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(Business Standard)   Neanderthal genome project shows that West Virginia really hasn't changed much since then   (business-standard.com) divider line 9
    More: Interesting, Neanderthals, genomes, Neanderthal genome project, West Virginia, genome project, inbreeding, Homo erectus, Denisovans  
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916 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Dec 2013 at 8:53 AM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-19 08:58:26 AM
I do research on unexplained genetic diseases. That level of inbreeding isn't exactly uncommon pretty much everywhere on the planet.
 
2013-12-19 10:22:30 AM

entropic_existence: I do research on unexplained genetic diseases. That level of inbreeding isn't exactly uncommon pretty much everywhere on the planet.


Do you think the evolution from proto-humans was more successful when and where in-breeding was less common?  Wondered that after I RTFA.
 
2013-12-19 11:15:55 AM

SoupJohnB: entropic_existence: I do research on unexplained genetic diseases. That level of inbreeding isn't exactly uncommon pretty much everywhere on the planet.

Do you think the evolution from proto-humans was more successful when and where in-breeding was less common?  Wondered that after I RTFA.


I doubt there were any substantial differences in inbreeding rates between Neanderthals, Denisovans, and  Homo sapiens during the relevant time periods. Certainly not enough to effect populations on an evolutionary scale.
 
2013-12-19 11:27:40 AM

entropic_existence: SoupJohnB: entropic_existence: I do research on unexplained genetic diseases. That level of inbreeding isn't exactly uncommon pretty much everywhere on the planet.

Do you think the evolution from proto-humans was more successful when and where in-breeding was less common?  Wondered that after I RTFA.

I doubt there were any substantial differences in inbreeding rates between Neanderthals, Denisovans, and  Homo sapiens during the relevant time periods. Certainly not enough to effect populations on an evolutionary scale.


"Doubt" is a hallmark of scientific inquiry.  So can you explain the Tea Party?  They seem to doubt a lot of things! :)
 
2013-12-19 11:33:11 AM
Next up: Discovery of a fossil banjo.
 
2013-12-19 12:46:02 PM

SoupJohnB: "Doubt" is a hallmark of scientific inquiry.  So can you explain the Tea Party?  They seem to doubt a lot of things! :)


Stupidity?

Anyway, as for the actual science, we don't have enough sequenced ancient individuals to have empirical estimates of inbreeding rates. But the current genomic data seems to indicate fairly similar population structures. So my doubtfulness in this regard is at least somewhat based on current evidence and data :)
 
2013-12-19 02:18:56 PM
Yes, but you're into "mainstream" Science.  Ancient Alien Astronaut theorists, on the other hand that...

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2013-12-19 04:33:08 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-20 02:59:11 AM
Does that mean Humans are descendants of the skinny runts of the litter?
 
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