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(Gizmodo)   Nazi secret weapons that were developed while Hitler was busy with his rant videos   (sploid.gizmodo.com) divider line 106
    More: Interesting, Nazis, Luftwaffe, Richard Wagner, antitank missiles, not proven, TV Guide, weapons  
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12433 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Dec 2013 at 9:04 AM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-19 08:40:44 AM  

The ME-262 could even be produced using recycled materials...

i1125.photobucket.com
 
2013-12-19 08:59:00 AM  
This is the picture that heads the "SECRET WEAPONS OF THE LUFTWAFFE" section:


img.gawkerassets.com

The Luftwaffe use u-boats?  I thought that is what the Kriegsmarine did.
 
2013-12-19 09:03:12 AM  
Missing from list:

images4.wikia.nocookie.net

1.bp.blogspot.com

smhttp.14409.nexcesscdn.net
 
2013-12-19 09:06:04 AM  
Also, while they mention the Type XXI large "electroboot" u-boat, they skipped the smaller, but actually successful, Type XXIII electroboot:

No Type XXIII u-boats were sunk by the Allies while they were on active patrol, when going to see on a conventional u-boat was pretty much a death sentence, and Type XXIII boats managed to sink 5 ships, including the last two ships sunk by German forces in WWII.  Those last two ships were sunk in the Firth of Forth, which of course is a Scottish estuary.
 
2013-12-19 09:08:28 AM  

dittybopper: Also, while they mention the Type XXI large "electroboot" u-boat, they skipped the smaller, but actually successful, Type XXIII electroboot:


i42.tinypic.com

Now with picture goodness.
 
2013-12-19 09:10:28 AM  
www.tubefilter.com

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-19 09:13:02 AM  
www.progarchives.com
 
2013-12-19 09:13:37 AM  
Also feels woefully left out:

www.truefreethinker.com
 
2013-12-19 09:13:46 AM  
Big titted Nazi vampires?
images.g4tv.com
 
2013-12-19 09:14:26 AM  
TFA also forgot to mention the Allies came up with an effective jammer for those remote-controlled bombs.  The Luftwaffe had some initial success, then...not so much.

Plus, the Allies were fine-tuning their radar-guided 90mm flak by then.  And getting their AA proximity fuses working.

Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.  Heck, they might have forced the first nukes to be used on Germany, rather than Japan.

Of course, they'd have had to cut something else to do it, and since some of their artillery on the East Front was down to five rounds a day in '44, that wouldn't have been an easy choice...not a lot of slack in their economy at that point.
 
2013-12-19 09:15:30 AM  
You lost. get over it.
 
2013-12-19 09:16:06 AM  

Sinclair.laker: The ME-262 could even be produced using recycled materials...

[i1125.photobucket.com image 850x622]


Or you could just shell out the $1 million asking price for a modern reproduction (with better engines).

http://www.stormbirds.com/project/
 
2013-12-19 09:18:06 AM  
Keep your Steampunk clockwork stuff.

I prefer the WWII era design ethic in most things.
 
2013-12-19 09:20:15 AM  
No Triebflugel?
discaircraft.greyfalcon.us
 
2013-12-19 09:21:45 AM  
images3.wikia.nocookie.net

/All of the good ones were taken.
 
2013-12-19 09:25:34 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: Keep your Steampunk clockwork stuff.

I prefer the WWII era design ethic in most things.


Excellent documentary on that design ethic. Well worth your time.


PunGent: Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.



As the historian George Forty points out: "It was generally assumed that it took five Shermans to knock out one Panther. The German built around 4,500 Panthers. The Americans built 50,000 Shermans."

/may not have been the furstest, but we had the mostest
//yes, I know that quote is most likely spurious
 
2013-12-19 09:25:54 AM  
Zombie Nazi's - never fully deployed (cool outfits though)

www.walldime.com
 
2013-12-19 09:28:59 AM  
i6.photobucket.com

What about the secret Nazi zombies?
 
2013-12-19 09:29:25 AM  
Things would definitely have gone differently if the Germans concentrated on their guided Surface to Aim missile/rockets that were manually guided meaning you couldn't jam them.  They could have easily built hundreds or thousands for each V1/V2 meaning no bombings over Germany impacting their war machine.
 
2013-12-19 09:31:44 AM  
Fine... I'll be the old guy who posts this:

i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-19 09:34:39 AM  

Parthenogenetic: Fine... I'll be the old guy who posts this:


I'm glad you saved me the effort. This article made me very nostalgic for SWOTL.
 
2013-12-19 09:37:20 AM  

OldManDownDRoad: DjangoStonereaver: Keep your Steampunk clockwork stuff.

I prefer the WWII era design ethic in most things.

Excellent documentary on that design ethic. Well worth your time.


PunGent: Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.


As the historian George Forty points out: "It was generally assumed that it took five Shermans to knock out one Panther. The German built around 4,500 Panthers. The Americans built 50,000 Shermans."

/may not have been the furstest, but we had the mostest
//yes, I know that quote is most likely spurious


Field Marshal Zhukov: Quantity has a quality of its own.
His reply to being told you have more tanks but the German tanks are better quality than the Russian ones.
 
2013-12-19 09:38:10 AM  
Aircraft fanciers go to luft46 to see more.
 
2013-12-19 09:42:56 AM  
Forgot one
imageshack.us
 
2013-12-19 09:47:31 AM  

Thats an 827: OldManDownDRoad: DjangoStonereaver: Keep your Steampunk clockwork stuff.

I prefer the WWII era design ethic in most things.

Excellent documentary on that design ethic. Well worth your time.


PunGent: Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.


As the historian George Forty points out: "It was generally assumed that it took five Shermans to knock out one Panther. The German built around 4,500 Panthers. The Americans built 50,000 Shermans."

/may not have been the furstest, but we had the mostest
//yes, I know that quote is most likely spurious

Field Marshal Zhukov: Quantity has a quality of its own.
His reply to being told you have more tanks but the German tanks are better quality than the Russian ones.



Seems like they were trying to overcome their disadvantage in manpower and resources through technology, but the sheer number of these designs suggests a serious lack of coordination.

Things might've been different if they had concentrated on improving a few promising programs and not wasting time on things like orbital bombardment and uncontrollable rocket fighters.
 
2013-12-19 09:49:41 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2013-12-19 09:49:46 AM  

PunGent: TFA also forgot to mention the Allies came up with an effective jammer for those remote-controlled bombs.  The Luftwaffe had some initial success, then...not so much.

Plus, the Allies were fine-tuning their radar-guided 90mm flak by then.  And getting their AA proximity fuses working.

Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.  Heck, they might have forced the first nukes to be used on Germany, rather than Japan. they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.

Of course, they'd have had to cut something else to do it, and since some of their artillery on the East Front was down to five rounds a day in '44, that wouldn't have been an easy choice...not a lot of slack in their economy at that point.


/FTFY
 
2013-12-19 09:49:51 AM  

dittybopper: dittybopper: Also, while they mention the Type XXI large "electroboot" u-boat, they skipped the smaller, but actually successful, Type XXIII electroboot:

[i42.tinypic.com image 500x313]

Now with picture goodness.


========================

Speaking of U-boats, U-869 was found sunk off the coast of New Jersey in 1991.  It's believed that the sub was sunk in Feb, 1945.  According to Kreigsmarine records, U-869 was supposed to be patrolling near Gibraltar at the time.   How it got to New Jersey, no one knows.   How the sub was destroyed is a mystery as well, since the US Navy claims no knowledge of anti-sub operations in that area in Feb, of 1945.  Secret mission?  Was the crew trying to surrender in the US?  Where they trying out for The Jersey Shore Show?  We may never have the answer.

Since the discovery of the sub, which is at the limits of scuba diving  depth, 3 divers have died exploring the wreck.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-869
 
2013-12-19 09:54:26 AM  

TheDirtyNacho: Seems like they were trying to overcome their disadvantage in manpower and resources through technology, but the sheer number of these designs suggests a serious lack of coordination.


When you are doing research and development, you don't want to control that too tightly because you never know when you have a winner on your hands until it actually goes into at least limited production and is tested.

For example, take the MP-44/StG-44:  Hitler had forbidden development work on a new rifle because the Kar-98k was "adequate" for infantry use, so the people developing what would become the first modern 'assault rifle' called it a "machine pistol" instead, in order to continue developing it.

Had they followed the edicts of their Fuhrer to the letter, it never would have been developed.
 
2013-12-19 09:56:19 AM  

Fissile: dittybopper: dittybopper: Also, while they mention the Type XXI large "electroboot" u-boat, they skipped the smaller, but actually successful, Type XXIII electroboot:

[i42.tinypic.com image 500x313]

Now with picture goodness.

========================

Speaking of U-boats, U-869 was found sunk off the coast of New Jersey in 1991.  It's believed that the sub was sunk in Feb, 1945.  According to Kreigsmarine records, U-869 was supposed to be patrolling near Gibraltar at the time.   How it got to New Jersey, no one knows.   How the sub was destroyed is a mystery as well, since the US Navy claims no knowledge of anti-sub operations in that area in Feb, of 1945.  Secret mission?  Was the crew trying to surrender in the US?  Where they trying out for The Jersey Shore Show?  We may never have the answer.

Since the discovery of the sub, which is at the limits of scuba diving  depth, 3 divers have died exploring the wreck.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-869


Shadow Divers is a pretty good book, I recommend it. Not just for the U-Boaty-ness but it's an interesting insight into obsession and bravado...
 
2013-12-19 10:00:31 AM  

Parthenogenetic: Fine... I'll be the old guy who posts this:

[i.imgur.com image 350x447]


Dammit, I was going to post that.  :(
 
2013-12-19 10:02:31 AM  

dittybopper: when going to see on a conventional u-boat was pretty much a death sentence


Going to see what?
 
2013-12-19 10:05:21 AM  

TheDirtyNacho: Seems like they were trying to overcome their disadvantage in manpower and resources through technology, but the sheer number of these designs suggests a serious lack of coordination.


====================

German industry never reached the level of central control as it did in the USSR.  Stalin had much more power in this regard than did Hitler.  The Soviets standardized on a few promising (not perfect) designs and then produced the shiat out of them.  The Russians and Americas were also believers in the school of Good Enough.  Lots of that German stuff was ridiculously complicated.  If you ever worked on a Mercedes, you know what I'm talking about.
 
2013-12-19 10:05:43 AM  

DeathCipris: they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.


Really?
 
2013-12-19 10:06:06 AM  

dittybopper: TheDirtyNacho: Seems like they were trying to overcome their disadvantage in manpower and resources through technology, but the sheer number of these designs suggests a serious lack of coordination.

When you are doing research and development, you don't want to control that too tightly because you never know when you have a winner on your hands until it actually goes into at least limited production and is tested.

For example, take the MP-44/StG-44:  Hitler had forbidden development work on a new rifle because the Kar-98k was "adequate" for infantry use, so the people developing what would become the first modern 'assault rifle' called it a "machine pistol" instead, in order to continue developing it.

Had they followed the edicts of their Fuhrer to the letter, it never would have been developed.


"Der Furher" didn't like any sort of automatic rifle as he thought it encouraged soldiers to waste ammo. Towards the end of the war, there were massive stockpiles of 8mm ammunition. Out of necessity and ingenuity, the developers created the "7.92x33 Kurz" round, which is essentially an 8mm with the casing cut in half and a new primer slapped on it. Boom, no need to create a whole new round. The story goes that Hitler had refused to test the StG44 over and over again, until finally he was handed the weapon and told to give it a try. He loved it so much he ordered they immediately be put into production.

It saddens me deeply that most of the StG44's in existence in the world are over in Syria and other middle eastern nations for use in rebellions and slaying instead of in museums. Also, I really farking want one.
 
2013-12-19 10:08:20 AM  

dittybopper: TheDirtyNacho: Seems like they were trying to overcome their disadvantage in manpower and resources through technology, but the sheer number of these designs suggests a serious lack of coordination.

When you are doing research and development, you don't want to control that too tightly because you never know when you have a winner on your hands until it actually goes into at least limited production and is tested.

For example, take the MP-44/StG-44:  Hitler had forbidden development work on a new rifle because the Kar-98k was "adequate" for infantry use, so the people developing what would become the first modern 'assault rifle' called it a "machine pistol" instead, in order to continue developing it.

Had they followed the edicts of their Fuhrer to the letter, it never would have been developed.


You bring up a very good point:  for all their technological potential, the Germans were in some ways
quite hidebound.  They were willing to innovate with known and proven technologies (blitzkrieg tactics
for example), but were not willing to spend too much on things like jet engines and rockets before the
war started going badly for them.

If the Nazis had the foresight to let (I think) Heinkel develop their jet engines in the late 30s when the
company first approached the government to support them, they could have gone into the Battle of Britain
with jet powered planes, and things would have been very different.

(This is a recollection of an old Brian Ford book, so I may have some of the details wrong)
 
2013-12-19 10:10:39 AM  
Things might've been different if they had concentrated on improving a few promising programs and not wasting time on things like orbital bombardment and uncontrollable rocket fighters.

Yep as it was Germany didn't have the industrial base to go to toe over a period of time with the allies and Sovs. The confused and unfocused R&D programs they ran to keep ahead only made matters very much worse.
That Jaeger fighter might have made a difference but it was so badly made it probably would have been more of a threat to its own pilots, not that there was anyone with experience left to fly them by the time they were being phased in.
 
2013-12-19 10:10:41 AM  

DeathCipris: PunGent: TFA also forgot to mention the Allies came up with an effective jammer for those remote-controlled bombs.  The Luftwaffe had some initial success, then...not so much.

Plus, the Allies were fine-tuning their radar-guided 90mm flak by then.  And getting their AA proximity fuses working.

Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.  Heck, they might have forced the first nukes to be used on Germany, rather than Japan. they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.

Of course, they'd have had to cut something else to do it, and since some of their artillery on the East Front was down to five rounds a day in '44, that wouldn't have been an easy choice...not a lot of slack in their economy at that point.

/FTFY


Really? The Manhattan Project all happened between May 7 and July 16, 1945?
 
2013-12-19 10:12:22 AM  

ChipNASA: You lost. get over it.


www.germanhelmet.com

Heritage, not hate.
 
2013-12-19 10:15:38 AM  

Fissile: Speaking of U-boats, U-869 was found sunk off the coast of New Jersey in 1991.  It's believed that the sub was sunk in Feb, 1945.  According to Kreigsmarine records, U-869 was supposed to be patrolling near Gibraltar at the time.   How it got to New Jersey, no one knows.   How the sub was destroyed is a mystery as well, since the US Navy claims no knowledge of anti-sub operations in that area in Feb, of 1945.  Secret mission?  Was the crew trying to surrender in the US?  Where they trying out for The Jersey Shore Show?  We may never have the answer.


Actually, it's not that much of a mystery.

When U-869 sailed, it had orders to patrol off the American coast.  After U-869 sailed, BdU changed its orders to go to the Gibraltar area instead of across the Atlantic, and radioed U-869 to that effect.

Now, at that time (February 1945), it was a dangerous thing for a u-boat to surface, which means it probably spent most of the time underwater, either running on batteries or snorkeling.  That means the only effective way that BdU could contact the boat was via the VLF radio, which will penetrate seawater to at least a certain depth.  The boat couldn't respond by that means, however, because it didn't have a VLF transmitter or antenna large enough*.  It would have to surface to transmit a confirmation back to BdU via HF radio, something that a u-boat commander in 1945 would be loathe to do.

BdU transmitted the updated orders to U-869 and assumed they were read and it's probable that BdU viewed the lack of confirmation from the boat was just the commander being smart about not exposing himself to radar by surfacing and to HF/DF by transmitting.

It's apparent now, however, that U-869 never received those updated orders, and continued on its way across the Atlantic, where it met its fate without ever transmitting the location of its demise.

After the war, there was an effort to correlate u-boat losses with Allied attacks on submarines, and BdU records showed that U-869 should have been in the Gibraltar area, according to the orders transmitted to it, during the time an attack was done on a u-boat in that area, and so they put 2 and 2 together and got 5.

It's really not that much of a mystery to anyone familiar with the way u-boat communications worked back then.


*Reception of VLF signals can be done with a relatively small antenna, but to transmit a signal that can penetrate the surface of the ocean requires a very large antenna and a powerful transmitter.  Even modern nuclear submarines can't transmit VLF signals.
 
2013-12-19 10:18:25 AM  

spickus: dittybopper: when going to see on a conventional u-boat was pretty much a death sentence

Going to see what?


Usually, the bottom of the Atlantic.
 
2013-12-19 10:18:48 AM  

spickus: DeathCipris: they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.

Really?


Research-wise, they were close to getting the reaction as research started in 1939. Politically, it was not backed and wasn't given any sort of military application.
 
2013-12-19 10:22:39 AM  

DeathCipris: spickus: DeathCipris: they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations

because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.

Really?

Research-wise, they were close to getting the reaction as research started in 1939. Politically, it was not backed and wasn't given any sort of military application.


Sure but what does that have to do with your bolded statement?
 
2013-12-19 10:22:43 AM  
No mention of the Horten flying disc?  The one that Jacobsen claims that the Russians stole and used to stage the Roswell "UFO" crash, along with the work of Joseph Mengele (the "aliens" who were surgically altered children)?
 
2013-12-19 10:23:43 AM  

OldManDownDRoad: DjangoStonereaver: Keep your Steampunk clockwork stuff.

I prefer the WWII era design ethic in most things.

Excellent documentary on that design ethic. Well worth your time.


PunGent: Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.


As the historian George Forty points out: "It was generally assumed that it took five Shermans to knock out one Panther. The German built around 4,500 Panthers. The Americans built 50,000 Shermans."

/may not have been the furstest, but we had the mostest
//yes, I know that quote is most likely spurious


Heh, and add about 60,000 T34s coming from the other direction.

Cool documentary link, btw... thanks.
 
2013-12-19 10:25:21 AM  
www.coolminiornot.com
 
2013-12-19 10:26:24 AM  
Germany had a major technological advantage over much of the world in the late 1930s and got very lucky in certain areas.  France was not using radio systems to coordinate their military efforts and was plagued with leadership problems, the USSR was purging her military left and right, and the UK was willing to sign away other nations to keep "peace in our time".  Timing was key to much of what Germany was able to achieve, but they made some serious R&D mistakes, especially lack of coordination.  The most glaring R&D goofs that I can think of (not counting projects that proved fruitless in hindsight or with disproportionately less impact on the war):

1. Jet fighters - the He 280 was ready for potential deployment much earlier in the war and the original Me 262 design would have been a pure fighter, not a fighter bomber, and could have been deployed about a year earlier.
2. Anti-aircraft Fuses - there were something like 35+ different R&D groups working on this project at one point!  Yet it still took a lot of time to get it operational
3. Synthetic Fuel - Developed in quantity only much later in the war instead of when it might have made a key difference
4. Long-range strategic bombers - with Udet's death this program lost its champion.  Germany had designs in the mid 1930s but they got stalled for political reasons.  Tankograd and the other Siberian factories were thus well out of reach of German air power even at the height of German expansion into Russia
5. Type XXI U-boats - assembly began in 1943, these could have been out much earlier than the end of the war and played havoc with Atlantic supply lines
 
2013-12-19 10:27:47 AM  

spickus: DeathCipris: spickus: DeathCipris: they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.

Really?

Research-wise, they were close to getting the reaction as research started in 1939. Politically, it was not backed and wasn't given any sort of military application.

Sure but what does that have to do with your bolded statement?


The US took documents dealing with Germany's research on nuclear reactors and most of their lead scientists as well (most sought refuge due to the rampant Antisemitism and then the subsequent defeat of the Third Reich). The Manhattan Project had a jump start and built on knowledge attained from back in '39.
 
2013-12-19 10:28:44 AM  

DeathCipris: PunGent: TFA also forgot to mention the Allies came up with an effective jammer for those remote-controlled bombs.  The Luftwaffe had some initial success, then...not so much.

Plus, the Allies were fine-tuning their radar-guided 90mm flak by then.  And getting their AA proximity fuses working.

Now, if the Germans had saved up enough of them to introduce in SIGNIFICANT numbers...they might have extended the war a year.  Heck, they might have forced the first nukes to be used on Germany, rather than Japan. they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.

Of course, they'd have had to cut something else to do it, and since some of their artillery on the East Front was down to five rounds a day in '44, that wouldn't have been an easy choice...not a lot of slack in their economy at that point.

/FTFY


Son of Spam already pointed it out, but again, you might want to re-read some of that history...
 
2013-12-19 10:30:35 AM  

DeathCipris: spickus: DeathCipris: spickus: DeathCipris: they would have used atomic weapons against all of the Allied nations because most of the atomic research garnered by the US was taken from Germany after the defeat of the Third Reich.

Really?

Research-wise, they were close to getting the reaction as research started in 1939. Politically, it was not backed and wasn't given any sort of military application.

Sure but what does that have to do with your bolded statement?

The US took documents dealing with Germany's research on nuclear reactors and most of their lead scientists as well (most sought refuge due to the rampant Antisemitism and then the subsequent defeat of the Third Reich). The Manhattan Project had a jump start and built on knowledge attained from back in '39.


I draw the conclusion that Germany, becoming more and more desperate by the day, having the time to figure out the nuclear reaction, would resolve to using that in the capacity of a weapon. I come to the conclusion, that if the war had went on, Germany would have gotten the atomic bomb first and used it against the various Allied nations.
 
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