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(Pop Matters)   Doctor Who invented TV   (popmatters.com) divider line 38
    More: Hero, Doctor Who, Time Lords, physicians, The Dick Van Dyke Show, National Association of Broadcasters, Ebenezer Scrooge, The Andy Griffith Show, M.C. Escher  
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3759 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Dec 2013 at 12:50 PM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-12-20 09:08:33 AM
TL;DR, especially after finding 2 bad editing errors.
 
2013-12-20 12:13:15 PM
What PopMatters think's the 3rd Doctor looks like:

images.popmatters.com
 
2013-12-20 12:17:13 PM
Doctor, who invented TV?
 
2013-12-20 01:12:02 PM
Heh!

My wife works next to the warehouse where Philo Farnsworth invented television. (Nothing obvious, just a small brass plaque on the building) And many other things. Interesting guy! Too bad he's not very well known.

upload.wikimedia.org

Philo Taylor Farnsworth (August 19, 1906 - March 11, 1971) was an American inventor and television pioneer.[2] He made many contributions that were crucial to the early development of all-electronic television. He is perhaps best known for inventing the first fully functional all-electronic image pickup device (video camera tube), the "image dissector", as well as the first fully functional and complete all-electronic television system. He was also the first person to demonstrate such a system to the public.[3][4] Farnsworth developed a television system complete with receiver and camera, which he produced commercially in the firm of the Farnsworth Television and Radio Corporation, from 1938 to 1951.[5][6]

In later life, Farnsworth invented a small nuclear fusion device, the Farnsworth-Hirsch fusor, or simply "fusor", employing inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC). Although not a practical device for generating nuclear energy, the fusor serves as a viable source of neutrons.[7] The design of this device has been the acknowledged inspiration for other fusion approaches including the Polywell reactor concept in terms of a general approach to fusion design.[8] Farnsworth held 165 patents, mostly in radio and television.
 
2013-12-20 01:14:41 PM
Since it was on hiatus during the late 80's on through most of the 90's, does it really qualify as a full fifty years?
 
2013-12-20 01:15:30 PM
I like Dr. Who and all, but some people just go way overboard.
 
2013-12-20 01:15:41 PM

StopLurkListen: Heh!

My wife works next to the warehouse where Philo Farnsworth invented television. (Nothing obvious, just a small brass plaque on the building) And many other things. Interesting guy! Too bad he's not very well known.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x298]

Philo Taylor Farnsworth (August 19, 1906 - March 11, 1971) was an American inventor and television pioneer.[2] He made many contributions that were crucial to the early development of all-electronic television. He is perhaps best known for inventing the first fully functional all-electronic image pickup device (video camera tube), the "image dissector", as well as the first fully functional and complete all-electronic television system. He was also the first person to demonstrate such a system to the public.[3][4] Farnsworth developed a television system complete with receiver and camera, which he produced commercially in the firm of the Farnsworth Television and Radio Corporation, from 1938 to 1951.[5][6]

In later life, Farnsworth invented a small nuclear fusion device, the Farnsworth-Hirsch fusor, or simply "fusor", employing inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC). Although not a practical device for generating nuclear energy, the fusor serves as a viable source of neutrons.[7] The design of this device has been the acknowledged inspiration for other fusion approaches including the Polywell reactor concept in terms of a general approach to fusion design.[8] Farnsworth held 165 patents, mostly in radio and television.


When did he decide that he doesn't want to live on this planet anymore?
 
2013-12-20 01:28:26 PM

StopLurkListen: Heh!

My wife works next to the warehouse where Philo Farnsworth invented television. (Nothing obvious, just a small brass plaque on the building) And many other things. Interesting guy! Too bad he's not very well known.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x298]

Philo Taylor Farnsworth (August 19, 1906 - March 11, 1971) ....


THAT'S SLUGWORTH!!
 
2013-12-20 01:29:05 PM
TV's Vinnie:
When did he decide that he doesn't want to live on this planet anymore?

Philo Taylor Farnsworth (August 19, 1906 - March 11, 1971) was an American inventor and television pioneer.

\\ and yes
\ I read that in his voice you bastard.
 
2013-12-20 01:34:37 PM

TV's Vinnie: Since it was on hiatus during the late 80's on through most of the 90's, does it really qualify as a full fifty years?


Doctor Who persisted in many forms during the "hiatus".  The 8th Doctor alone had 73 books where he was The Doctor of record, which is more than any other doctor.

50 Years of Doctor Who on Television?  No.  50 years of Doctor Who?  yes.
 
2013-12-20 01:40:36 PM

TV's Vinnie: StopLurkListen: Heh!

My wife works next to the warehouse where Philo Farnsworth invented television. (Nothing obvious, just a small brass plaque on the building) And many other things. Interesting guy! Too bad he's not very well known.


Actually, John Logie Baird - a Scottish engineer and inventor -  invented the first television, with public demonstrations in 1926, a year before Farnsworth demonstrated his simple camera transmission of a straight line.

There is a long history of Scottish inventors dreaming things up, then seeing them made popular by Americans who had the money to invest in the ideas.
 
2013-12-20 01:43:52 PM

DjangoStonereaver: What PopMatters think's the 3rd Doctor looks like:

[images.popmatters.com image 250x250]


i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-20 01:56:39 PM
That was actually a great read, and a fairly interesting analysis of the television medium and how to adapt to it. The actual piece doesn't really argue that Doctor Who invented television, that's just the attention grabbing headline, it makes the case that it found a much better to work with the medium than most.
 
2013-12-20 02:02:44 PM
TFA's headline is trolling, but the article's not as useless as it could be.  Basically an article about TV serial standards, and they picked Dr. Who more or less at random (and because their primary audience is American so likely it drives the point about media going international better).  Could have written the same article almost word-for-word about Star Trek or even something less well-known that had a big surge remake after being out of production for a while, like Battlestar Galactica.
 
2013-12-20 02:11:29 PM
...nobody yet?  Y'all are slipping.

i.imgur.com

i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-20 02:13:51 PM

alkhemy: TV's Vinnie: StopLurkListen: Heh!

My wife works next to the warehouse where Philo Farnsworth invented television. (Nothing obvious, just a small brass plaque on the building) And many other things. Interesting guy! Too bad he's not very well known.

Actually, John Logie Baird - a Scottish engineer and inventor -  invented the first television, with public demonstrations in 1926, a year before Farnsworth demonstrated his simple camera transmission of a straight line.

There is a long history of Scottish inventors dreaming things up, then seeing them made popular by Americans who had the money to invest in the ideas.


alkhemy: TV's Vinnie: StopLurkListen: Heh!

My wife works next to the warehouse where Philo Farnsworth invented television. (Nothing obvious, just a small brass plaque on the building) And many other things. Interesting guy! Too bad he's not very well known.

Actually, John Logie Baird - a Scottish engineer and inventor -  invented the first television, with public demonstrations in 1926, a year before Farnsworth demonstrated his simple camera transmission of a straight line.

There is a long history of Scottish inventors dreaming things up, then seeing them made popular by Americans who had the money to invest in the ideas.


Correct (technically, the best kind!.jpg) -- Farnsworth wasn't the first to transmit and display an image. However, Farnsworth invented the first fully "electronic" television, the form of television we use today. The previous attempts were mechanical systems with mirrors and lenses and ... molecular structures ...stuff

"Many inventors had built electromechanical television systems before Farnsworth's seminal contribution, but Farnsworth designed and built the world's first working all-electronic television system, employing electronic scanning in both the pickup and display devices. He first demonstrated his system to the press on September 3, 1928,[22][24] and to the public at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia on August 25, 1934.[25]"
 
2013-12-20 02:14:12 PM
alkhemy: Actually, John Logie Baird - a Scottish engineer and inventor - invented the first television, with public demonstrations in 1926, a year before Farnsworth demonstrated his simple camera transmission of a straight line.

There is a long history of Scottish inventors dreaming things up, then seeing them made popular by Americans who had the money to invest in the ideas.



Baird developed a mechanical system that was a complete technical dead-end, and had no consequence for the way that television was broadcasted throughout the 20th century.
 
2013-12-20 02:24:58 PM

TV's Vinnie: Since it was on hiatus during the late 80's on through most of the 90's, does it really qualify as a full fifty years?


I would say no since there's a 17 year gap when there were no episodes, so it's more like 33 years.
 
2013-12-20 02:26:13 PM

Thwack: TV's Vinnie: Since it was on hiatus during the late 80's on through most of the 90's, does it really qualify as a full fifty years?

Doctor Who persisted in many forms during the "hiatus".  The 8th Doctor alone had 73 books where he was The Doctor of record, which is more than any other doctor.

50 Years of Doctor Who on Television?  No.  50 years of Doctor Who?  yes.


The 8th doctor, the one from the movie?
 
2013-12-20 02:27:51 PM
Well, if Al Gore can invent the Internet, then I guess Doctor Who can invent TV.
 
2013-12-20 02:30:22 PM
I wonder when Moffat will bring back the Evil Android Rastafarians?

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-20 03:14:14 PM

Jambalaya James: DALEKS ON MAI COMPUTER!!!


I much prefer the inflatable kind:

dalektricity.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-12-20 03:23:20 PM

DjangoStonereaver: Jambalaya James: DALEKS ON MAI COMPUTER!!!

I much prefer the inflatable kind:

[dalektricity.files.wordpress.com image 200x200]


img.fark.net

Take it all, baby
 
2013-12-20 03:47:49 PM
Doctor Who may have "invented" TV in the UK. Across the Atlantic, however, US Marshall Matt Dillon aims his steely gaze in your direction through the Gunsmoke.
 
2013-12-20 05:35:34 PM

Thwack: TV's Vinnie: Since it was on hiatus during the late 80's on through most of the 90's, does it really qualify as a full fifty years?

Doctor Who persisted in many forms during the "hiatus".  The 8th Doctor alone had 73 books where he was The Doctor of record, which is more than any other doctor.

50 Years of Doctor Who on Television?  No.  50 years of Doctor Who?  yes.


Don't forget the 8th Doctor audio dramas.

I'm glad he got a regeneration scene for the 50th. He deserved it.
 
2013-12-20 05:42:48 PM

FlashHarry: Doctor, who invented TV?


I thought the headline was going to be about the inventor of TV, with a PhD or MD, and the capitalization was the joke.  But it really is about Doctor Who.
 
2013-12-20 06:18:39 PM
If anyone wants a quirky look into early TV

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEi1ggtO5Oc
 
2013-12-20 06:38:15 PM

letrole: Baird developed a mechanical system that was a complete technical dead-end, and had no consequence for the way that television was broadcasted throughout the 20th century.


True, but then Farnsworth's invention (the Image Dissector tube - he didn't invent the CRT or the concept of scanning an image) wasn't practical either because it needed extremely bright lighting. It took an assortment of developments by various people to develop a practical system. For some reason people seem to like to think of invention as something done by a single genius in a vacuum, but there are usually lots of people working on the idea at the time and if the famous inventor had never existed it wouldn't have delayed the invention by very long.
 
2013-12-20 07:06:00 PM
skreened.com
 
2013-12-20 07:09:36 PM

Rising Ape: For some reason people seem to like to think of invention as something done by a single genius in a vacuum,


Or in Fark's case, from a vacuum...

Rising Ape: if the famous inventor had never existed it wouldn't have delayed the invention by very long.


That goes against the American notion of the hero-loner inventor who pulled himself up by his own bootstraps.... Very odd coming from a country that never stops talking about team players and how Jesus inspired them...

Or space. Apparently, the only way for people to invent anything is to do it in, or for, space. Makes me wonder how all these old-timers in 100 BS (Before Space) managed anything at all.
 
2013-12-20 07:56:43 PM

Satanic_Hamster: [skreened.com image 760x760]


nice shirt, but $35 usd ? bah .
 
2013-12-20 09:30:58 PM
TFA does a great job of taking an interesting topic and making it boring as hell, I must say.
 
2013-12-20 10:10:23 PM
Who is this Russell T. Davis TFA keeps referring to?
 
2013-12-20 10:57:28 PM

CitizenjaQ: Who is this Russell T. Davis TFA keeps referring to?


He was the head writer/Executive Producer that brought the show back in 2005 and ran the show through 2009.
 
2013-12-20 10:58:49 PM

cheer: Russell T. Davis


Russell T Davies was the point.
 
2013-12-20 10:59:16 PM

ArcadianRefugee: cheer: Russell T. Davis

Russell T Davies was the point.


I'm an idiot.
 
2013-12-21 06:16:09 AM
That's Nice. Too bad Captain Z-Ro in San Francisco invented Doctor Who years earlier...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jq6dz0VlDos
 
2013-12-21 12:41:43 PM

perigee: That's Nice. Too bad Captain Z-Ro in San Francisco invented Doctor Who years earlier...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jq6dz0VlDos


I was totally unaware of that show.  Thanks for the links!
 
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