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(Washington Post)   In order for Obamacare to work as intended, it needs to average 200,000 signups a week from here on out. Impossible? Turns out that California alone is now seeing over 100,000 signups per week   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 86
    More: Followup, obamacare, health care reform, admission note, Martin O'Malley  
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1057 clicks; posted to Politics » on 18 Dec 2013 at 5:06 PM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-18 02:29:00 PM
So that would extrapolate out to something like 1,000,000 a week for the country? Seems unlikely, but a good sign.
 
2013-12-18 02:57:25 PM
My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.
 
2013-12-18 03:19:54 PM

make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.


You think its ok now.

Wait till 0bama BOB claims the right of  prima nocta.

It's in OBMACARE, Glenn Beck Said so.
 
2013-12-18 03:27:39 PM

Heliovdrake: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

You think its ok now.

Wait till 0bama BOB claims the right of  prima nocta.

It's in OBMACARE, Glenn Beck Said so.


OH NO NOT GLENN BECK
 
2013-12-18 03:31:53 PM
Glenn Beck is a fictional character created and played by noted liberal, gay, actor Oliver Thatch as part of his negative utopia based performance art.
 
2013-12-18 03:33:48 PM

alaric3: Glenn Beck is a fictional character created and played by noted liberal, gay, actor Oliver Thatch as part of his negative utopia based performance art.


The name is Alfred Peachous.
 
2013-12-18 03:40:51 PM

DamnYankees: alaric3: Glenn Beck is a fictional character created and played by noted liberal, gay, actor Oliver Thatch as part of his negative utopia based performance art.

The name is Alfred Peachous.


He switched his name in 1990 for some reason.
 
2013-12-18 04:02:33 PM
If Obamacare works as predicted, it is still considered a failure by the GOP and the worse thing since malaria.

Whatever happens, the GOP should excuses themselves from any questions/discussion as to the relative success of the program.
 
2013-12-18 04:36:55 PM

DamnYankees: So that would extrapolate out to something like 1,000,000 a week for the country? Seems unlikely, but a good sign.


Linear extrapolation would actually make it about 700,000 a week, since California has about 15% of the uninsured population of the country (12% of the total population).  That's probably still an unlikely number, since the adoption rate in California is likely going to be higher than in many other places: according to a site being maintained by a bunch of DKos folks, California is at about 14% of target while the country as a whole is at about 10%.  So, count 2/3 of that 700k figure and you're at about 450k-500k.  Even if only half of that is real, it's still over the needed amount.
 
2013-12-18 05:04:28 PM

make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.


Today's Mountain Democrat has a big whiney story about how completely screwed up Covered CA's website is

/it should also be noted that the Mountain Democrat is the most inaptly named newspaper in the world
//and not because it isn't in the mountains
 
2013-12-18 05:09:15 PM

Heliovdrake: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

You think its ok now.

Wait till 0bama BOB claims the right of  prima nocta.

It's in OBMACARE, Glenn Beck Said so.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-12-18 05:12:56 PM
Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.
 
2013-12-18 05:14:58 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

Today's Mountain Democrat has a big whiney story about how completely screwed up Covered CA's website is

/it should also be noted that the Mountain Democrat is the most inaptly named newspaper in the world
//and not because it isn't in the mountains


Ah, the Mountain Democrat.  Back in the day ("the day" being the early 80's) I remember it being a damn fine local paper.  The last time I was visiting P'ville I was shocked to see what a useless rag it had become.
 
2013-12-18 05:17:22 PM
I'll be signing up within a month, so that's one down.
 
2013-12-18 05:18:43 PM

someonelse: I'll be signing up within a month, so that's one down.


Yeah well I won't be signing up, so there!

I don't need to.
 
2013-12-18 05:19:21 PM

make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.


i got an email today from an anti obamacare guy saying the coveredCA isn't working since folks who signed up aren't getting bills yet. YMMV
 
2013-12-18 05:20:20 PM
Is that what they want?

/ Because thats how you get ants...
 
2013-12-18 05:21:08 PM

ducklord666: MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

Today's Mountain Democrat has a big whiney story about how completely screwed up Covered CA's website is

/it should also be noted that the Mountain Democrat is the most inaptly named newspaper in the world
//and not because it isn't in the mountains

Ah, the Mountain Democrat.  Back in the day ("the day" being the early 80's) I remember it being a damn fine local paper.  The last time I was visiting P'ville I was shocked to see what a useless rag it had become.


Yeah... they went full bagger about 5 years ago

/no idea why
 
2013-12-18 05:21:30 PM

BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.


Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.
 
2013-12-18 05:27:21 PM

mrshowrules: DamnYankees: alaric3: Glenn Beck is a fictional character created and played by noted liberal, gay, actor Oliver Thatch as part of his negative utopia based performance art.

The name is Alfred Peachous.

He switched his name in 1990 for some reason.


Hmmmm. I wonder why?
 
2013-12-18 05:27:37 PM

obenchainr: DamnYankees: So that would extrapolate out to something like 1,000,000 a week for the country? Seems unlikely, but a good sign.

Linear extrapolation would actually make it about 700,000 a week, since California has about 15% of the uninsured population of the country (12% of the total population).  That's probably still an unlikely number, since the adoption rate in California is likely going to be higher than in many other places: according to a site being maintained by a bunch of DKos folks, California is at about 14% of target while the country as a whole is at about 10%.  So, count 2/3 of that 700k figure and you're at about 450k-500k.  Even if only half of that is real, it's still over the needed amount.


The uninsured aren't the only people who would be using exchanges. Unless, that is, you count the people who have had their policies canceled recently as among the "uninsured". Even then, people with existing grandfathered health plans would be expected to check the exchanges in search of a better deal, and some of them will no doubt switch over.

The thing with these stories is, nobody every says what "enrolled" actually means. Did everyone so designated select a plan and go thru the checkout process, or did they put one in the cart and then walk away? The only true measure will be when we get the stats on how many people have actually paid their first premium to an insurer. Given that the Obama administration went out of its way to admonish insurers to extend coverage to people who supposedly have signed up but haven't yet paid the first premium, I'm guessing there are as-yet-unrevealed problems.
 
2013-12-18 05:27:49 PM
I agree with the Tea Party on this one. It might not work so we should try to do nothing and make it not work because otherwise it does work and then we're giving people healthcare and they'll come to expect it.
 
2013-12-18 05:28:26 PM

Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.


Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.
 
2013-12-18 05:29:07 PM

mrshowrules: If Obamacare works as predicted, it is still considered a failure by the GOP and the worse thing since malaria.

Whatever happens, the GOP should excuses themselves from any questions/discussion as to the relative success of the program.


Don't forget to look for the positives.

Malaria brought us the gin and tonic.
 
2013-12-18 05:29:54 PM

jjorsett: obenchainr: DamnYankees: So that would extrapolate out to something like 1,000,000 a week for the country? Seems unlikely, but a good sign.

Linear extrapolation would actually make it about 700,000 a week, since California has about 15% of the uninsured population of the country (12% of the total population).  That's probably still an unlikely number, since the adoption rate in California is likely going to be higher than in many other places: according to a site being maintained by a bunch of DKos folks, California is at about 14% of target while the country as a whole is at about 10%.  So, count 2/3 of that 700k figure and you're at about 450k-500k.  Even if only half of that is real, it's still over the needed amount.

The uninsured aren't the only people who would be using exchanges. Unless, that is, you count the people who have had their policies canceled recently as among the "uninsured". Even then, people with existing grandfathered health plans would be expected to check the exchanges in search of a better deal, and some of them will no doubt switch over.

The thing with these stories is, nobody every says what "enrolled" actually means. Did everyone so designated select a plan and go thru the checkout process, or did they put one in the cart and then walk away? The only true measure will be when we get the stats on how many people have actually paid their first premium to an insurer. Given that the Obama administration went out of its way to admonish insurers to extend coverage to people who supposedly have signed up but haven't yet paid the first premium, I'm guessing there are as-yet-unrevealed problems.


Well, if you want those numbers, you'll have to wait until after January 11th for them since basically every health insurance company just voluntarily extended the payment deadline to January 10th for coverage retroactive to the beginning of the year.
 
2013-12-18 05:31:14 PM
I'm still hoping for a collapse so that we can get some actual reform.
 
2013-12-18 05:31:23 PM
Thank You, P. Farty Butthole
 
2013-12-18 05:31:23 PM

BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.


BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.


And all of the estimates of needing 40% of enrollees to be younger people treated those people exactly the same too. Is that a problem?
 
2013-12-18 05:32:01 PM
Is this the Federal exchange that needs them, or the whole thing overall?

CA is doing their own thing.

And Oregon is prepping to sue Oracle for breach of contract on failing to deliver.  It's a giant clusterfark, and really, REALLY shouldn't be given Oregon started early, and IT'S FARKING ORACLE!  They live and breathe this shiat.

I'm not saying sabotage, but that's the rumor I'm hearing given how spectacularly it is failing.
 
2013-12-18 05:32:04 PM

BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.


Is there a reason they should treat them differently? The study is concerned with age, not current health status.
 
2013-12-18 05:33:23 PM

meat0918: Is this the Federal exchange that needs them, or the whole thing overall?


I think its the whole thing. I've never seen any estimates which are only limited to the federal exchange.
 
2013-12-18 05:33:31 PM

Serious Black: BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.

BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.

And all of the estimates of needing 40% of enrollees to be younger people treated those people exactly the same too. Is that a problem?


Depends in their methodology. They better have accounted for adverse selection somehow.
 
2013-12-18 05:33:58 PM

Serious Black: Well, if you want those numbers, you'll have to wait until after January 11th for them since basically every health insurance company just voluntarily extended the payment deadline to January 10th for coverage retroactive to the beginning of the year.


Hush now. You know dang well that demanding definitions based on future enrollment dates is perfectly acceptable, and until we have those future numbers, it means that the whole thing is a failure today.
 
2013-12-18 05:34:14 PM

meat0918: Is this the Federal exchange that needs them, or the whole thing overall?

CA is doing their own thing.

And Oregon is prepping to sue Oracle for breach of contract on failing to deliver.  It's a giant clusterfark, and really, REALLY shouldn't be given Oregon started early, and IT'S FARKING ORACLE!  They live and breathe this shiat.

I'm not saying sabotage, but that's the rumor I'm hearing given how spectacularly it is failing.


Oregon purposely tried to make their exchange a very thorough system that would allow people to sign up for basically every program they are eligible for, including but not limited to SNAP and housing assistance. Oracle definitely should have delivered a system that was modestly functional, but their degree of difficulty was a lot higher than most other states.
 
2013-12-18 05:34:52 PM

Girl Sailor: I agree with the Tea Party on this one. It might not work so we should try to do nothing and make it not work because otherwise it does work and then we're giving people healthcare and they'll come to expect it.


As Rumsfeld said, "there are known unknowns and unknown unknowns, so why take a chance?"
 
2013-12-18 05:35:53 PM

Curious: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

i got an email today from an anti obamacare guy saying the coveredCA isn't working since folks who signed up aren't getting bills yet. YMMV


I signed up using CoveredCA earlier in the month, and I just got my bill over the weekend. Looks like it's right on track to me.
 
2013-12-18 05:37:36 PM

The Martian Manhandler: Curious: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

i got an email today from an anti obamacare guy saying the coveredCA isn't working since folks who signed up aren't getting bills yet. YMMV

I signed up using CoveredCA earlier in the month, and I just got my bill over the weekend. Looks like it's right on track to me.


You're doing it wrong. See, you allowed time to pass between when you signed up and when you received your bill. That was your mistake.  If we don't allow for the passage of time, then that guy was totally right.
 
2013-12-18 05:38:02 PM

BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.


Every time the goalposts get reset and the ball makes it into the endzone, someone gets out the tractor and moves the goalposts, replants the field and changes the sport.
 
2013-12-18 05:40:14 PM

Serious Black: meat0918: Is this the Federal exchange that needs them, or the whole thing overall?

CA is doing their own thing.

And Oregon is prepping to sue Oracle for breach of contract on failing to deliver.  It's a giant clusterfark, and really, REALLY shouldn't be given Oregon started early, and IT'S FARKING ORACLE!  They live and breathe this shiat.

I'm not saying sabotage, but that's the rumor I'm hearing given how spectacularly it is failing.

Oregon purposely tried to make their exchange a very thorough system that would allow people to sign up for basically every program they are eligible for, including but not limited to SNAP and housing assistance. Oracle definitely should have delivered a system that was modestly functional, but their degree of difficulty was a lot higher than most other states.


There is that.  Kitzhaber had a vision of a one stop shop, and really it is a good idea, but damn, get the one important portion working first, rather than have the whole thing crap out.

I was able to get an estimate at least, even though I am required by my employer to participate in the company plan.

Company plan is pretty damn good and cheap compared to what I found on the exchange, except for the preventative care.  Ours is grandfathered.  The nearest thing covered is mammograms in Salem.  I'm a dude in Eugene.  The prostate screenings are covered if I get up to a Woodburn doctor's office, which is about 1.5 hours away.

Well visits for children still aren't covered.  Vaccines are though finally.

It's so goddamn confusing and convoluted, it's almost as if the insurance company doesn't want you to actually see a doctor....
 
2013-12-18 05:40:52 PM

The Martian Manhandler: Curious: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

i got an email today from an anti obamacare guy saying the coveredCA isn't working since folks who signed up aren't getting bills yet. YMMV

I signed up using CoveredCA earlier in the month, and I just got my bill over the weekend. Looks like it's right on track to me.


Yes, and in 6 months we'll hear people saying that because everyone wasn't given a gold-plated unicorn with their first appointment, CoveredCA isn't working.
 
2013-12-18 05:41:55 PM

meat0918: Serious Black: meat0918: Is this the Federal exchange that needs them, or the whole thing overall?

CA is doing their own thing.

And Oregon is prepping to sue Oracle for breach of contract on failing to deliver.  It's a giant clusterfark, and really, REALLY shouldn't be given Oregon started early, and IT'S FARKING ORACLE!  They live and breathe this shiat.

I'm not saying sabotage, but that's the rumor I'm hearing given how spectacularly it is failing.

Oregon purposely tried to make their exchange a very thorough system that would allow people to sign up for basically every program they are eligible for, including but not limited to SNAP and housing assistance. Oracle definitely should have delivered a system that was modestly functional, but their degree of difficulty was a lot higher than most other states.

There is that.  Kitzhaber had a vision of a one stop shop, and really it is a good idea, but damn, get the one important portion working first, rather than have the whole thing crap out.

I was able to get an estimate at least, even though I am required by my employer to participate in the company plan.

Company plan is pretty damn good and cheap compared to what I found on the exchange, except for the preventative care.  Ours is grandfathered.  The nearest thing covered is mammograms in Salem.  I'm a dude in Eugene.  The prostate screenings are covered if I get up to a Woodburn doctor's office, which is about 1.5 hours away.

Well visits for children still aren't covered.  Vaccines are though finally.

It's so goddamn confusing and convoluted, it's almost as if the insurance company doesn't want you to actually see a doctor....


files.myopera.com
 
2013-12-18 05:43:39 PM

BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.

BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.

And all of the estimates of needing 40% of enrollees to be younger people treated those people exactly the same too. Is that a problem?

Depends in their methodology. They better have accounted for adverse selection some ...


Isn't the point of the entire study to figure out how adverse selection will affect the ACA? There's no reason to "account" for it; it's a fundamental part of what's being studied.
 
2013-12-18 05:47:11 PM

qorkfiend: Is there a reason they should treat them differently? The study is concerned with age, not current health status.


No.  See if you're not a "young person" you're a cancer patient who needs 24-hour intensive care.  There is no in-between.
 
2013-12-18 05:48:45 PM

qorkfiend: BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.

Is there a reason they should treat them differently? The study is concerned with age, not current health status.


Age is a proxy for current health status.
 
2013-12-18 05:50:42 PM

meat0918: It's so goddamn confusing and convoluted, it's almost as if the insurance company doesn't want you to actually see a doctor....


And since they also don't want you getting sick, it's something of a Catch-22. (Or, rewatch Alan Grayson's famous summation of the status quo ante of health insurance.)

Any actuary would tell them they come out ahead if they FORCE regular doc visits on everyone compared with rolling the dice and paying out when some Lucky Ducky gets a slow-burn cancer (pancreatic kills too quickly to really bleed InsurCos), but they'd prefer to play both sides of the ledger - don't get sick; but for god's sake if you do, don't see anyone but your GP (and definitely don't schedule procedures or specialist appointments or follow-up appointments).
 
2013-12-18 05:51:27 PM
I've chosen to believe it's going to fail if it doesn't get at least two million people from Montana to sign up.
 
2013-12-18 05:51:32 PM
I would love to see the numbers on how many poor republicans / tea party members are signing up.
 
2013-12-18 05:54:18 PM

obenchainr: The Martian Manhandler: Curious: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

i got an email today from an anti obamacare guy saying the coveredCA isn't working since folks who signed up aren't getting bills yet. YMMV

I signed up using CoveredCA earlier in the month, and I just got my bill over the weekend. Looks like it's right on track to me.

Yes, and in 6 months we'll hear people saying that because everyone wasn't given a gold-plated unicorn with their first appointment, CoveredCA isn't working.


The fact that some of you are getting gold-plated unicorns is completely unfair.  We have no such promises here in Washington.
 
2013-12-18 05:55:46 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: ducklord666: MaudlinMutantMollusk: make me some tea: My wife signed up with a plan through CoveredCA yesterday. She's pleased with the results.

Today's Mountain Democrat has a big whiney story about how completely screwed up Covered CA's website is

/it should also be noted that the Mountain Democrat is the most inaptly named newspaper in the world
//and not because it isn't in the mountains

Ah, the Mountain Democrat.  Back in the day ("the day" being the early 80's) I remember it being a damn fine local paper.  The last time I was visiting P'ville I was shocked to see what a useless rag it had become.

Yeah... they went full bagger about 5 years ago

/no idea why


At least your small town paper was good once upon a time. The paper of record for the other P'ville in California (Porterville), has always been crap. There's a good reason the 'Porterville Recorder' is more commonly known around town as 'The Distorter'
 
2013-12-18 05:56:35 PM

BMFPitt: qorkfiend: BMFPitt: Serious Black: BMFPitt: Stupid metric is stupid.

The majority of sign ups will be in the weeks before the deadline.

There may or may not be enough young healthy people signing up to prevent the system from collapsing, but there is no reason to expect an even distribution.

Unless every young, healthy person skipped out on getting insurance, the markets aren't going to completely collapse. KFF determined that if the proportion of people under 35 signing up for insurance held steady with what current proportions are (about 25%), insurance premiums would skyrocket by an astonishing...2.4%. That's not pocket change, but it's not close to triggering a death spiral either.

Based on a quick glance, your study treats a young person who hasn't seen a doctor since their physical for high school football the same as someone who is pregnant and recovering from cancer.

Is there a reason they should treat them differently? The study is concerned with age, not current health status.

Age is a proxy for current health status.


I don't believe the Current Population Survey collects information on current health status. Do you have a suggestion for a comprehensive, national data source that reveals what medical issues people have had in the recent past and also includes their income and job status?
 
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