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(Yahoo)   Lithium batteries still exploding whenever they damn well feel like it   (ca.news.yahoo.com) divider line 12
    More: Scary, lithium batteries, Mill Woods, chemical burn, explosions  
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2021 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Dec 2013 at 3:15 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



12 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-12-16 03:18:54 PM
Problem with lithium batteries is they're bipolar.
 
2013-12-16 03:35:23 PM
Lithium?  Damn near killed 'um!
 
2013-12-16 03:37:01 PM

RIP Kevin Millwood

 
2013-12-16 03:49:06 PM
They should make SSRI. batteries.
 
2013-12-16 05:05:23 PM
That's okay, I shaved my head.
 
2013-12-16 06:21:28 PM
Article is useless. Was it a AA or some large industrial battery, given that it was at a mill?
 
2013-12-16 07:04:27 PM

Medic Zero: Article is useless. Was it a AA or some large industrial battery, given that it was at a mill?


A pipeline service company, Mill is just part of the name of the town.

Given they had to evacuate the building, probably something on par with the cells used in electric cars, something capable or running a spot welder.

Technically a laptop or PC backup cell  could cause that much trouble, but it's extremely unlikely it would require clearing the whole building.  Could just be their safety procedures are pretty extreme, too.

// Unsurprisingly, as battery energy density has approached that of gasoline, the dangers of leaving them sitting around unattended and not checking them regularly have also approached those of gasoline.
 
2013-12-16 07:05:29 PM

Medic Zero: Article is useless. Was it a AA or some large industrial battery, given that it was at a mill?


Also, what was the chemistry?  Lithium-Polymer batteries will burn if you look at them wrong.  Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries can be thrown in a fire without much happening.  There are a ton of different Lithium based chemistries, all with different properties.
 
2013-12-16 07:07:11 PM

Jim_Callahan: Given they had to evacuate the building, probably something on par with the cells used in electric cars, something capable or running a spot welder.

Technically a laptop or PC backup cell  could cause that much trouble


Actually, Laptop cells are far more likely to be a relatively unstable chemistry than EV batteries.
 
2013-12-16 07:22:20 PM

Hollie Maea: Actually, Laptop cells are far more likely to be a relatively unstable chemistry than EV batteries.


If you're using a Lithium carrier, the substrate chemistry doesn't really matter that much from a fire hazard standpoint.  You're still going to have a pretty rapid discharge that puts out a decent amount of heat if someone draws too hard, and the Lithium itself reacts aggressively with standard atmospheric conditions outside of the electrolyte (and there's not really any electrolyte for Li+ that's not, at the minimum, incredibly poisonous).

Laptop batteries are more likely to breach, or to fail in general, but it's a question of geometry (specifically the constraints of overall size and weight being tighter for consumer electronics), not chemistry.  The chemistry's going to set itself on fire if exposed to air either way.  Carbon-anode, silica-anode, whatever, you knock a crack in the side of a cell and you're on fire (and the whole thing's melting and setting the rest of the cell on fire, probably) regardless.

Which, again, isn't really an "everybody panic" thing.  Just like gas or lighter fluid, don't do stupid shiat with Li batteries and keep an eye on them for obvious damage and you're fine.  That's sort of why I'm figuring we're talking about an industrial-scale battery, something heavy enough to be slug around a lot but not attached to anything delicate enough that people watched carefully for exterior damage.
 
2013-12-17 12:31:42 PM
i use my Li rechargeable flashlight to heat my hot chocolate , is that normal?
 
2013-12-17 02:19:09 PM

Jim_Callahan: If you're using a Lithium carrier, the substrate chemistry doesn't really matter that much from a fire hazard standpoint.


That's just not correct.
 
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