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(Gizmodo)   If you ever wanted to know what it was like to fly the fastest airplane in the world all while having missiles shot at you, you have to read this   (gizmodo.com) divider line 99
    More: Cool, transcontinental air speed record, SR-71 Blackbird, airplanes, missiles, terrorist training camp, hydraulic fluid, turn the lights, leading edge  
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6277 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Dec 2013 at 11:27 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-19 07:46:24 PM
Thta's airplane porn right there.
 
2013-12-19 07:46:52 PM
Like jet aircraft porn?  Read this.
 
2013-12-19 07:47:27 PM
Haha.
 
2013-12-19 08:24:46 PM

doyner: Thta's airplane porn right there.


I came
 
2013-12-19 08:26:59 PM
One day, high above Arizona , we were monitoring the radio traffic of all the mortal airplanes below us. First, a Cessna pilot asked the air traffic controllers to check his ground speed. 'Ninety knots,' ATC replied. A twin Bonanza soon made the same request. 'One-twenty on the ground,' was the reply. To our surprise, a navy F-18 came over the radio with a ground speed check. I knew exactly what he was doing. Of course, he had a ground speed indicator in his cockpit, but he wanted to let all the bug-smashers in the valley know what real speed was 'Dusty 52, we show you at 620 on the ground,' ATC responded. The situation was too ripe. I heard the click of Walter's mike button in the rear seat. In his most innocent voice, Walter startled the controller by asking for a ground speed check from 81,000 feet, clearly above controlled airspace. In a cool, professional voice, the controller replied, ' Aspen 20, I show you at 1,982 knots on the ground.' We did not hear another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

No matter how many times I have heard it, that story never gets old for me......
 
2013-12-19 08:31:34 PM
Knew a guy who wasn't ever a civilian engine specialist on the Bird.  He never had good stories about the plane.
 
2013-12-19 08:33:49 PM
If this is interesting to you and you haven't already, pick up a copy of this guy's book Sled Driver.
 
2013-12-19 09:36:16 PM
very well written.  very cool plane.
 
2013-12-19 09:48:12 PM
I didn't realize there was just one blackbird. I always assumed there were more.
 
2013-12-19 10:32:50 PM

Ambivalence: I didn't realize there was just one blackbird. I always assumed there were more.


They built 32.
 
2013-12-19 10:36:18 PM
See, that's the kind of military spending I can get behind, building things that push the limits of engineering so much that the result outperforms every countermeasure for decades on end.

If we could build something like that back in the 60s, just imagine what could be done with current technology if defense firms were in it to make the best possible machines instead of soaking the government for as much money as they can, racking up endless delays so that Congress just keeps the money flowing.
 
2013-12-19 10:39:15 PM

doyner: Ambivalence: I didn't realize there was just one blackbird. I always assumed there were more.

They built 32.


The article made it sound like there was only one.
 
2013-12-19 10:43:07 PM

Ambivalence: doyner: Ambivalence: I didn't realize there was just one blackbird. I always assumed there were more.

They built 32.

The article made it sound like there was only one.


FTA:  Lockheed engineers used a titanium alloy to construct more than 90 percent of the SR-71, creating special tools and manufacturing procedures to hand-build each of the 40 planes.
 
2013-12-19 11:00:30 PM

TwistedIvory: If this is interesting to you and you haven't already, pick up a copy of this guy's book Sled Driver.


Here ya go.
 
2013-12-19 11:01:36 PM
The pointy bits of the SR-71's engine nacelles were not, contrary to popular belief, tits.

Above certain speeds and altitudes, the SR-71 would transform into a ramjet, and in that configuration could go well past mach 3 and well above 80,000 feet.

And it was expensive as all hell to keep in the air.

The worst part of flying in the SR-71 is not being able to scratch your nose.
 
2013-12-19 11:04:28 PM
I still can't get over that they did that in 1962. I wonder what classified birds are flying now that are just so incredible you can't even believe it?
I would bet that they have scramjets up and running .
 
2013-12-19 11:44:17 PM

sithon: I still can't get over that they did that in 1962. I wonder what classified birds are flying now that are just so incredible you can't even believe it?
I would bet that they have scramjets up and running .


Now consider that technologically, we did not catch up to the Romans until about 1850.
 
2013-12-19 11:44:28 PM

sithon: I still can't get over that they did that in 1962. I wonder what classified birds are flying now that are just so incredible you can't even believe it?
I would bet that they have scramjets up and running .


This is what always amazes me.

I mean, the B2 is untouchable and an amazing piece of technology. It was introduced 25 years ago. Just think of the crazy sophisticated drones we're going to hear about in 2030
 
2013-12-19 11:48:36 PM

twistedmetal: One day, high above Arizona , we were monitoring the radio traffic of all the mortal airplanes below us. First, a Cessna pilot asked the air traffic controllers to check his ground speed. 'Ninety knots,' ATC replied. A twin Bonanza soon made the same request. 'One-twenty on the ground,' was the reply. To our surprise, a navy F-18 came over the radio with a ground speed check. I knew exactly what he was doing. Of course, he had a ground speed indicator in his cockpit, but he wanted to let all the bug-smashers in the valley know what real speed was 'Dusty 52, we show you at 620 on the ground,' ATC responded. The situation was too ripe. I heard the click of Walter's mike button in the rear seat. In his most innocent voice, Walter startled the controller by asking for a ground speed check from 81,000 feet, clearly above controlled airspace. In a cool, professional voice, the controller replied, ' Aspen 20, I show you at 1,982 knots on the ground.' We did not hear another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

No matter how many times I have heard it, that story never gets old for me......


Came for this.

/Yes, I know what that sounds like
// I did
 
2013-12-19 11:48:54 PM
 
2013-12-19 11:49:50 PM

bulldg4life: sithon: I still can't get over that they did that in 1962. I wonder what classified birds are flying now that are just so incredible you can't even believe it?
I would bet that they have scramjets up and running .

This is what always amazes me.

I mean, the B2 is untouchable and an amazing piece of technology. It was introduced 25 years ago. Just think of the crazy sophisticated drones we're going to hear about in 2030


I want to believe that there are crazy cool planes being flown right now that we don't know a thing about, but the cynic in me tends to think that keeping such things completely secret would be nearly impossible today.

I'm not sure how I feel about everything moving towards drones.  On one hand, the machines can do a lot more when the designers don't have to worry about keeping a pilot alive, but on the other it just seems so much cooler when there's a person controlling everything.  It's like the Curiosity rover - it's doing all sorts of worthwhile science, and it was a fantastic feat to get it to Mars, but it would have been more spectacular to land a person, have him walk around and fill some jars with dirt, and then fly right back home.
 
2013-12-19 11:53:20 PM
 
2013-12-19 11:55:56 PM

bulldg4life: the B2 is untouchable


The B2 puts out a red hot jet exhaust like all other jets.  In strike mode, the fuel can be re-circulated around the exhaust to absorb the heat, reducing its IR signature..

This process reaches a limit at some point.

The other problem with the B2 is that while its radar profile is that of a turkey, it is the only turkey in the sky doing 600 knots at 45,000 feet.
 
2013-12-20 12:03:21 AM
Y'all want jet porn - this is a CD of jet sounds: http://www.aircraftrecords.com/supersonics.html

Also includes an interview with Rogers Smith, the last pilot to fly the SR-71.
 
2013-12-20 12:08:35 AM

Marcus Aurelius: sithon: I still can't get over that they did that in 1962. I wonder what classified birds are flying now that are just so incredible you can't even believe it?
I would bet that they have scramjets up and running .

Now consider that technologically, we did not catch up to the Romans until about 1850.


are you implying that we are now on a downward slide to a new dark age?

If so I hope you are wrong.
 
2013-12-20 12:14:24 AM

Marcus Aurelius: Above certain speeds and altitudes, the SR-71 would transform into a ramjet, and in that configuration could go well past mach 3 and well above 80,000 feet.


You can position the shock wave with a giant splitter plate too. Gets you to Mach 3.06 with just the prototype.

www.wingweb.co.uk

sithon: Marcus Aurelius: sithon: I still can't get over that they did that in 1962. I wonder what classified birds are flying now that are just so incredible you can't even believe it?
I would bet that they have scramjets up and running .

Now consider that technologically, we did not catch up to the Romans until about 1850.

are you implying that we are now on a downward slide to a new dark age?

If so I hope you are wrong.


We are at a funny time. You don't want to read any Chris Hedges if you don't like gloom.

We made horrible choices as a species and give control to the worst examples of the species.

Ugh.
 
2013-12-20 12:16:59 AM
JungleBoogie FTW!!
 
2013-12-20 12:22:21 AM

TuteTibiImperes: I want to believe that there are crazy cool planes being flown right now that we don't know a thing about, but the cynic in me tends to think that keeping such things completely secret would be nearly impossible today.


You are right. I mean, we got pictures of the Lockheed Martin Sentinel while the air force kept saying they didn't know what the hell it was.

But, I'm sure they can still keep some stuff quiet.

Marcus Aurelius: Buzzkill stuff

You know what I mean. The thing is still one of the most advanced planes on the planet. And, I'm assuming, short of China...the thing can probably overfly any country around. Yes, it isn't perfect, but still pretty damn advanced for being developed in the mid80s. I'm not sure how much other technology is still at the top of its class from that time period.
 
2013-12-20 12:26:46 AM

twistedmetal: One day, high above Arizona , we were monitoring the radio traffic of all the mortal airplanes below us. First, a Cessna pilot asked the air traffic controllers to check his ground speed. 'Ninety knots,' ATC replied. A twin Bonanza soon made the same request. 'One-twenty on the ground,' was the reply. To our surprise, a navy F-18 came over the radio with a ground speed check. I knew exactly what he was doing. Of course, he had a ground speed indicator in his cockpit, but he wanted to let all the bug-smashers in the valley know what real speed was 'Dusty 52, we show you at 620 on the ground,' ATC responded. The situation was too ripe. I heard the click of Walter's mike button in the rear seat. In his most innocent voice, Walter startled the controller by asking for a ground speed check from 81,000 feet, clearly above controlled airspace. In a cool, professional voice, the controller replied, ' Aspen 20, I show you at 1,982 knots on the ground.' We did not hear another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

No matter how many times I have heard it, that story never gets old for me......


I love plane porn

I was just thinking, the time between the Wright brother flight, and the first SR-71 flight, is probably shorter than the time between the first SR-71 flight and now. I would have to wiki to make sure, but it puts some technological things into perspective.
 
2013-12-20 12:28:56 AM

saturn badger: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 160x160]

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_0_11?url=search-alias%3Dstrip bo oks&field-keywords=skunk%20works&sprefix=skunk+works%2Caps%2C553

Read about how it was built. It makes it even more amazing. Great book.


Agreed.  Not only the SR-71 stuff, but the stories about engineering the U2 and F117 as well, along with testing stealth tech, that book was awesome.
 
2013-12-20 12:29:50 AM

Kittypie070: JungleBoogie FTW!!


The SR-71 was apparently not an easy aircraft to fly. Smith recalls some emergency - I seem to recall it was a compressor stall - and talked about getting behind the aircraft inputs, not being able to relight as the jet sliced towards the ground. Fascinating stuff. The entire CD is glorious on a good sound system.
 
2013-12-20 12:31:40 AM
Brian and the rest with the 9th are all heroes...
 
2013-12-20 12:33:56 AM
"On a typical training mission, we would take off near Sacramento, refuel over Nevada, accelerate into Montana, obtain high Mach over Colorado, turn right over New Mexico, speed across the Los Angeles Basin, run up the West Coast, turn right at Seattle, then return to Beale. Total flight time: two hours and 40 minutes."

Holy shiat!
 
2013-12-20 12:37:32 AM

saturn badger: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 160x160]

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_0_11?url=search-alias%3Dstrip bo oks&field-keywords=skunk%20works&sprefix=skunk+works%2Caps%2C553

Read about how it was built. It makes it even more amazing. Great book.


Second this. One of my favorite books.

Politically relevant point of the book: the B1 bomber was killed by "weak Democrat" Carter, but brought back by "strong Republican" Reagan (also made in California, where Reagan was from). Problem with that was the the existence of the then classified stealth fighter made the B1 completely obsolete, Which is exactly why it was scrapped. So Reagan didn't make us stronger, he weakened us with unnecessary spending. Now if you want to complain about me bringing up politics where it shouldn't be: bullshat. People need to know this shiat in order to them to realize how propaganda works.
 
2013-12-20 12:41:46 AM

TuteTibiImperes: I want to believe that there are crazy cool planes being flown right now that we don't know a thing about, but the cynic in me tends to think that keeping such things completely secret would be nearly impossible today.


Agree.

Aeronautics had its exponential growth in the early 1900s, and matured quickly. We have exponential growth in electronics currently.

They thought they were going to Mars, we think we're going to either cylons or porn bots.
 
2013-12-20 01:05:46 AM

2wolves: Knew a guy who wasn't ever a civilian engine specialist on the Bird.  He never had good stories about the plane.


It wouldn't surprise me, a machine that's pushing the limits of speed probably requires a load of extra maintenance.
 
2013-12-20 01:17:08 AM
img.gawkerassets.com

You'd think they were preparing to destroy the death star.
 
2013-12-20 01:18:36 AM

TuteTibiImperes: I want to believe that there are crazy cool planes being flown right now that we don't know a thing about, but the cynic in me tends to think that keeping such things completely secret would be nearly impossible today.


What they are working on is ways to shoot down anything that flies in the skies today, then come up with ways to outfly that stuff.

We are talking about EMP bursts, laser beams, and other nasties.  The aircraft design are ranging from lower atmosphere "ass-splitters" that can literally swerve around a bullet to suborbitals that just can't been seen. The proverbial cloaking field.

You give the engineers and designers enough time and money, and they will build you the freaking future.
 
2013-12-20 01:26:47 AM

Marcus Aurelius: Now consider that technologically, we did not catch up to the Romans until about 1850.


Well, that's entirely inaccurate.
 
2013-12-20 01:33:58 AM

Marcus Aurelius: The other problem with the B2 is that while its radar profile is that of a turkey, it is the only turkey in the sky doing 600 knots at 45,000 feet.


As God is my witness, I thought turkeys can fly 600 knots.
 
2013-12-20 01:34:51 AM

Harry_Seldon: Marcus Aurelius: Now consider that technologically, we did not catch up to the Romans until about 1850.

Well, that's entirely inaccurate.


If he's talking about the technology of plumbing, he's pretty accurate.

Projectiles, not so much.

Plumbing is a pretty big thing, even though we don't think about it much. It's literally hidden behind our walls. But it's probably the single most important advance in human health in the history of humans. Someone could write a book about it, and I'm pretty sure some have, but no one reads them, because hey, it's plumbing. Which speaks to its total efficiency making it so boring.

His point accidentally brings up how advances in technology don't affect all fields equally, which is interesting in its own regard.
 
2013-12-20 01:43:29 AM

Harry_Seldon: Marcus Aurelius: The other problem with the B2 is that while its radar profile is that of a turkey, it is the only turkey in the sky doing 600 knots at 45,000 feet.

As God is my witness, I thought turkeys can fly 600 knots.


Interesting story from the skunkworks book, the first F-117 prototype mock-up they put on a stand to measure the radar cross-section was comparable to the eyeball of a turkey. But they didn't have to give it a cockpit or an engine. I think they also had to do some work on the actual stand, to make it stealthy, otherwise they couldn't even get a usable reading.

Just a guess, but the "super secret" planes of today are high-stealth drones and cruse missiles. Seriously, have you heard of a "stealth" cruise missile? It would be the most deadly weapon. The easiest to keep secret. And like the "mock-up" mentioned earlier, it wouldn't need a highly visible canopy (from radar point of view).
 
2013-12-20 01:49:36 AM
I wonder how many times this article has gone green on Fark. Old article is old. I love the Blackbird as much as anyone, but I doubt anything new has been written about that plane in years.
 
2013-12-20 01:56:25 AM

doyner: Thta's airplane porn right there.


I think I just filled the cup.

I saw one at an air show when I was a kid.  I couldn't believe they were flying that amazing beast for us slack-jawed yokels but there it was blasting along just above the runway.  Felt like a gorilla was jumping on my chest.  Holy shiat!
 
2013-12-20 02:10:03 AM
static2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-12-20 02:12:37 AM

impaler: twistedmetal: One day, high above Arizona , we were monitoring the radio traffic of all the mortal airplanes below us. First, a Cessna pilot asked the air traffic controllers to check his ground speed. 'Ninety knots,' ATC replied. A twin Bonanza soon made the same request. 'One-twenty on the ground,' was the reply. To our surprise, a navy F-18 came over the radio with a ground speed check. I knew exactly what he was doing. Of course, he had a ground speed indicator in his cockpit, but he wanted to let all the bug-smashers in the valley know what real speed was 'Dusty 52, we show you at 620 on the ground,' ATC responded. The situation was too ripe. I heard the click of Walter's mike button in the rear seat. In his most innocent voice, Walter startled the controller by asking for a ground speed check from 81,000 feet, clearly above controlled airspace. In a cool, professional voice, the controller replied, ' Aspen 20, I show you at 1,982 knots on the ground.' We did not hear another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

No matter how many times I have heard it, that story never gets old for me......

I love plane porn

I was just thinking, the time between the Wright brother flight, and the first SR-71 flight, is probably shorter than the time between the first SR-71 flight and now. I would have to wiki to make sure, but it puts some technological things into perspective.


Nah, first SR-71 flight was December 1964, 49 years ago, and 61 years after the Wright Brothers. The 60's weren't THAT long ago.
 
2013-12-20 02:37:26 AM

cptjeff: I was just thinking, the time between the Wright brother flight, and the first SR-71 flight, is probably shorter than the time between the first SR-71 flight and now. I would have to wiki to make sure, but it puts some technological things into perspective.

Nah, first SR-71 flight was December 1964, 49 years ago, and 61 years after the Wright Brothers. The 60's weren't THAT long ago.


Well, there you have it.

But my statement stands for the U2. Yes, I bothered to actually check the dates on that one.
 
2013-12-20 02:53:10 AM
I thought it was interesting how it was designed to leak fuel on the tarmac.
 
2013-12-20 02:56:22 AM
Um...yeah I don't doubt the guys story....but his timing of being 10 years old and building a revell model of the sr71 doesn't jibe time wise...at all...
 
2013-12-20 03:06:41 AM
I only got to see it on the ground at the Pima Air and Space Museum in Tucson when I was going to U of A. It's beautiful.

Could not stop reading that story. It really gets the pulse going.
 
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