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(LiveLeak)   Back when I was a kid, I wanted to run away to the circus and become a Helicopter Tamer, like this guy   (liveleak.com) divider line 20
    More: Cool, Helicopter Tamer, circus, helicopters  
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2829 clicks; posted to Video » on 17 Dec 2013 at 5:42 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



20 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-17 06:13:10 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
Like this guy?
 
2013-12-17 06:29:17 PM
Looks to me like the rotors are shorter than usual - allowing for greater safety for the dude on the ground. Anybody know for sure?
 
2013-12-17 06:34:58 PM

Stig O'Tracy: Looks to me like the rotors are shorter than usual - allowing for greater safety for the dude on the ground. Anybody know for sure?


He's a gust of wind away from the chop-o-matic, no matter how you slice it.
 
2013-12-17 06:39:43 PM

Stig O'Tracy: Looks to me like the rotors are shorter than usual - allowing for greater safety for the dude on the ground. Anybody know for sure?


They're definitely shorter than the average helicopter blade, now that I look at it.  I don't have sound on, but I'd bet he got a four or five or six bladed rotor.
 
2013-12-17 06:54:08 PM
Vic Morrow approves
 
2013-12-17 07:17:52 PM

badspella: Vic Morrow approves


think we can end it there....can't compete.
 
2013-12-17 08:07:07 PM
My wife makes ham salad in the food processor. It's delicious. Some day that man will be made into an similar salad. I wouldn't want to taste it though.
 
2013-12-17 08:07:57 PM
Horrific spectator mass-casualty event n 3....2....
 
2013-12-17 08:41:59 PM

Stig O'Tracy: Looks to me like the rotors are shorter than usual - allowing for greater safety for the dude on the ground. Anybody know for sure?


I don't think so. If you look at the video closely at certain points, you can see the the rotor is longer than it at first appears, because there are stripes painted about halfway out which make the rotor look smaller than it is. Look at 3:05 in the video --- there's a good reflection from the lights that shows that the shows the size of the rotor. It appears that the helicopter is a Bell 206, and the rotor diameter looks correct for a 206 in that image.

More importantly, it's much harder than you might think to shorten a helicopter blade. It takes a tremendous amount of engineering to design and certify a helicopter rotor. Shortening the rotor would increase the power required to hover, but the rotor would be unable to produce the required lift anyway, unless the rotor speed were increased, which would require a redesign of the transmission. Even if those problems were solved, changing the blade length would affect the rotor dynamics, and could lead to ground resonance, flutter, or some other problem. I could go on and on, but I would bet dollars to donuts that the rotors are stock. It's just too hard to design and build a one-off rotor.
 
2013-12-17 08:44:26 PM

PiperArrow: Stig O'Tracy: Looks to me like the rotors are shorter than usual - allowing for greater safety for the dude on the ground. Anybody know for sure?

I don't think so. If you look at the video closely at certain points, you can see the the rotor is longer than it at first appears, because there are stripes painted about halfway out which make the rotor look smaller than it is. Look at 3:05 in the video --- there's a good reflection from the lights that shows that the shows the size of the rotor. It appears that the helicopter is a Bell 206, and the rotor diameter looks correct for a 206 in that image.

More importantly, it's much harder than you might think to shorten a helicopter blade. It takes a tremendous amount of engineering to design and certify a helicopter rotor. Shortening the rotor would increase the power required to hover, but the rotor would be unable to produce the required lift anyway, unless the rotor speed were increased, which would require a redesign of the transmission. Even if those problems were solved, changing the blade length would affect the rotor dynamics, and could lead to ground resonance, flutter, or some other problem. I could go on and on, but I would bet dollars to donuts that the rotors are stock. It's just too hard to design and build a one-off rotor.


I just colored you sky blue.  Thanks for the dope!
 
2013-12-17 08:50:15 PM

catsfish: My wife makes ham salad in the food processor. It's delicious. Some day that man will be made into an similar salad. I wouldn't want to taste it though.


i love ham salad. mmmmm, ham salad...
 
2013-12-17 10:00:16 PM

PiperArrow: It takes a tremendous amount of engineering to design and certify a helicopter rotor


What's that old saying? A helicopter is 10,000 moving parts trying desperately to break away from each other. Something like that.

For that sort of low flying with a helicopter, isn't there also a risk of some sort of ground resonance sending it out of control? I remember seeing videos claiming to show that.
 
2013-12-17 10:29:11 PM

t3knomanser: PiperArrow: It takes a tremendous amount of engineering to design and certify a helicopter rotor

What's that old saying? A helicopter is 10,000 moving parts trying desperately to break away from each other. Something like that.


Another one: A helicopter doesn't really fly... it just beats the air into submission.
 
2013-12-17 10:53:07 PM

t3knomanser: PiperArrow: It takes a tremendous amount of engineering to design and certify a helicopter rotor

What's that old saying? A helicopter is 10,000 moving parts trying desperately to break away from each other. Something like that.

For that sort of low flying with a helicopter, isn't there also a risk of some sort of ground resonance sending it out of control? I remember seeing videos claiming to show that.


Ground resonance only occurs when the helicopter is actually touching the ground. If I recall correctly, only helicopters with a fully articulated rotor can enter ground resonance. The Bell helos have a teetering rotor system.
 
2013-12-17 11:45:12 PM
that video is so 90's.   helicopters and megaramps are the new hotness.
 
2013-12-18 01:48:08 AM

t3knomanser: PiperArrow: It takes a tremendous amount of engineering to design and certify a helicopter rotor

What's that old saying? A helicopter is 10,000 moving parts trying desperately to break away from each other. Something like that.

For that sort of low flying with a helicopter, isn't there also a risk of some sort of ground resonance sending it out of control? I remember seeing videos claiming to show that.



Looked up ground resonance.  Wow.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QgXQ39aL5I
 
2013-12-18 03:19:31 AM
This stunt is beyond stupid. If this "tamer" would have been struck by an ill-timed move of the props, you are looking at an arena full of traumatized-for-life spectators. I would not go to see this show, even if they payed me.
 
2013-12-18 03:44:05 AM
Ground resonance only happens if you're stuck to something.
 
2013-12-18 05:21:14 AM

Myth Sammich: This stunt is beyond stupid. If this "tamer" would have been struck by an ill-timed move of the props, you are looking at an arena full of traumatized-for-life spectators. I would not go to see this show, even if they payed me.


I wouldn't go see this show not because I give a shait about the performer's life but because I give a shait about my own life. Helicopters fall out of the sky way to often for me to feel comfortable around one flying like that.
 
2013-12-18 10:23:35 AM
wanted: 5 foot actor, 5' 2" is too tall...
 
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