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(Zero Hedge)   Ice discovered in Antarctica   (zerohedge.com) divider line 17
    More: Interesting, Antarctica, De Beers, resource extraction, British Antarctic Survey, Bain & Co., volcanic rocks, ice, legal defense fund  
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2903 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Dec 2013 at 9:08 AM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-18 08:39:31 AM
Great, now you can expect all the indigenous people of the region to start losing their limbs once DeBeers gets there.
 
2013-12-18 09:16:27 AM
Sounds like a talking heads song...
 
2013-12-18 09:32:03 AM
You can grow diamonds in a lab with cow farts and hydrogen.

They are not rare, they are only made expensive via market manipulation.
 
2013-12-18 09:48:54 AM
All of a sudden, this makes sense.
 
2013-12-18 10:04:35 AM
"So, with very few big new diamond mines having been developed in recent years "

De Beers works pretty hard to avoid flooding the market.
 
2013-12-18 10:14:08 AM

Dust: Great, now you can expect all the indigenous people of the region to start losing their limbs once DeBeers gets there.


Pengiuns cant fly anyway, they wont miss them.
 
2013-12-18 10:45:25 AM
The problem is that the frozen continent is protected from mining for decades under an international treaty

How is this a problem?

The treaty, entering into force in 1961 and currently having 50 signatory nations

Oh - only 50 nations have signed.
upload.wikimedia.org
The ones in grey didn't sign any treaty.
 
2013-12-18 10:48:03 AM

gfid: The problem is that the frozen continent is protected from mining for decades under an international treaty

How is this a problem?

The treaty, entering into force in 1961 and currently having 50 signatory nations

Oh - only 50 nations have signed.
[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x176]
The ones in grey didn't sign any treaty.


Those happen to be the nations capable of international mineral exploitation, by and large.  Of the grey nations, the only one that jumps to mind as having previous work with that is Saudi Arabia.
 
2013-12-18 10:49:16 AM

Dust: Great, now you can expect all the indigenous people of the region to start losing their limbs once DeBeers gets there.


The indigenous inhabitants walk funny, too.

www.penguin-pictures.net
 
2013-12-18 10:59:57 AM
www.atariguide.com

Is that where it ended up?
 
2013-12-18 11:45:35 AM

ikanreed: gfid: The problem is that the frozen continent is protected from mining for decades under an international treaty

How is this a problem?

The treaty, entering into force in 1961 and currently having 50 signatory nations

Oh - only 50 nations have signed.
[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x176]
The ones in grey didn't sign any treaty.

Those happen to be the nations capable of international mineral exploitation, by and large.  Of the grey nations, the only one that jumps to mind as having previous work with that is Saudi Arabia.


I think a lot of the Saudi oil extraction is done with foreign expertise. They certainly don't have much experience with mineral extraction outside of petroleum and natural gas.
 
2013-12-18 11:57:32 AM

Tellurium: ikanreed: gfid: The problem is that the frozen continent is protected from mining for decades under an international treaty

How is this a problem?

The treaty, entering into force in 1961 and currently having 50 signatory nations

Oh - only 50 nations have signed.
[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x176]
The ones in grey didn't sign any treaty.

Those happen to be the nations capable of international mineral exploitation, by and large.  Of the grey nations, the only one that jumps to mind as having previous work with that is Saudi Arabia.

I think a lot of the Saudi oil extraction is done with foreign expertise. They certainly don't have much experience with mineral extraction outside of petroleum and natural gas.


Is foreign expertise bound by national treaties though? I suspect that Saudi Arabia could hire foreign contractors to do the work, as long as on the books the business is out of Saudi Arabia. Of course, there would be international pressure, but to what end really?
 
2013-12-18 12:33:44 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: [www.atariguide.com image 185x244]

Is that where it ended up?


man, I haven't seen one of those 30 years . . . good times.

\\ C64 ftw
 
2013-12-18 12:53:56 PM
De Beers !

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-12-18 02:17:03 PM
i1168.photobucket.com

"But we have treaties..."

"Ink on a page!"
 
2013-12-18 04:51:01 PM

ikanreed: gfid: The problem is that the frozen continent is protected from mining for decades under an international treaty

How is this a problem?

The treaty, entering into force in 1961 and currently having 50 signatory nations

Oh - only 50 nations have signed.
[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x176]
The ones in grey didn't sign any treaty.

Those happen to be the nations capable of international mineral exploitation, by and large.  Of the grey nations, the only one that jumps to mind as having previous work with that is Saudi Arabia.


If you own a company that you want to rape the Antarctic just open an office in the gray country and send your rape equipment to the Antarctic.
 
2013-12-18 07:15:17 PM
Kimberlite doesnt always indicate diamonds, im sitting in kimberlite and there is no diamonds in here.
 
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