM

A Cave Geek: Quantum Apostrophe: A Cave Geek: Quantum Apostrophe: "most important" or "most iconic"?????? We already knew what the Earth looked like, Phil.

And I'm sure you'd be perfectly happy never sending another item into space, right?

Why would you think that? Space is a great place to put satellites and the occasional camera in a tin can. It's like caves, plenty of fun to visit, I just don't think the species will colonize them.

You telling me only a person could have taken that picture?

You telling me you think a machine did?


I see. So because someone walked to another city, inventing cars is bad.

BTW, do you think he painted those pictures or a camera took em? Why do you need a fragile and squishy monkey on the shutter again???

Merry Space Christmas BTW! Even with your intellectually dishonest and specious arguments!

Ho! Ho! Ho!

Merry Cave Colonizing!!!

On Armstrong! On Aldrin! Gagarin! Laika! Tereshkova! Onwards Grissom and Collins!

Space is a giant Wal Mart full of gifts for us!!!

Ho! Ho! Hooo!!!!!

ltdanman44: In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.


Mmmm, no? We seem to be exploring it just fine from right here. Like we always did? These scientists you keep talking about? They all discovered about space from right here! No test pilots in tin cans required.

You seem to, on purpose, mix and match science with your desire for a giant rollercoaster ride.

"I went on a big rocket into LEO!! But I did it for the species!"

Like, only space can advance science?

Your religion is showing.
 
2013-12-20 03:58:40 PM

bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

[pbs.twimg.com image 825x643]

[foxnomad.com image 690x366]


The idea, I believe, is that it's more difficult to put a human in the position to take such a photograph than it is a machine.

/not subby
 
2013-12-20 04:03:57 PM

Gonz: I heard an interview with one of the astronauts who said the only thing that bothered him about the picture was that it was sideways. When he saw the Earthrise, fom his perspective, the moon wasn't below him, it was to the right.

I thought that summed up the concept of "up" and "down" in space really well.


Something would just look bizarre with the moon on the right and the earth on the left.  Like you were taking pictures of mountains out of the window of a train.
 
2013-12-20 04:04:01 PM
This is the most important space picture:

lh3.ggpht.com

http://jostamon.blogspot.ca/2011/01/sun-is-star.html

You goofballs probably don't even know people thought the Galaxy was the universe up until about the late 1920s. We all figured this shiat out without going anywhere.

http://cosmology.carnegiescience.edu/timeline/1929

You adolescent freaks are confusing the race car driver with the scientists who came up with the Carnot cycle behind the engines.

Then worshiping the driver under the guise of "science". You morons don't give a crap about science or reality, you just want your jollies. "Exploring" something that's mostly a vacuum. Sheez.

"But but but I'll be 0.0000000000001% closer and it's VITAL that *I* press the button on the camera!"
 
2013-12-20 04:09:42 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: You seem to, on purpose, mix and match science with your desire for a giant rollercoaster ride.


Absolutely not.  Some of our greatest scientific advances have come from space exploration and experiments.  I truly believe there is so much more for us to find, I just hope it happens in my lifetime.  I want to be a part of it.  I want to be around for the next major breakthrough in science.

Wanting the human race to figure out the universe is not being selfish.  It is the adventurer in me that hopes tomorrow is the day we discover something really special.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASA_spin-off_technologies
 
2013-12-20 04:19:17 PM
I see QA's here bashing his former religion again. Nothing quite like the bitterness of someone let down by his own unrealistic dreams.
 
2013-12-20 04:30:53 PM
I would imagine they used a camera, pointed it at the scene they wished to capture, and pressed the "take picture" button.
 
2013-12-20 04:51:02 PM
Hyperbole much?  The most important space photo in history?  That's what they said about the pale blue dot and the Hubble deep space and probably 1/2 dozen more photos along the way.  Yes it's cool and yes it's iconic but most important is a tall order and pretty subjective.

/but otherwise I enjoy Phil's work
 
2013-12-20 05:11:26 PM
DUN DUN DUNNNNNNNN


1.bp.blogspot.com

DUN DUNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN!!! BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM BUM!
 
2013-12-20 05:40:37 PM
oh Quanto, don't worry. Nobody will remember you. When we are mining the asteroids, when we occupy a Moon colony, when we are in orbit over Mars, there will be no monument to Quanto, anywhere. Your bones will lie forgotten and cold in the grave.

You will have been wrong, and forgotten.
There, happy now?

images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-12-20 06:23:34 PM

FTA:

There will be many, many more like it.

Not in your lifetime or that of your child's
 
2013-12-20 06:26:38 PM

ltdanman44
tyson.jpg

This man is a national treasure.

As I've said before, I'm glad he's out there as we (the USA) desperately need someone pushing science. I just wish he'd stop stealing Sagan's material as his own.

He's the carlos mencia of science.
 
2013-12-20 06:48:24 PM

OnlyM3: FTA:
There will be many, many more like it.
Not in your lifetime or that of your child's


Yes there will, I'm Chinese.
 
2013-12-20 06:49:11 PM

ltdanman44: In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.

"... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance."

"We spend the first year of a child's life teaching it to walk and talk and the rest of its life to shut up and sit down. There's something wrong there."

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."

"We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically."

"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

"I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up-many people feel small, because they're small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars."

"Kids are never the problem. They are born scientists. The problem is always the adults. They beat the curiosity out of kids. They outnumber kids. They vote. They wield resources. That's why my public focus is primarily adults."

"For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you."

[upload.wikimedia.org image 437x468]

This man is a national treasure.


I loved his '80's smash hit, 'Somebody's Watching Me'. I had no idea he knew so much about the universe.
 
2013-12-20 08:25:07 PM

Gonz: I heard an interview with one of the astronauts who said the only thing that bothered him about the picture was that it was sideways. When he saw the Earthrise, fom his perspective, the moon wasn't below him, it was to the right.

I thought that summed up the concept of "up" and "down" in space really well.


The enemy's gate is down. I mean, home planet, sorry.
 
2013-12-20 08:50:39 PM

theorellior: bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

A color picture, taken by an actual human floating in a tin can, of a recognizable Earth hovering over the bleak landscape of its satellite? Yeah, that's a bit more visceral that the others.


I disagree, the event of humans around the moon for the first time is significant. The Picture it self being taken by robots or humans isn't.
 
2013-12-20 09:19:25 PM

bbfreak: theorellior: bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

A color picture, taken by an actual human floating in a tin can, of a recognizable Earth hovering over the bleak landscape of its satellite? Yeah, that's a bit more visceral that the others.

I disagree, the event of humans around the moon for the first time is significant. The Picture it self being taken by robots or humans isn't.


And I will say that the fact that a HUMAN took the picture, in real time, while actually THERE is rather significant.
 
2013-12-20 09:37:32 PM
Culturally, Pale Blue Dot is important, and Hubble Deep Field less so but still up there, but the color picture of Earth from the Moon is the one that is stamped across an entire generation. A good proxy for figuring out which one has been more iconic is to look at which photograph has been stamped across more book covers. It's a crude measure, but if you're skeptical it's about the only thing I can think of that would convince you about something that is pretty subjective.

When I talk to people of my father's generation, or my grandfather's generation, it's that image (and that of Armstrong touching ground on the Moon) that inspired them or shook up their ideas of what the universe was like. My grandfather grew up only dimly realizing that there was a whole big universe. Seeing people walk on the Moon, and seeing Earth through the eyes of people who had walked there, changed the way many people thought. It's a gripping realization that Earth is there and real and surrounded by the void of space, and also "Look at what we can do."

Historians don't credit "Pale Blue Dot" with a substantial influence on the modern Green and ecological movements, for instance. You do find the Earthrise iconography all over the '70s ecological propaganda, though. It's not a coincidence that a viscerally moving image of the world we live in would have an impact on the thought processes of a generation.

What morons like QA will never understand (in addition to the value of a 3D printer in space, which LOWERS THE COST OF SUPPLYING SPARE PARTS YOU DIPshiat) is the value of showing people while they should value, with a cultural/memetic tag of "a person was here." As a species, we're wired for a certain level of empathy, and something that carries with it the knowledge or the belief that a human was present and experienced what you're experiencing through film will be more powerful than something that was merely produced and manipulated by a robot. The orange-studded pictures of Titan make me excited, but it's nothing compared to being confronted with the reality of Earth in the Solar System in the Orion Arm in the Milky Way in the Local Group in the Universe.
 
2013-12-20 09:50:49 PM
As for space exploration with robots:

While for broad planetary surveys robots are perfectly fine, robotics technology is nowhere near advanced enough for many, possibly most, scientific goals. First, any instruction to a robot to adjust its course of action must obey the speed of light. Across interplanetary distances, it builds up. Lots and lots of time is wasted just sending and receiving instructions. Second, wheels are fine but not great for traversing difficult ground. Many of the most interesting scientific surveys need to be conducted at locations where strata are disrupted - in other words, difficult ground. Third, human beings aren't that great at comprehending all the visual information they're confronted with unless it's in real time and close by. If you want to have human knowledge, reasoning, and intuition applied, you really need someone there. Fourth, no robot within a feasible technological horizon is as capable of self-repair as a human being. A lot of time and energy is expended on making robots fault-proof, and sometimes if a single bit is wrong the whole thing collapses. Fifth, assuming you can solve the other problems, artificial intelligence is nowhere near capable of handling independent scientific investigation on its own, and I'm not sure I want to live in a post-singularity world where that would be possible.

It's adding up all of those advantages that makes human beings on a cost/performance basis ideal for many kinds of scientific inquiry. That's entirely leaving out the human spirit of inquiry, discovery, and exploration - traits that make being a human worth living, and I question the humanity of people who would sacrifice that on the throne of the altar of some frankly unhinged rant about "immortal atoms" (which aren't immortal; proton decay will occur at some point or another).
 
2013-12-20 10:17:11 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: This is the most important space picture:

[lh3.ggpht.com image 640x359]

http://jostamon.blogspot.ca/2011/01/sun-is-star.html

You goofballs probably don't even know people thought the Galaxy was the universe up until about the late 1920s. We all figured this shiat out without going anywhere.

http://cosmology.carnegiescience.edu/timeline/1929

You adolescent freaks are confusing the race car driver with the scientists who came up with the Carnot cycle behind the engines.

Then worshiping the driver under the guise of "science". You morons don't give a crap about science or reality, you just want your jollies. "Exploring" something that's mostly a vacuum. Sheez.

"But but but I'll be 0.0000000000001% closer and it's VITAL that *I* press the button on the camera!"


Tell us about the Hubble and Kepler Telescopes, QA. Tell us how those satellites could be replaced by Earth-bound observatories.

Stick to biatching about the realism of Star Trek, and being a general asshole to everyone. You're better at it.
 
2013-12-20 10:50:54 PM

ltdanman44: In the years since, we have lost our way with space exploration.

"... there is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance."

"We spend the first year of a child's life teaching it to walk and talk and the rest of its life to shut up and sit down. There's something wrong there."

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."

"We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically."

"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

"I look up at the night sky, and I know that, yes, we are part of this Universe, we are in this Universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up-many people feel small, because they're small and the Universe is big, but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars."

"Kids are never the problem. They are born scientists. The problem is always the adults. They beat the curiosity out of kids. They outnumber kids. They vote. They wield resources. That's why my public focus is primarily adults."

"For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you."

[upload.wikimedia.org image 437x468]

This man is a national treasure.


I knew it was just a matter of time before the fellatio of this guy would begin.
 
2013-12-20 11:40:33 PM
Quantum Apostrophe [TotalFark]

(favorite: 8010186 Said nothing was "up there" to slow a satellite when the link said it was in the atmosphere.)


You adolescent freaks are confusing the race car driver with the scientists who...

Please tell us more about science. What does that science stuff tell us about atmosphere and drag?
 
2013-12-21 01:05:50 AM
I've been thinking all day where I just saw that picture. The answer was on my coffee table for the past few years.

img1.targetimg1.com
 
2013-12-21 08:00:36 AM

bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

[pbs.twimg.com image 825x643]

[foxnomad.com image 690x366]


Space photography snobs on MY Fark?
 
2013-12-21 01:49:17 PM

ltdanman44: Quantum Apostrophe: You seem to, on purpose, mix and match science with your desire for a giant rollercoaster ride.

Absolutely not.  Some of our greatest scientific advances have come from space exploration and experiments.  I truly believe there is so much more for us to find, I just hope it happens in my lifetime.  I want to be a part of it.  I want to be around for the next major breakthrough in science.

Wanting the human race to figure out the universe is not being selfish.  It is the adventurer in me that hopes tomorrow is the day we discover something really special.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASA_spin-off_technologies


Don't mind him. To QA, people saying "Hey, it'd be cool if one day we have the technology to explore space," is exactly the same as "OMG SPACE IS TOTES COOL AND SAFE LET'S GO NOW!"
 
2013-12-21 06:02:49 PM

bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

[pbs.twimg.com image 825x643]

[foxnomad.com image 690x366]


I'd have gone with a spectrographic plate that demonstrated red shift to Edwin Hubble, but his conclusions came from a great many plates...

Or perhaps Cepheid variables and the plates used to discover them.

The first gave us an idea of the distance to distant galaxies, and the second provided the yardstick to measure the distance to nearer ones.
 
2013-12-21 06:28:51 PM

AndreMA: bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

[pbs.twimg.com image 825x643]

[foxnomad.com image 690x366]

I'd have gone with a spectrographic plate that demonstrated red shift to Edwin Hubble, but his conclusions came from a great many plates...

Or perhaps Cepheid variables and the plates used to discover them.

The first gave us an idea of the distance to distant galaxies, and the second provided the yardstick to measure the distance to nearer ones.


Those are good choices too. I just think its a bit pretentious of Subby to say its the most important space picture ever. One of the most iconic, yes,  but the most important? You could argue over that until the cows come home. One that comes to mind, how is this more important than the picture of Buzz Aldrin on the moon that is just as iconic? Not only was that a harder picture to take, since they had to land on the freaking moon but it has an actual human in the shot on the surface of another world.

Or this one of Eugene Cernan on the freaking moon with the earth above him?

ep.yimg.com

Or this one with geologist Harrison Schmitt, old glory, and the earth above it?

ep.yimg.com
 
2013-12-21 08:07:29 PM

bbfreak: AndreMA: bbfreak: Really subby? The most important space photo in history is the Apollo 8 earthrise picture? What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8? Or Voyager 1's picture of earth from 6 billion km away. Or Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field?

[pbs.twimg.com image 825x643]

[foxnomad.com image 690x366]

I'd have gone with a spectrographic plate that demonstrated red shift to Edwin Hubble, but his conclusions came from a great many plates...

Or perhaps Cepheid variables and the plates used to discover them.

The first gave us an idea of the distance to distant galaxies, and the second provided the yardstick to measure the distance to nearer ones.

Those are good choices too. I just think its a bit pretentious of Subby to say its the most important space picture ever. One of the most iconic, yes,  but the most important? You could argue over that until the cows come home. One that comes to mind, how is this more important than the picture of Buzz Aldrin on the moon that is just as iconic? Not only was that a harder picture to take, since they had to land on the freaking moon but it has an actual human in the shot on the surface of another world.

Or this one of Eugene Cernan on the freaking moon with the earth above him?

[ep.yimg.com image 336x269]

Or this one with geologist Harrison Schmitt, old glory, and the earth above it?

[ep.yimg.com image 360x288]


Indeed. There are many good choices.

Add Ed White's spacewalk and the interstage separation footage (or a still from it...) from the first Saturn V launch...
 
2013-12-21 09:58:53 PM

bbfreak: What about Lunar Orbiter 1 which took the first earthrise picture two years before Apollo 8?


Nobody in 1966 saw the image you posted, which is a modern digital processing of the original data. The ability to convert an electronic image to analog (viewable) form and reproduce it for mass media was much more limited back then, so what most people saw was this:

i.imgur.com

Just a couple years later Apollo 8 returned color film negatives physically to Earth, a vastly superior image that could be reproduced in much higher quality. That's the one that mattered.
 
Displayed 49 of 49 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report