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(Boing Boing)   Amazon introduces seasonality to purchased online movies: You cannot watch purchased Christmas movies during the month of December   (boingboing.net) divider line 100
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5530 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Dec 2013 at 8:36 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-12-16 08:22:57 AM  
This sounds like less of a "Amazon trying to ruin Christmas" story and more of a "Disney thinks they can annoy people into purchasing their shiatty competing service" story.  Disney probably pulled a lot of non-Christmas content as well.
 
2013-12-16 08:24:51 AM  

serial_crusher: This sounds like less of a "Amazon trying to ruin Christmas" story and more of a "Disney thinks they can annoy people into purchasing their shiatty competing service" story.  Disney probably pulled a lot of non-Christmas content as well.


This.
 
2013-12-16 08:25:27 AM  
This is definitely a policy thing that needs to get worked out though.  If you "buy" something, you should have reasonably indefinite access rights to it.  Maybe if a content producer pulls something from a streaming service like that, they should be required to give you access to a version that can be downloaded and stored locally (full of DRM, of course!).
Will probably just result in more things going to subscription or rental models, though.
 
2013-12-16 08:42:23 AM  
What is it with Internet's obnoxious giving a pass to Amazon and Google no matter what they do?

At a minimum, Amazon should change the "Buy Now" button to "License the content now but leave the rights to where and when I can consume the content to the content provider".
This is not even close to what the word "Buy" means, common or legally.
 
2013-12-16 08:43:20 AM  
This definitely won't encourage pirating
 
2013-12-16 08:44:52 AM  
And people wonder why I'm becoming a luddite...
You'd think CD would be used to this by now though... having written on the same type of event 4 years ago.
http://boingboing.net/2009/07/20/amazons-orwellian-de.html
 
2013-12-16 08:47:48 AM  
Services are fleeting, piracy is forever.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-12-16 08:50:32 AM  
ThatGuyOverThere

Doctorow strikes me as the kind of guy who will never get over it.
 
2013-12-16 08:54:45 AM  
Oblig:

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2013-12-16 09:04:46 AM  
You don't buy electronic content. You license it. This is why piracy is a licensing violation, not theft.
 
2013-12-16 09:08:14 AM  

hinten: What is it with Internet's obnoxious giving a pass to Amazon and Google no matter what they do?

At a minimum, Amazon should change the "Buy Now" button to "License the content now but leave the rights to where and when I can consume the content to the content provider".
This is not even close to what the word "Buy" means, common or legally.


Because Disney was the one who pulled the content and Amazon provided a full refund? Amazon generally tries to do what is right by the customer, but they have no recourse if the rights-holders deny them access to the content. They legally have no way to provide the file to the customer any more if Disney pulls their content off of Instant Video.
 
2013-12-16 09:20:03 AM  

van1ty: This definitely won't encourage pirating

 
2013-12-16 09:22:40 AM  
This reason is why I laugh at my friend who has bought over 3000 dollars worth of games off of steam.  One day if Steam ever gets sold or goes under he is screwed out of his games.
 
2013-12-16 09:26:53 AM  

baufan2005: This reason is why I laugh at my friend who has bought over 3000 dollars worth of games off of steam.  One day if Steam ever gets sold or goes under he is screwed out of his games.


This is the reason why I get pirated versions of all my legally bought movies, music, and games.
 
2013-12-16 09:28:02 AM  
Good god, I didn't realize this could happen. I've bought a few movies off Amazon with the idea I'd have access to them forever. I see that I'm wrong.

I've bought my last movie from Amazon.

kurlumbenus: You don't buy electronic content. You license it. This is why piracy is a licensing violation, not theft.


Yes, but theft sounds more sinister.
 
2013-12-16 09:38:04 AM  
So torrent it...
 
2013-12-16 09:40:18 AM  
TFA wants to primarily blame Amazon. They are not without fault, but IMO, it's Disney who is the real asshat of the IP world.

/fark off, Walt
 
2013-12-16 09:51:15 AM  
Tell me more about how much better this digital content is vs those outdated disks I can own and play where and when I want.
 
2013-12-16 09:53:37 AM  
Amazon has explained to me that Disney can pull their content at any time

Damn you, Walt Bezos!
 
2013-12-16 10:15:23 AM  
My personal stance: I use netflix or similar sites for TV/movies, buy all my music, and anything I can't readily obtain I will torrent.

I'm not huge into media, I mostly just want to watch a show here or there, 90% of my free time is filled with internet browsing, reading, or games (oh BG:EE, damn you for getting me back on that horse and making me want to buy BG:EE2).

So torrenting isn't the debil. Just another tool, but not even my primary one.
 
2013-12-16 10:21:22 AM  

stewbert: TFA wants to primarily blame Amazon. They are not without fault, but IMO, it's Disney who is the real asshat of the IP world.

/fark off, Walt


They both sound shiatty. Amazon should not make deals where they sell content that can be conditionally pulled. Allowing Christmas content to be pulled at Christmas essentially makes those purchases worthless.

Albeit Disney is making moves that reek of a company that has become too big and influential. Companies that say fark off you'll pay us anyways to their customer base rely on their clout to make obvious cash grabs, ethics be damned.
 
2013-12-16 10:22:44 AM  
This is why i still buy DVDs.
 
2013-12-16 10:23:57 AM  
this is why if i really think i'll want to watch a movie more than once or twice, i buy a hard copy of it

the vast majority of stuff i just watch on netflix now, but there's something to be said for still being able to just sit down and watch whatever you want without being at the will of somebody like Disney
 
2013-12-16 10:26:57 AM  
This is why I still buy physical media.

All this hype about the future being "the cloud" but what it really means is that companies continue to take your money as if they sold you something but they haven't actually sold you anything.  They've just granted you the right to use it for some period of time, until they change their mind, or the stop supporting their DRM scheme, or they go out of business, or whatever.

If you must buy digital "goods" have some sense and get them in a DRM-free format so that your possession and access to them can't be revoked at a corporation's whim.
 
2013-12-16 10:31:19 AM  

Mad_Radhu: hinten: What is it with Internet's obnoxious giving a pass to Amazon and Google no matter what they do?

At a minimum, Amazon should change the "Buy Now" button to "License the content now but leave the rights to where and when I can consume the content to the content provider".
This is not even close to what the word "Buy" means, common or legally.

Because Disney was the one who pulled the content and Amazon provided a full refund? Amazon generally tries to do what is right by the customer, but they have no recourse if the rights-holders deny them access to the content. They legally have no way to provide the file to the customer any more if Disney pulls their content off of Instant Video.


Only after the customer noticed it was gone out of their library and called to complain.  Did Amazon AUTOMATICALLY credit the impacted customers' accounts?  While TFA didn't say so, we can imply not considering he had to call to complain.

If you "buy" something, and you are later forced to "return it," you should be given an automatic refund.  Anything less than that is still theft by Amazon.

/will NEVER purchase a digital version of a movie through one of these streaming services until this practice is rendered illegal
 
2013-12-16 10:32:59 AM  
The Torrents keep the classics alive through continual regeneration.

I downloaded Vanishing Point in 720p the other day off of TPB.  Took 30 minutes.

Then I deleted it.  If I want to watch it again, I'll download it again.
 
2013-12-16 10:41:25 AM  

FarkGrudge: If you "buy" something, and you are later forced to "return it," you should be given an automatic refund. Anything less than that is still theft by Amazon.


No, then it's "renting".

/I had to make "air quotes" while typing that
//"la-ser"
 
2013-12-16 10:43:13 AM  
Like the author points out this all lands squarely on Amazon's shoulders. It is up to them to allow or disallow Disney's ridiculous policies. In this case they absolutely should have told Disney to fark off, even going as far as not having any Disney content for sale. Amazon has to stand up to this crap or they could be in a heap of trouble such as class action lawsuits and lots of bad PR and loss of customer trust.
 
2013-12-16 10:46:05 AM  

serial_crusher: This is definitely a policy thing that needs to get worked out though.  If you "buy" something, you should have reasonably indefinite access rights to it.  Maybe if a content producer pulls something from a streaming service like that, they should be required to give you access to a version that can be downloaded and stored locally (full of DRM, of course!).
Will probably just result in more things going to subscription or rental models, though.


Meh. The rest of the world is just biatching about something gamers have been experiencing since the 80s. Now that it's books and movies instead of video games, NOW everyone's pissed.
 
2013-12-16 10:52:58 AM  

LemSkroob: This is why i still buy DVDs.


And Bluray.  I buy them used, rip them, then sell them back again.  A minor price to have it forever, and without having to download it.
 
2013-12-16 10:54:25 AM  
And this is why the access-over-ownership model is for suckers.
 
2013-12-16 10:59:48 AM  
hinten:
At a minimum, Amazon should change the "Buy Now" button to "License the content now but leave the rights to where and when I can consume the content to the content provider".
This is not even close to what the word "Buy" means, common or legally.


This.

At the best case you're leasing their product. You can't transfer ownership, you can't lend it (or if you can you can do so under extremely limited terms and for limited times) and the company has the ability to lock you out of access to things you've purchased.
 
2013-12-16 11:01:01 AM  
in the vhs days disney would release a popular old movie for only a little while and them wait a few years before doing it again. so you bought your little kid bambi and then tossed it when the kid grew out of it. 5 years later your neighbor has a kid and is looking for the title and it isn't available. but it will be in a few months. you always had a bambi is available but snow white isn't type cycle going on and disney loved having those tapes being tossed instead of passed down to friends and family.
 
2013-12-16 11:03:23 AM  

Target Builder: hinten:
At a minimum, Amazon should change the "Buy Now" button to "License the content now but leave the rights to where and when I can consume the content to the content provider".
This is not even close to what the word "Buy" means, common or legally.

This.

At the best case you're leasing their product. You can't transfer ownership, you can't lend it (or if you can you can do so under extremely limited terms and for limited times) and the company has the ability to lock you out of access to things you've purchased.


I've bought a few Kindle books.

They immediately go into Calibre where the DRM gets stripped off and they get converted to epub format.

I'm no pirate.  I pay full price and I don't re-distribute files.  But I'll be damned if I'm going to let Amazon revoke my access to books that I've bought and paid for.
 
2013-12-16 11:03:31 AM  

xanadian: FarkGrudge: If you "buy" something, and you are later forced to "return it," you should be given an automatic refund. Anything less than that is still theft by Amazon.

No, then it's "renting".

/I had to make "air quotes" while typing that
//"la-ser"


Except that they have separate "renting" and "purchasing" prices.
 
2013-12-16 11:04:37 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Target Builder: hinten:
At a minimum, Amazon should change the "Buy Now" button to "License the content now but leave the rights to where and when I can consume the content to the content provider".
This is not even close to what the word "Buy" means, common or legally.

This.

At the best case you're leasing their product. You can't transfer ownership, you can't lend it (or if you can you can do so under extremely limited terms and for limited times) and the company has the ability to lock you out of access to things you've purchased.

I've bought a few Kindle books.

They immediately go into Calibre where the DRM gets stripped off and they get converted to epub format.

I'm no pirate.  I pay full price and I don't re-distribute files.  But I'll be damned if I'm going to let Amazon revoke my access to books that I've bought and paid for.


Why do you hate America, Felon?
 
2013-12-16 11:05:15 AM  
I wonder if Amazon or the BBC tried the same thing with The Day of the Doctor.  I signed on the morning after, bought it for 2.99, and then, it wouldn't show up on my DVD player or my computer.  I noticed that the price had gone up to 6.99.  I ended up putting it on my "watchlist," and then I could access it, but it still will not appear under the movies I "own."
 
2013-12-16 11:08:11 AM  

LemSkroob: This is why i still buy DVDs.


.....and blu rays.

I don't need anyone's farking permission to view something I have paid for.
 
2013-12-16 11:08:26 AM  

serial_crusher: This sounds like less of a "Amazon trying to ruin Christmas" story and more of a "Disney thinks they can annoy people into purchasing their shiatty competing service" story.  Disney probably pulled a lot of non-Christmas content as well.


It may also have something do with this (warning: USA Today with autoplay vid):

"What's worth watching, and what might not be, in prime time on Monday.

Disney's Prep & Landing/Prep & Landing 2: Naughty Vs. Nice | ABC, 8 ET/PT"


Disney doesn't want people to skip the airing on ABC because they already own their own copy.
 
2013-12-16 11:24:46 AM  

FarkGrudge: xanadian: FarkGrudge: If you "buy" something, and you are later forced to "return it," you should be given an automatic refund. Anything less than that is still theft by Amazon.

No, then it's "renting".

/I had to make "air quotes" while typing that
//"la-ser"

Except that they have separate "renting" and "purchasing" prices.


Yeah, I know.  Hence the Dr. Evil-esque "air quotes."  It's all really shifty.
 
2013-12-16 11:27:18 AM  

LemSkroob: This is why i still buy DVDs.


Exactly.

And the hoops to get the digital edition working when they included it "free".
 
2013-12-16 11:33:45 AM  
We saw Microsoft's first DRM music service get canceled, and we've seen Amazon remotely deleting books from Kindles. I don't know wny anyone would think "the cloud" is useful for anything other than screwing the users. Even without being greedy or selfish, companies can still make mistakes and screw everything up.

I purchase the rights to enjoy my media, and whenever the delivery mechanism is flawed (i.e., dependent on some external agency to provide access to it), I take measures to ensure that I can work around those flaws.
 
2013-12-16 11:35:45 AM  
If you paid cash money for "virtual content" that has an 11-page EULA then you, indeed, are the sucker here. People say DVDs are dead, but there's no way I'm paying good money for something a corporation can yank away at a whim just so they can extract more profit from me. Fark them.
 
2013-12-16 11:35:56 AM  
Add me to the list of people that want's a disk. If I'm going to buy a movie because I want to watch it again and again, I want a physical object.
 
2013-12-16 11:43:57 AM  

serial_crusher: This is definitely a policy thing that needs to get worked out though.  If you "buy" something, you should have reasonably indefinite access rights to it.  Maybe if a content producer pulls something from a streaming service like that, they should be required to give you access to a version that can be downloaded and stored locally (full of DRM, of course!).
Will probably just result in more things going to subscription or rental models, though.


You didn't buy the movie.  You bought a revokable license to watch a movie.  I don't know why people are still surprised by this in 2013.

The only way to be sure you will have access to digital media for any length of time is to store it locally, stripped of all forms of DRM.
 
2013-12-16 11:44:45 AM  

baufan2005: This reason is why I laugh at my friend who has bought over 3000 dollars worth of games off of steam.  One day if Steam ever gets sold or goes under he is screwed out of his games.


While there is some validity to this argument, Steam is probably the least appropriate service to use it on. I cannot think of any previous incident where Steam has wholesale removed access to already-purchased content.  Hell, even when games change hands and the new content holders want to take their ball back (e.g. Cryostasis), Valve's response has been universally "go piss up a rope".  Not that they won't let game companies require ridiculous things of games they sell, but they seem to draw the line at changing the deal after the sale is made.

Also, at this point worrying about Steam getting sold or going under is like worrying about Microsoft, Apple, or Google doing the same.  It could happen sometime in the future, but a great many things would need to occur between now and then for it to happen.
 
2013-12-16 11:58:11 AM  
Hey, remember when Amazon Erased Orwell Books From Kindle?

Good times.
 
2013-12-16 12:03:38 PM  
Dick move Disney, dick move.  Glad to see Amazon at least trying to do the right thing, more and more they look like the only retailer willing to do right for the customer when it comes to online entities and shiatty license bullshiat (I've met similar crap in the gaming world too).
 
2013-12-16 12:05:16 PM  
Seems like this may be a reason to buy a farking DVD, rather than trying to stream everything.

Problem solved, my daughter gets to watch her movies on DVD any time she wants.
 
2013-12-16 12:15:46 PM  

baufan2005: This reason is why I laugh at my friend who has bought over 3000 dollars worth of games off of steam. One day if Steam ever gets sold or goes under he is screwed out of his games.


If that ever happens, chances are, somebody will release cracks for many of those Steam games.  Or you can just download a complete cracked copy of the game off the torrents.
 
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