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(Slate)   The ten best decisions of 2013. Apparently, Apple did something right this year   (slate.com) divider line 15
    More: PSA, Orange Is the New Black, Uber, Chromebook, share buyback, financial engineering, supply-side, activist investors, J.C. Penney  
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3020 clicks; posted to Business » on 20 Dec 2013 at 10:37 AM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-20 09:12:23 AM  
The culture of pursuing aggressive growth for the long term at the expense of short-term profits is common in Google's online-services homeland, but it's bracing to see Mountain View bringing the same spirit to consumer hardware.

B-b-but shareholders!?!

Smart businesses can balance both.  Shareholder value is important, but if you let that drive you to destroy the long-term viability of the actual business, the shareholder is no longer in a symbiotic relationship with the business.  The shareholder becomes a parasite.

Good on Google.
 
2013-12-20 09:34:41 AM  
Amazon pre-announces an illegal product.

One big problem with Amazon's plan for same-day delivery of small items via quadrotor drone is that they don't have the technology working yet. Another problem is that it's currently illegal. Announcing the nonexistent product on 60 Minutes is a smart way to make some lemonade. Get people talking about the potential benefits of this kind of delivery and you're doing some prelobbying on behalf of commercial drone legalization.


Wait, "prelobbying on behalf of commercial drone legalization"? Did he not understand it was just a great marketing ploy and nothing more?
 
2013-12-20 11:32:08 AM  
JC Penney's no-sales policy failed because Americans are dumb.  (Which, maybe means that JC Penney's execs were dumb for not realizing that.)  Still, dumb was clearly involved.
 
2013-12-20 11:40:12 AM  

scottydoesntknow: Amazon pre-announces an illegal product.

One big problem with Amazon's plan for same-day delivery of small items via quadrotor drone is that they don't have the technology working yet. Another problem is that it's currently illegal. Announcing the nonexistent product on 60 Minutes is a smart way to make some lemonade. Get people talking about the potential benefits of this kind of delivery and you're doing some prelobbying on behalf of commercial drone legalization.

Wait, "prelobbying on behalf of commercial drone legalization"? Did he not understand it was just a great marketing ploy and nothing more?


I wouldn't necessarily say "nothing more". 5-10 years from now is a long time. It might not be exactly what they said, but I imagine that Amazon might actually be working on a drone delivery service.
 
2013-12-20 11:52:05 AM  
Apple could shiat on burning orphans and their stock will go up... as long as they are not workers at Foxcann.
 
2013-12-20 12:03:03 PM  
"Apple hired Angela Ahrendts, seen here in London in September 2011, in one of the 10 best business decisions in 2013. "

Yup, can confirm that background is definitely London.
 
2013-12-20 12:14:41 PM  
Wow...a Fark listicle that wasn't completely pants-on-head stupid. *scratches head*
 
2013-12-20 12:44:37 PM  
Poor reporter. You're going to be ostracized. Don't you know that every decision Apple makes is wrong, and that they're doooomed! How dare you think for yourself, instead of parroting the standard bullshiat.

Opening the Apple Stores in the first place meant they were doooomed! Remember how that put them out of business? Oh, wait... the opposite of that. The stores make huge profits.

And remember how the iPhone was going to flop, and Apple was doooomed? That captain of industry Steve Ballmer said they'd never have any significant market share. How's he doing these days? Getting shiatcanned? What's the market share of Windows Phones? Oh, right about where he said the iPhone would be.
 
2013-12-20 01:25:55 PM  
List fails for not mentioning that the SF Giants refused to pick up Barry Zito's option. Sure it was an obvious decision, but that didn't mean the idiots in the front office weren't considering it.
 
2013-12-20 03:09:24 PM  
Where is Steve Ballmer resigning?

/Developers,Developers,  DEVELOPERS!
 
2013-12-20 03:50:30 PM  

Diogenes: Shareholder value is important...


Only to shareholders.  In truth, most shareholders are casino gamblers.  Beyond the IPO, they contribute neither human nor working capital to the business, and they don't lend money to a business (including holders of preferred stock).  Shareholders simply bet on each others' willingness to place value on a financial instrument that might be or not be related to the success of the business.  Stocks bought in the secondary market ought not to confer company ownership rights.
 
2013-12-20 08:52:00 PM  

acohn: Diogenes: Shareholder value is important...

Only to shareholders.  In truth, most shareholders are casino gamblers.  Beyond the IPO, they contribute neither human nor working capital to the business, and they don't lend money to a business (including holders of preferred stock).  Shareholders simply bet on each others' willingness to place value on a financial instrument that might be or not be related to the success of the business.  Stocks bought in the secondary market ought not to confer company ownership rights.


I mentioned before (not to you) that the Stock Market looks like a black box to me and this was one of the very reasons. The whole thing looks like a casino from a layman perspective. I'm glad to see that I wasn't off the mark.
 
2013-12-20 09:49:31 PM  

acohn: Only to shareholders.  In truth, most shareholders are casino gamblers.  Beyond the IPO, they contribute neither human nor working capital to the business, and they don't lend money to a business (including holders of preferred stock).  Shareholders simply bet on each others' willingness to place value on a financial instrument that might be or not be related to the success of the business.  Stocks bought in the secondary market ought not to confer company ownership rights.


The vast majority of stock is owned by professional fund managers who do give a damn about a return and don't look at the market as a big casino.

/usually those that look at the market that way are really bad at managing their finances
 
2013-12-21 08:53:14 AM  
They didn't release Windows 8?
 
2013-12-21 10:44:31 AM  

gingerjet: acohn: Only to shareholders.  In truth, most shareholders are casino gamblers.  Beyond the IPO, they contribute neither human nor working capital to the business, and they don't lend money to a business (including holders of preferred stock).  Shareholders simply bet on each others' willingness to place value on a financial instrument that might be or not be related to the success of the business.  Stocks bought in the secondary market ought not to confer company ownership rights.

The vast majority of stock is owned by professional fund managers who do give a damn about a return and don't look at the market as a big casino.

/usually those that look at the market that way are really bad at managing their finances


Why are "return" and "casino" mutually exclusive?

They do look at it like a big casino--just one that has no management to break their fingers if they "win" too much.
 
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