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(TreeHugger)   Today's conspiracy theory: It doesn't matter what product you buy at the grocery store, the money all gets funneled back to the same company   (treehugger.com) divider line 76
    More: Weird, C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America, supermarkets  
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5109 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Dec 2013 at 4:45 AM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-18 03:06:10 AM
Urban dwellers can develop a European-style approach to food, buying small amounts of fresh food daily at the bakery, the butcher, and the vegetable stand.

oi41.tinypic.com
 
2013-12-18 03:19:08 AM
Here's an even greater conspiracy theory: That money usually resides in BANKS before its spent. Think about it. Those damn Reptilian bankers have gotten my attention now.
 
2013-12-18 04:51:06 AM
ADM

/free the bee's
 
2013-12-18 04:54:40 AM
I don't see what the problem is. Surely if competition was actually something that was needed, the Invisible Hand of the Free Market would produce it.
 
2013-12-18 04:56:56 AM
All your chips are belong to Pringle.
 
2013-12-18 04:57:12 AM

starsrift: I don't see what the problem is. Surely if competition was actually something that was needed, the Invisible Hand of the Free Market would produce it.


You have to actually have a free market in order for it to work.
 
2013-12-18 04:57:35 AM
no, but if you stroll down the shampoo aisle, baby stuff aisle, or makeup aisle, you'd be hard pressed to find something not made by P&G or Johnson&Johnson .  Full disclosure: my sister heads up the baby products division of P&G, she also used to run the shampoo division, but that's based in the eastern hemisphere, and she wanted to spend some time on US soil before her kids graduated from college, so she got the transfer.  It was supposed to be for the VP of everything position, but that guy went and survived his operation or didn't retire like he said he was going to, or something.

Also, the P&G satan worshipping owners hoax that keeps coming back every few years is just that, a hoax by a competing company who's products suck just enough to have to resort to rumors and slander to get any market share

while we're talking conspiracy theories, what's with the glass ceiling in the corporate world?
 
2013-12-18 04:57:53 AM
I don't recall ever wondering who gets my money when I'm grocery shopping.
I pay them for the things I want and I take them home and I'm content.
I payed for their products and got them; they could throw the money in the trash after that for all I care.
 
2013-12-18 04:59:00 AM

DrPainMD: starsrift: I don't see what the problem is. Surely if competition was actually something that was needed, the Invisible Hand of the Free Market would produce it.

You have to actually have a free market in order for it to work.


Nothing is ever free at the market.
 
2013-12-18 05:06:46 AM
Not really a conspiracy theory.

img.fark.net
 
2013-12-18 05:08:34 AM
As far as food goes, it's rare that the wife and I *don't* consume locally produced good. The big exception being fruits like bananas and oranges, All our meat/dairy/veggies/grain are from farmers within a  hundred miles of us at the outside. On occasion we'll break down and get Wendy's, or be forced to eat at a restaurant. As far as meat goes, we generally meet it before we eat it.

It's a good bit more expensive, but oh so much better.
 
2013-12-18 05:10:50 AM

robohobo: As far as food goes, it's rare that the wife and I *don't* consume locally produced good. The big exception being fruits like bananas and oranges, All our meat/dairy/veggies/grain are from farmers within a  hundred miles of us at the outside. On occasion we'll break down and get Wendy's, or be forced to eat at a restaurant. As far as meat goes, we generally meet it before we eat it.

It's a good bit more expensive, but oh so much better.


Drinks? Snacks? Breakfast cereals?
 
2013-12-18 05:15:52 AM
Shoot, between myself and the wife, we don' eat very much. But we have a teenage boy who eats everything in sight, so, a lot we buy is for bulk for him. We spend twice as much on him as we do on ourselves.
 
2013-12-18 05:18:12 AM

sendtodave: robohobo: As far as food goes, it's rare that the wife and I *don't* consume locally produced good. The big exception being fruits like bananas and oranges, All our meat/dairy/veggies/grain are from farmers within a  hundred miles of us at the outside. On occasion we'll break down and get Wendy's, or be forced to eat at a restaurant. As far as meat goes, we generally meet it before we eat it.

It's a good bit more expensive, but oh so much better.

Drinks? Snacks? Breakfast cereals?


We're big with the drinking of water, with the occasional Pepsi for her and Diet Coke for me. As for snacks, she's all about fruit and veggies. Doctor-eating.  I like a good beef jerky or home-made potato chips. Sometimes I'll make soft pretzels. Neither of us eat breakfast very often. Sometimes bacon, eggs, and toast. Every once in a long while biscuits and gravy. Again, all local goods. It's fairly easy to get locally grown ingredients in Kansas.

I've recently been trying my hand in making my own salami and pepperoni. Ah, yeah, I guess we buy a lot of foreign cheese.

I'm not saying it's cheap and available to everyone, just throwing in our food experience.
 
2013-12-18 05:19:40 AM

DrPainMD: starsrift: I don't see what the problem is. Surely if competition was actually something that was needed, the Invisible Hand of the Free Market would produce it.

You have to actually have a free market in order for it to work.


brilliant tactic you have there.

something happens that you consider good, well obviously that is the result of the free market. Then when it doesn't do what you types claim it will do, then obviously the market isn't really free.
 
2013-12-18 05:22:35 AM

sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]


Thanks, that's the first thing I thought of. Here's a large version of the same picture

Why did submitter label it a "conspiracy theory"?
 
2013-12-18 05:26:31 AM

sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]


why is this actually a problem?  If you can point out  a reason I'd be in favor of fixing that.  If I am deciding between two types of cereal and the same company makes both, so what?  The end result is it is probably cheaper for me, and they probably have better margins.  Everyone wins.
 
2013-12-18 05:28:11 AM

memebot_of_doom: sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]

Thanks, that's the first thing I thought of. Here's a large version of the same picture

Why did submitter label it a "conspiracy theory"?


He is obviously employed by the shadow grocer's association, which secretly controls all the world's markets.
 
2013-12-18 05:30:57 AM

sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]


not a conspiracy theory, but wrong in that "it's the illusion of choice" like the writer claims. most shoppers aren't worried about who owns the company, and instead are looking at the products themselves.

It's like saying car buyers have the illusion of choice since all new car profits go to the same auto companies.
 
2013-12-18 05:33:15 AM

sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]


Johnathan! ... Johnathan! ... Johnathan!
 
2013-12-18 05:45:52 AM

sendtodave: robohobo: As far as food goes, it's rare that the wife and I *don't* consume locally produced good. The big exception being fruits like bananas and oranges, All our meat/dairy/veggies/grain are from farmers within a  hundred miles of us at the outside. On occasion we'll break down and get Wendy's, or be forced to eat at a restaurant. As far as meat goes, we generally meet it before we eat it.

It's a good bit more expensive, but oh so much better.

Drinks? Snacks? Breakfast cereals?


And the fruit bats, and the orangutans...
 
2013-12-18 05:51:59 AM

log_jammin: DrPainMD: starsrift: I don't see what the problem is. Surely if competition was actually something that was needed, the Invisible Hand of the Free Market would produce it.

You have to actually have a free market in order for it to work.

brilliant tactic you have there.

something happens that you consider good, well obviously that is the result of the free market. Then when it doesn't do what you types claim it will do, then obviously the market isn't really free.


Can you show me on your shopping list where the Invisible Hand of the Free Market touched you?
-J-
 
2013-12-18 05:57:41 AM

sendtodave: robohobo: As far as food goes, it's rare that the wife and I *don't* consume locally produced good. The big exception being fruits like bananas and oranges, All our meat/dairy/veggies/grain are from farmers within a  hundred miles of us at the outside. On occasion we'll break down and get Wendy's, or be forced to eat at a restaurant. As far as meat goes, we generally meet it before we eat it.

It's a good bit more expensive, but oh so much better.

Drinks? Snacks? Breakfast cereals?


A Jedi craves not these things.
 
2013-12-18 05:59:54 AM
Weyland-Yutani.
 
2013-12-18 06:00:56 AM

log_jammin: sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]

not a conspiracy theory, but wrong in that "it's the illusion of choice" like the writer claims. most shoppers aren't worried about who owns the company, and instead are looking at the products themselves.

It's like saying car buyers have the illusion of choice since all new car profits go to the same auto companies.


To be fair, a lot of people get their panties in a wad when they find out how many luxury cars are built on the same platforms as their more lowbrow stablemates. "My Lexus ES 350 is a gussied up Toyota Camry? The horror!"
 
2013-12-18 06:04:08 AM

DrPainMD: starsrift: I don't see what the problem is. Surely if competition was actually something that was needed, the Invisible Hand of the Free Market would produce it.

You have to actually have a free market in order for it to work.


Smith said that for competition to work you need at least 20 equally sized companies competing in the market.  LOL we are sooo far from a competitive market.  The mega big companies should not be able to absorb each other, else we will just end up with the Soylent Company.
 
pla
2013-12-18 06:05:43 AM
Point02GPA : ADM

No, actually - Funniest part of the whole article! Ranting about Kellogg offering multiple brands of cereal, while completely missing the fact that Archer Daniels Midland processes 90% of all the raw materials that go into Kellogg's - And General Mills' (oh, yeah, TFA forgot about them), Post's (them too), even PepsiCo's (yeah, they make cereal too, like the entire "Quaker" brand) - various cereal offerings.

Silly slacker conspiracy theorists, missing the forest for the trees.
 
2013-12-18 06:05:55 AM
1. The food store stocks numerous brands and quantities, having bought products wholesale from the distributors.
2. Store then sells products at retail prices.
3. PROFIT
 
2013-12-18 06:11:48 AM

Jarod Cain: Can you show me on your shopping list where the Invisible Hand of the Free Market touched you?
-J-


"E" for effort.
 
2013-12-18 06:14:05 AM

Enigmamf: To be fair, a lot of people get their panties in a wad when they find out how many luxury cars are built on the same platforms as their more lowbrow stablemates. "My Lexus ES 350 is a gussied up Toyota Camry? The horror!"


I honestly didn't know people cared about things like that. I always assumed luxury car owners don't car about their cars mechanics/systems, as long as the car looks nice and starts when they put the key in them.
 
2013-12-18 06:18:18 AM
Obvious tag at the grocery store?
 
2013-12-18 06:20:36 AM

Ex-Texan: Shoot, between myself and the wife, we don' eat very much. But we have a teenage boy who eats everything in sight, so, a lot we buy is for bulk for him. We spend twice as much on him as we do on ourselves.


Amen.  Why the hell didn't someone warn me about teenage boys' appetites before I had two at the same time?  One wants to get a job at a grocery store, thinking he won't have to wait so long for me to bring the food home.
 
2013-12-18 06:30:22 AM
Can someone explain to me how stopping grocery store chains from merging will make it easier to figure out who owns Kashi?
 
2013-12-18 06:31:06 AM

sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.


Came for this. Thank you.
 
2013-12-18 06:35:06 AM

R.A.Danny: Can someone explain to me how stopping grocery store chains from merging will make it easier to figure out who owns Kashi?


The whole supply chain needs to have real competition at each level, in the production, in the distribution and in the retail.  No where other than maybe farmer markets are we even close to real competition - more like a handful of hogs at a trough (we are the water.)
 
2013-12-18 06:54:40 AM

RodneyToady: Urban dwellers can develop a European-style approach to food, buying small amounts of fresh food daily at the bakery, the butcher, and the vegetable stand.

[oi41.tinypic.com image 320x320]


The only reason Europeans do that is because they have tiny fridges.
 
2013-12-18 06:57:59 AM

Langdon_777: R.A.Danny: Can someone explain to me how stopping grocery store chains from merging will make it easier to figure out who owns Kashi?

The whole supply chain needs to have real competition at each level, in the production, in the distribution and in the retail.  No where other than maybe farmer markets are we even close to real competition - more like a handful of hogs at a trough (we are the water.)


Agreed, but they are talking about two different issues here, and counting the solution for one as the solution for both.
 
2013-12-18 07:00:54 AM
 

TheVeryDeadIanMartin: The only reason Europeans do that is because they have tiny fridges.


and no inside bathrooms which in little village communities in Italy really makes you smell bad, very noticeable on planes
 
2013-12-18 07:28:13 AM

RodneyToady: Urban dwellers can develop a European-style approach to food, buying small amounts of fresh food daily at the bakery, the butcher, and the vegetable stand.

[oi41.tinypic.com image 320x320]


This.

I don't even know if there are retail butchers where I live.  There's a slaughterhouse not too far from me, but they don't sell directly to the public.

Bakeries?  Not sure when the last time I saw one of those.

Vegetable stand?  Well, there is a farmer's market once a week, but only during part of the year.

I'll keep going to the grocery stores I usually go to.  I don't care if the money all gets funneled back to the same place, they make different products so I do have  achoice.
 
2013-12-18 07:38:12 AM
fc05.deviantart.net?
 
2013-12-18 07:50:41 AM

log_jammin: Enigmamf: To be fair, a lot of people get their panties in a wad when they find out how many luxury cars are built on the same platforms as their more lowbrow stablemates. "My Lexus ES 350 is a gussied up Toyota Camry? The horror!"

I honestly didn't know people cared about things like that. I always assumed luxury car owners don't car about their cars mechanics/systems, as long as the car looks nice and starts when they put the key in them.


I'm surprised you don't know anyone like that. I know a couple people that only buy GMC sierras and wont give a silverado a second thought.
 
2013-12-18 07:55:16 AM

Enigmamf: To be fair, a lot of people get their panties in a wad when they find out how many luxury cars are built on the same platforms as their more lowbrow stablemates. "My Lexus ES 350 is a gussied up Toyota Camry? The horror!"


My mother got in a big fight with her best friend for telling her that. "Your Lexus is just an expensive Toyota!"

I actually do worry about stuff like this, because the consolidation of power into a few corporations is as bad as the consolidation of money into just a few hands. They win BIG, and the lose is sent right down the line, with the poor losing substantively more than wealthier people.

But what are we supposed to do about it? Nobody has the power even now to stop these corporations from doing exactly what they want to do, trashing the planet and reaping the profits from it. Becaiuse the bottom line with them is profit, not sustainability, or wise use of resources, or even the actual food value of their "food." Now I hear we're getting into a Pan-Pacific Trade Agreement (or Trans-Pacific, not going to look it up) that will be much, much, larger than NAFTA. The US has to participate in it, or China or some other country is going to eat our lunch.

The little people and the earth and totally farked. We aren't even smart enough to save ourselves. I'll just make my way through the rest of my life keeping my head down and trying not to participate in most of the madness. Because I got tired of preaching "save the earth." You're not even a voice crying in the wilderness. More like a loon sobbing at a polluted lake.
 
2013-12-18 08:07:21 AM

memebot_of_doom: sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]

Thanks, that's the first thing I thought of. Here's a large version of the same picture

Why did submitter label it a "conspiracy theory"?


Because labeling something as a conspiracy theory instantly debunks it in the mind of tardmitter.
 
2013-12-18 08:16:24 AM

cryinoutloud: Enigmamf: To be fair, a lot of people get their panties in a wad when they find out how many luxury cars are built on the same platforms as their more lowbrow stablemates. "My Lexus ES 350 is a gussied up Toyota Camry? The horror!"

My mother got in a big fight with her best friend for telling her that. "Your Lexus is just an expensive Toyota!"

I actually do worry about stuff like this, because the consolidation of power into a few corporations is as bad as the consolidation of money into just a few hands. They win BIG, and the lose is sent right down the line, with the poor losing substantively more than wealthier people.

But what are we supposed to do about it? Nobody has the power even now to stop these corporations from doing exactly what they want to do, trashing the planet and reaping the profits from it. Becaiuse the bottom line with them is profit, not sustainability, or wise use of resources, or even the actual food value of their "food." Now I hear we're getting into a Pan-Pacific Trade Agreement (or Trans-Pacific, not going to look it up) that will be much, much, larger than NAFTA. The US has to participate in it, or China or some other country is going to eat our lunch.

The little people and the earth and totally farked. We aren't even smart enough to save ourselves. I'll just make my way through the rest of my life keeping my head down and trying not to participate in most of the madness. Because I got tired of preaching "save the earth." You're not even a voice crying in the wilderness. More like a loon sobbing at a polluted lake.


That mob of loons sobbing at the polluted lake will get too a critical max and then things will happen (yes our standard of living will take a dip but hopefully Gaia finally gets to spreed her wings.
 
2013-12-18 08:25:35 AM
I was thinking about this thread this morning.  I have to say, that I find the local food phenomenon oddly timed:
These huge mega-corporations and corporate farm systems built up for a reason: cheap food.  Having an infrastructure that dictates what/when/how much is grown to farmers in exchange for guaranteed purchases and back-end support cuts the costs down WAY LOW.  Not to mention keeping animals to scale in warehouses worked out quite beautifully.

Meanwhile, we have less spending money, high unemployment, and rising food costs.  However, people are following the trend that would put farmers markets and meat co-ops in the mainstream of the food industry.  A likely driver is unemployment creating food entrepreneurs, but it doesn't explain the scale to which this is being done and the prices that are being paid for the food.

Doesn't that seem odd?  That in an economic downturn the economies of scale are being ignored at a higher cost in favor of "knowing where your food came from"?  BTW, if you people bothered reading the nutritional information provided to you on the box, you wouldn't wonder where your food came from.
 
2013-12-18 08:28:04 AM
NEWSFLASH: Companies sometimes have a "product line" where they can market products to several different customer economic classes.

NEWSFLASH: Some companies are large, which allows them to sell a wide variety of products and product lines
 
2013-12-18 08:29:40 AM
Made me think of the TV commercials in the 80's that would end with the creepy voice saying "Beatrice". So I google Beatrice Foods and find out they were bought out by ConAgra.

Went to the wiki page to see what brands ConAgra owns...pages and pages.
 
2013-12-18 08:34:24 AM

NickelP: sendtodave: Not really a conspiracy theory.

[img.fark.net image 850x533]

why is this actually a problem?  If you can point out  a reason I'd be in favor of fixing that.  If I am deciding between two types of cereal and the same company makes both, so what?  The end result is it is probably cheaper for me, and they probably have better margins.  Everyone wins.


Hmmm the the laws of supply and demand do not work that way.

[Morbo.jpg]
 
2013-12-18 08:44:58 AM
Am I supposed to care who gets the money?  I buy what I like, who cares who owns the company.
 
2013-12-18 08:50:45 AM

mike_d85: I was thinking about this thread this morning.  I have to say, that I find the local food phenomenon oddly timed:
These huge mega-corporations and corporate farm systems built up for a reason: cheap food.  Having an infrastructure that dictates what/when/how much is grown to farmers in exchange for guaranteed purchases and back-end support cuts the costs down WAY LOW.  Not to mention keeping animals to scale in warehouses worked out quite beautifully.

Meanwhile, we have less spending money, high unemployment, and rising food costs.  However, people are following the trend that would put farmers markets and meat co-ops in the mainstream of the food industry.  A likely driver is unemployment creating food entrepreneurs, but it doesn't explain the scale to which this is being done and the prices that are being paid for the food.

Doesn't that seem odd?  That in an economic downturn the economies of scale are being ignored at a higher cost in favor of "knowing where your food came from"?  BTW, if you people bothered reading the nutritional information provided to you on the box, you wouldn't wonder where your food came from.


We have already experienced the late 19th century and the robber barons, we have already learnt the lesson (well most of us.)

If any company can get to the level of being a direct threat to the community itself then they need too be cut off at the knees (if it seems to be an essential service and only one or two can provide it, then let them be community owned.)

If we all get our food from one or two supply chains (instead of 20+) then we are constantly living in an almost farked up world, we have the knowledge and the experience and hence should be insulating ourselves against such (rare but chaotic) dangers, ie. wall street and their farked up derivative markets that sent the whole world into a 10 year drop in standard of living.

Personally I think there should be a cap on not only how big a company can get but how diverse they can be, before they have to become a not for profit organisation.
 
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