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(Business Insider)   The craft beer market may implode soon. Your favorite beer sucks   (businessinsider.com) divider line 84
    More: Obvious, craft beer, Beer Advocate, beans and rice, Brewers Association  
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2769 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Dec 2013 at 5:44 PM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-18 05:36:18 PM
Not as long as Fark exists
 
2013-12-18 05:50:22 PM
Your favorite beer sucks...

If it did that, I'd truly never have to leave the house...
 
2013-12-18 05:50:43 PM
And Apple is about to go down the drain.

You can bemoan the downfall or predict the next big thing repeatedly and only get in trouble if you happen to be an investor. This sort of business analyst has the same hazards as a weather forecaster for getting the 10 day wrong.
 
2013-12-18 05:54:49 PM
Probably from the density of the hops
 
2013-12-18 05:57:37 PM
Poorly run or poorly timed breweries will close. Others will open. It isn't like discerning Americans are going to crawl back to corn lager after tasting real beer.
 
2013-12-18 05:59:44 PM
BTW:  If you haven't tried Firestone's XVII.... holy shiat, that's good.
 
2013-12-18 06:05:17 PM
I'm shocked by this, especially with so many brewers using the guaranteed-for-success naming structure of [adjective] [animal].
 
2013-12-18 06:05:47 PM

netizencain: BTW:  If you haven't tried Firestone's XVII.... holy shiat, that's good.


I really like their Solace.  I only had a few times and then the taphouse ran out and I can't find it anywhere though :(.
 
2013-12-18 06:08:09 PM
My local brewer has been around for 17 years already.  They're not going anywhere.
 
2013-12-18 06:10:55 PM
More randoms for me. One liquor store near me is really good at finding deals for crates of out-of-biz craft beers from all over the country and selling 'em cheap.
 
2013-12-18 06:15:32 PM
It will not implode. . .too many strong brewers out there.
 
2013-12-18 06:15:33 PM

violentsalvation: Poorly run or poorly timed breweries will close. Others will open. It isn't like discerning Americans are going to crawl back to corn lager after tasting real beer.


pretty much, This story about the impending craft-beer-agedon has been circulating for almost a decade now.
 
2013-12-18 06:19:18 PM

Marcus Aurelius: My local brewer has been around for 17 years already.  They're not going anywhere.


Their growler prices are awesome.

Now I want to go get a refill.

Silverback maybe....
 
2013-12-18 06:26:38 PM

netizencain: BTW:  If you haven't tried Firestone's XVII.... holy shiat, that's good.


I haven't been able to find it : (

However I do have a XVI aging...and is now in the fridge....

/Trying to hold out to friday
 
2013-12-18 06:27:29 PM
According to my aunt, who is a bigwig in the local government, Stone Brewery is building its own hotel next to the brewery. I don't know what that says about a brewing bubble.
 
2013-12-18 06:31:51 PM

ghall3: netizencain: BTW:  If you haven't tried Firestone's XVII.... holy shiat, that's good.

I haven't been able to find it : (

However I do have a XVI aging...and is now in the fridge....

/Trying to hold out to friday


Bought 6 bottles of 17... found a bar that has a keg that they will tap on new years.  HELL YA!
 
2013-12-18 06:32:58 PM

Wellon Dowd: According to my aunt, who is a bigwig in the local government, Stone Brewery is building its own hotel next to the brewery. I don't know what that says about a brewing bubble.


That would be awesome. I visited there when I was in CA for work but couldn't get completely plastered  drink as my hotel was 20mi away....
I love their growler parking only spots out front.
 
2013-12-18 06:35:39 PM

netizencain: Bought 6 bottles of 17... found a bar that has a keg that they will tap on new years.  HELL YA!


Being close to the source helps, and I'm jealous, all we get in PA (that I can find so far) are their standard beers, which while great, aren't the anniversary or the Double DBA, another favorite of mine.

Thank god the Goose Island limiteds make it out here at least.
 
2013-12-18 06:36:16 PM
I read this article a couple of days ago and frankly I don't see anything in it that suggests what this headline says.  Small craft breweries will open and close just like any other business.  The stamp that small craft brewers have left, however, is too significant for it ever to go away.
 
2013-12-18 06:39:40 PM
In the last 2 years, something like 6 craft brewers have opened in Dayton, OH and surrounding burbs.  Plus at least one national chain that brews on site.  There will, of course, be a bust after the boom.

/which means my buddies and I can snatch up equipment and real estate at the bankruptcy auctions
//contract brewing for restaurants and bars is where the money is
///just need to keep your ego in check
 
2013-12-18 06:42:50 PM
My favorite beer is Bud Light. When all you pretentious beer-snob hipsters have nothing to drink because your favorite mocha-flavored IPA stout from the Douchebag region of France has gone under, and you're too good to drink horse-piss beer, I'll be shiat-faced on cheap beer. CHEERS!
 
2013-12-18 06:44:34 PM

Sushi and the Banshees: I'm shocked by this, especially with so many brewers using the guaranteed-for-success naming structure of [adjective] [animal].


Hey! You will not rag on my Effervescent Marmot.

/you've never heard of it
 
2013-12-18 06:50:14 PM

Sushi and the Banshees: I'm shocked by this, especially with so many brewers using the guaranteed-for-success naming structure of [adjective] [animal].


I'm going to start White Elephant Brewing.  The beer so obscure that nobody ever mentions it.  Hipsters will buy it in droves.
 
2013-12-18 06:56:41 PM
Hotlinked image:


1.bp.blogspot.com

River Horse Tripel Horse, my personal favorite.  Brewed down the road from me.  I lack the vocabulary of a beer snob so here's my review: it's farking tasty and will hit pretty hard.  I drink it both cold and warm and I'm not sure which way I like more.
 
2013-12-18 06:57:27 PM
Sounds like....

*puts on sunglasses*

They are worried about a beer bubble

cdn2.sbnation.com
 
2013-12-18 07:01:44 PM

wildcardjack: And Apple is about to go down the drain.

You can bemoan the downfall or predict the next big thing repeatedly and only get in trouble if you happen to be an investor. This sort of business analyst has the same hazards as a weather forecaster for getting the 10 day wrong.


I heard that bitcoins are going to crash and burn any day now.
 
2013-12-18 07:21:29 PM
There are certainly a huge amount of bad breweries opening up, and plenty of them won't make it.   Part of the issue is that people that love beer enough to want to *make* beer live in areas with too many breweries.  That doesn't just mean that there's more competition in terms of "number of breweries" but also in terms of "quality of beer":  if people want to open a brewery in a space with a lot of good, established breweries they have to be very well-made beers, or people will eventually pick up on the flaws.

And, by the way, getting used to brewing on a large scale compared to brewing on a homebrew scale takes time...your first few batches won't be perfect, and most breweries don't have the money to 'practice' before they open.  So you get a new brewery whose first few batches suck, and that impression lingers for a long time.

Look at the Denver/Boulder area in Colorado.  There are so many new breweries that I can't even keep track of them anymore...and a lot of them are not very good.
 
2013-12-18 07:29:32 PM

NegativeChirality: There are certainly a huge amount of bad breweries opening up, and plenty of them won't make it.   Part of the issue is that people that love beer enough to want to *make* beer live in areas with too many breweries.  That doesn't just mean that there's more competition in terms of "number of breweries" but also in terms of "quality of beer":  if people want to open a brewery in a space with a lot of good, established breweries they have to be very well-made beers, or people will eventually pick up on the flaws.

And, by the way, getting used to brewing on a large scale compared to brewing on a homebrew scale takes time...your first few batches won't be perfect, and most breweries don't have the money to 'practice' before they open.  So you get a new brewery whose first few batches suck, and that impression lingers for a long time.

Look at the Denver/Boulder area in Colorado.  There are so many new breweries that I can't even keep track of them anymore...and a lot of them are not very good.


Oregon is getting more and more, and... there are some stinkers in the bunch.

Personally, I was thinking about it, but rationality (and lack of funds) saved me.

Now though, I think I'd rather open a distillery.  THAT would be fun.

Alas... no funds or experience.
 
2013-12-18 07:33:22 PM

ghall3: Marcus Aurelius: My local brewer has been around for 17 years already.  They're not going anywhere.

Their growler prices are awesome.

Now I want to go get a refill.

Silverback maybe....


My only issue with the growler is that it's always looking for the next refill.  Just thinking about it is making me thirsty.
 
2013-12-18 07:36:59 PM
meat0918:
Oregon is getting more and more, and... there are some stinkers in the bunch.

Personally, I was thinking about it, but rationality (and lack of funds) saved me.

Now though, I think I'd rather open a distillery.  THAT would be fun.

Alas... no funds or experience.


Big problem with distilling:  making vodka doesn't take much time.  Making whisk(e)y takes years.

There are certainly good, small, craft distilleries popping up, but...man, that's not a business I would ever want to get involved in.   Too much risk, too long of a time-scale.  People probably don't care about your artisinal vodka.   They might care about your artisinal whiskey made with whatever obscure grains the distiller could scrounge up...but that's 2-3 years out, minimum (check out Feisty Spirits, in Fort Collins, CO--their website claims they've made single-malts from grains I had to look up on wikipedia)....
 
2013-12-18 07:45:51 PM

NegativeChirality: meat0918:
Oregon is getting more and more, and... there are some stinkers in the bunch.

Personally, I was thinking about it, but rationality (and lack of funds) saved me.

Now though, I think I'd rather open a distillery.  THAT would be fun.

Alas... no funds or experience.

Big problem with distilling:  making vodka doesn't take much time.  Making whisk(e)y takes years.

There are certainly good, small, craft distilleries popping up, but...man, that's not a business I would ever want to get involved in.   Too much risk, too long of a time-scale.  People probably don't care about your artisinal vodka.   They might care about your artisinal whiskey made with whatever obscure grains the distiller could scrounge up...but that's 2-3 years out, minimum (check out Feisty Spirits, in Fort Collins, CO--their website claims they've made single-malts from grains I had to look up on wikipedia)....


I think that's why some are selling moonshine (where legal) to pad their bottom line while they wait for it to age.

I was thinking more along the lines of specialty spirits anyways, a Chambord clone for instance with Oregon blackberries, and a hazelnut liqueur, that sort of thing, maybe even a regional brandy.

Leave the vodka to the big boys.
 
2013-12-18 07:57:18 PM
The best beer gets cooked up in my garage, or occasionally my kitchen.

You've probably never heard of it.
 
2013-12-18 08:03:01 PM
Good.  I can get better beer for cheap then.
 
2013-12-18 08:04:07 PM

NegativeChirality: Big problem with distilling: making vodka doesn't take much time. Making whisk(e)y takes years.  There are certainly good, small, craft distilleries popping up, but...man, that's not a business I would ever want to get involved in. Too much risk, too long of a time-scale. People probably don't care about your artisinal vodka. They might care about your artisinal whiskey made with whatever obscure grains the distiller could scrounge up...but that's 2-3 years out, minimum (check out Feisty Spirits, in Fort Collins, CO--their website claims they've made single-malts from grains I had to look up on wikipedia)....


Yup.  A lot of the craft whiskey shops seem to be going the route of using small barrels in order to get their product out in a couple of years.  Then over time, they shift to larger barrels and slower aging.  But there is that very steep learning curve at the beginning that can end up burning a lot of time and money if you don't know what you're doing.
 
2013-12-18 08:06:08 PM

Marcus Aurelius: My local brewer has been around for 17 years already.  They're not going anywhere.


You sir are a alcoholic.
 
2013-12-18 08:07:46 PM
I like beer
 
2013-12-18 08:17:10 PM

meat0918: a hazelnut liqueur


Liqueurs are actually really fun to make.  You don't need to distill anything since they're just an infusion.  Most utilize neutral grain spirits as their base, which are fairly cheap at liquor stores.  Unlike whiskey which takes years to age, the longest mellowing time for something like a lemoncello is 6-12 months.

One trick I found is that you can substitute Everclear diluted with distilled water for vodka.  Since most states apply a spirit tax based on volume as oppose to alcohol content, you can save a few bucks that way.
 
2013-12-18 08:24:55 PM

EnderX: Marcus Aurelius: My local brewer has been around for 17 years already.  They're not going anywhere.

You sir are a alcoholic.


I will drink to that.  As soon as I refill my growler.
 
2013-12-18 08:27:07 PM
If you live north of Seattle:

http://www.special-brews.com/
 
2013-12-18 08:28:36 PM
So there were 2011 breweries when the population of the US was 59 million in 1887.  The population of US is 313.9 million with 2538 breweries. That mean that if the 1887 ratio was the maximum there should be room for approximately 8162 more before we hit a similar per capita. And craft beer only account for 10% of the market share.

In other words, I'm not worried.
 
2013-12-18 08:42:42 PM

Asako: White Elephant Brewing


Too late   http://www.pubquest.com/index.php?option=com_sobi2&sobi2Task=sobi2Deta ils&catid=10&sobi2Id=25122&Itemid=3">http://www.pubquest.com/index.ph p?option=com_sobi2&sobi2Task=sobi2Deta ils&catid=10&sobi2Id=25122&Itemid=3
 
2013-12-18 08:47:56 PM

Omahawg: I like beer


It makes me a jolly good fellow.

/Loved me some Millstream when I was up in Iowa
//Need to find a local brew to love here in Georgia
 
2013-12-18 08:49:08 PM
Well, it seems all the major points have been mentioned already.

The most significant one is markets expand and contract, with the underfunded or poorly-marketed ones failing first, giving rise to additional players with newer ideas, better locations, or more-skilled brew masters.

We went through this 20 years ago (hate to break it to ya' you young FARKERS--there was a micro-brew boom before the current one), and the strong ones will survive and thrive.

Hell, we have small breweries and brew pubs here in Milwaukee that are almost 30 years old.  And some that opened last year.

CSB:
I work in the Third Ward near bars about a hundred years old--a few started and owned by Schlitz and Pabst back in the day.  One could make the case they were the original brew pubs.  Obviously different owners now, but all the small-brewery hubbub sort of puts into perspective how it used to be--small breweries serving the local community and fighting for that extra distribution to one or two more saloons down the road a piece.  What a great era we're in these last few decades.
 
2013-12-18 08:51:45 PM
I can huff paint and get just as messed up for a whole lot cheaper.  Don't try to class it up, drinking craft beer with 8% alcohol content is just a faster way to getting shiathoused.   Nothing wrong with that, but don't get all preachy to me about it.
 
2013-12-18 08:58:53 PM
I hope these guys don't "implode", but, given how strong the microbrew scene is in Quebec I have nothing to worry about.

The best trappist-style beer available outside Belgium and better than most Belgian beers, IMO.

legalbeer.com
 
2013-12-18 09:33:01 PM

Marcus Aurelius: EnderX: Marcus Aurelius: My local brewer has been around for 17 years already.  They're not going anywhere.

You sir are a alcoholic.

I will drink to that.  As soon as I refill my growler.


I'll drink to that.
 
2013-12-18 09:35:30 PM

fickenchucker: Well, it seems all the major points have been mentioned already.

The most significant one is markets expand and contract, with the underfunded or poorly-marketed ones failing first, giving rise to additional players with newer ideas, better locations, or more-skilled brew masters.

We went through this 20 years ago (hate to break it to ya' you young FARKERS--there was a micro-brew boom before the current one), and the strong ones will survive and thrive.

Hell, we have small breweries and brew pubs here in Milwaukee that are almost 30 years old.  And some that opened last year.

CSB:
I work in the Third Ward near bars about a hundred years old--a few started and owned by Schlitz and Pabst back in the day.  One could make the case they were the original brew pubs.  Obviously different owners now, but all the small-brewery hubbub sort of puts into perspective how it used to be--small breweries serving the local community and fighting for that extra distribution to one or two more saloons down the road a piece.  What a great era we're in these last few decades.


I think Prohibition all but destroyed what was once a vibrant local brewery and distilling culture, then the massive corporates that formed after WW2 for food and beverage production didn't help.
 
2013-12-18 09:42:31 PM
This article brought to you by AB InBev.

/wishing I could get New Glarus beers south of the Cheese Curtain
//then again, New Glarus Brewing is smart enough not to overexpand
 
2013-12-18 09:57:04 PM
How has this not turned into a complete self-stroke-fest about how "my craft beer, no one outside of a 3 block radius of the brewery has heard of, is better than your craft beer"; as well as an excuse to bash on IPAs?
 
2013-12-18 10:11:38 PM

GoodHomer: I hope these guys don't "implode", but, given how strong the microbrew scene is in Quebec I have nothing to worry about.

The best trappist-style beer available outside Belgium and better than most Belgian beers, IMO.

[legalbeer.com image 794x596]


Is that 16.5 % ? Hmm, time to see if my distributor has added them. Then again, I am out of shelf space, but my customers love Unibroue / Chimay / any other Belgian / belgian style so I will have to kill something.I know- bye bye stella cidre- 3 months and sold 5 bottles.out of the 15 in the case.... yeah, tough call to make.Not.
 
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